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Hope Ann

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 195 total)
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  • #117952
    Hope Ann
    @hope-ann

    @daeus Obviously impossible because I’m such a sweet, innocent thing.

    Victory in the march. Hope in the destination.

    #114538
    Hope Ann
    @hope-ann

    @arindown Yep, everyone can comment. Thanks for the thoughts!

    Victory in the march. Hope in the destination.

    #108578
    Hope Ann
    @hope-ann

    @esmeralda-gramilton You can tag whoever you like; you probably better know the people here who would be most interested in this question.

    I like your answer. And another way to do it is using the MC as an unreliable narrator. If he or she actually does have a really good relationship with the villain, then they’ll be more likely to trust him and trust his reasonings. You can show little hints, like Esmeralda said, with the villain not showing up on time for rescues or doing these little things here or there but the MC is so sure of his friend that the reader is emotionally sure of him while someone looking closely will start to get suspicious.

    Victory in the march. Hope in the destination.

    #106936
    Hope Ann
    @hope-ann

    There are various things that can help with this, but one of the largest is something Brandon said in a recent podcast we recorded.

    If you don’t take your writing seriously, no one else will. Be willing to sacrifice free time or gaming time or such. Show that you are dedicated to what you are doing. It doesn’t mean you’ll get everything right away. But if others see you are serious about something, they’re much more likely to treat it as serious themselves.

    Any thoughts or others to tag, @daeus?

    Victory in the march. Hope in the destination.

    #105727
    Hope Ann
    @hope-ann

    My answer:

    I’ve struggled with this myself. I had two MCs in different books. Both were nice, kind people who just wanted to help and save everyone. And they started feeling way too similar. There were a few things I did to figure out differences.

    One was to put them in the same situation and then watch them carefully to see where they acted differently. What did one character notice that the other didn’t? Did one character pace while the other was content to sit still? Even if they’re brothers, they’ll have different backstories–or rather, different ways they view their backstories. How do they view each other? Do they fear different things? Want different things? Do others treat them differently and what is their reaction to that? It takes work, but dig down deep and you’ll find differences.

    Victory in the march. Hope in the destination.

    #104699
    Hope Ann
    @hope-ann

    @naiya-dyani If the world isn’t real, then it’s speculative fiction; probably fantasy. 😉 There’s lots of kinds. Some have magic. Some don’t. There’s one fantasy series that is pretty much ‘this world’ except for the names of the lands and peoples. So there’s lots of kinds.

    Victory in the march. Hope in the destination.

    #104681
    Hope Ann
    @hope-ann

    Also, here’s a cool list of fantasy sub-genres. You have to scroll down a little. I’ve not even heard of some. Honestly, you can couple about any genre with the term ‘fantasy’ and make something out of it, I think. Even if there isn’t an official term, it’s still a ‘steampunk fantasy’ or ‘western fantasy’.

    Also here’s that link: http://bestfantasybooks.com/fantasy-genre.php

    Victory in the march. Hope in the destination.

    #104680
    Hope Ann
    @hope-ann

    It’s basically…not real. So involves magic or superpowers or sci-fi or supernatural fiction.

    Google defines it as: a genre of fiction that encompasses works in which the setting is other than the real world, involving supernatural, futuristic, or other imagined elements.

    Victory in the march. Hope in the destination.

    #104654
    Hope Ann
    @hope-ann

    Ooo, hmmm. It depends on the definition of fantasy, I suppose. XD I had a girl reading a book in a fantasy world once, and it was about a futuristic type of setting. Though I suppose it could also involve powers and magic that the world doesn’t have. A world with fire powers obsessed with stories where water powers are a thing and such. Now I want to see this…

    Victory in the march. Hope in the destination.

    #104641
    Hope Ann
    @hope-ann

    As in… fantasy is speculative fiction? Or what is fantasy? Or how many kinds of sub-genres of fantasy are there?

    Victory in the march. Hope in the destination.

    #104589
    Hope Ann
    @hope-ann

    *looks at lists of plans*

    I’m hoping to write 10k in my book

    Start a podcast

    Get together tax info (yay)

    Also I’m going to the Dominican Republic at the end of February for a few months for a mission internship. So that’s a thing I’m getting ready for.

    Victory in the march. Hope in the destination.

    #104561
    Hope Ann
    @hope-ann

    In the newsletter, we have discussed language once before. Actually @daeus answered that question because I didn’t know. So I’m going to post his reply here. And maybe he’ll have other people to tag since I’m woefully out of date when it comes to who is active on the forum right now.

    First of all, I wouldn’t be Tolkien until I’d already mastered writing fairly well. It makes a story deep, but it’s far from essential for good writing.

    From Daeus:

    I suggest not getting overzealous and to just work with what you already know. The language I invented was based on the ones I had some familiarity with—Greek, Latin, and English.

    If writers are trying to be original, focusing on making up dialects and slang like Brandon Sanderson may be easier.

    Finally, if you do invent a language, I think it’d be neat to make the way the words are formed symbolic. For instance, in the language I created, each noun has a prefix from one of five categories, each symbolically linked to one of the four races + monsters. A noun with a prefix linked to a certain race is thought to have qualities similar to the stereotypes of that race. It could even be possible to make the construction of language grammar thematic, though I can’t say I’ve heard of it being done.

    There is also a professional book on this topic that I haven’t read called The Art of Language Invention.

    Victory in the march. Hope in the destination.

    #103299
    Hope Ann
    @hope-ann

    Goals this year…

    • Finish and Pitch Rebel Heir
    • Write up a life-script based off a sermon series
    • Write and publish my next Legends of Light novella; preferable two more
    • Make three local friends
    • Create a podcast
    • Grow my newsletter to 2k subs
    • Read 50 books

    And… maybe go on a mission internship in which case I’ll only get some of the above-mentioned things done. XD

    Victory in the march. Hope in the destination.

    #103298
    Hope Ann
    @hope-ann

    This week (and for many weeks hereafter) I have a goal to write/edit 10k in my current work in progress, Rebel Heir.

    And I have some sermons I’m listening too and taking notes on

    Also a few other random things prepping for the rest of the week.

    OH. And Thursday I have a phone interview for a possible mission school internship thing. So that’s cool.

    Victory in the march. Hope in the destination.

    #103042
    Hope Ann
    @hope-ann

    @daeus-lamb Nice! The one critique I have is the first line.

    Failing to save her fourteen years ago haunts his memory,

    The ‘her’ is vague and not explained and threw me because I was expecting to be told who she was. If it was even just a generic description like ‘sister’ or ‘one he loved’ or… something better than that. XD But something, I think it would be better.

    Victory in the march. Hope in the destination.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 195 total)

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