Daeus Lamb

  • @phoenix As you wish. Sorry to see you go.

  • there is nothing in the Bible that says “all vampires are evil”

    Well… “For it seemed good to the Holy Spirit, and to us, to lay upon you no greater burden than these necessary things: that you abstain from things offered to idols, from blood…”

    (The story has been itching me for years and I really wanna write it, haha)

    @ka_modina That’s the rea…[Read more]

  • Well, I think I finally have my blurb! I took the time to get out of my editors’s head and read the recent blurbs with a fresh mind. This one just felt right to me.

    In the beginning, the Songkiller sang chaos into the fabric of the world. Now, he’s returning to finish his dark symphony…

    Exton hunts for redemption at the throne of the imm…[Read more]

  • I wouldn’t exactly call it confusing. Lewis presents the same idea in Mere Christianity.

  • Daeus Lamb replied to the topic Prayer Requests #1 in the forum Prayer Requests 1 week ago

    @the-inkspiller How about you friend me on Facebook. They have calling from there.

  • Daeus Lamb replied to the topic Prayer Requests #1 in the forum Prayer Requests 1 week ago

    @the-inkspiller I guess that’s true. 😉 Let’s do 9pm EST.

  • Daeus Lamb replied to the topic Prayer Requests #1 in the forum Prayer Requests 1 week ago

    @the-inkspiller 😄Everybody’s left a book unfinished. When would be a good time for you?

  • Daeus Lamb replied to the topic Prayer Requests #1 in the forum Prayer Requests 1 week ago

    @the-inkspiller You wanna meet and pray, man?

  • But I would apreciate some stories of a priest where he can do his job in peace, like if it could be a normal part of life of the other characters. Kind of Father Brown from Chersterton…(but nowadays).

    @candide Then write it, bro

  • Dilemma: I’ve got conflicting feedback on my blurb. Some say I should change it, others that I shouldn’t.

    I’m in search of opinionated people to help clear me out of this muddle.

    Here’s what I had:

    In the beginning, the Songkiller sang chaos into the fabric of the world. Now, he’s returning to finish his dark symphony…

    Exton hunts to red…[Read more]

  • The moral part is the hard part. 😛 Shadow of the Conquerer is similar to Brandon Sanderson, though lots of sexual themes. Not rated R, but I still hesitate to recommend it. Six of Crows has excellent worldbuilding (and prose!). It does include some cold-blooded gore and a short scene containing nudity.

    The Wheel of Time might be good, though…[Read more]

  • A series of thirteen series? 🤔😳You don’t mean 13 books in a series? 13 books is large, but people have done it… Actually, 13 series could be reasonable too /as long as each series can be read independently/. For instance, Brandon Sanderson has a massive literary universe with multiple planets, but you can totally pick up the stories for just one…[Read more]

  • I’ve been vacillating on The Wheel of Time for a while. It’s quite a commitment + plus it sounds a little graphic… probably not too bad, but /fourteen/ books worth. I’m sure I’d learn a lot through it.

  • Several months ago, a new character I’d created went rogue and escaped the world I’d placed him in. Leaping between realms, his ghostly spirit crashed into a peaceful wood where a fisherman dipped his net into por […]

    • Mistborn meets Till We Have Faces. That sounds AWESOME!

    • imgur.com/NP8Amyq

      Thanks for the article, Daeus. I’m really not an epic writer, but it was interesting to read about your process. You remind me of Orson Scott Card’s section in “Writing Fantasy & Science Fiction,” in which he spends a ton of time talking about how he comes up with ideas—and, more importantly, how they ferment and develop over months and years.

      “All but a handful of my stories have come from combining two completely unrelated ideas that have been following their own tracks through my imagination. And all the stories I was still proud of six months after writing them have come from ideas that ripened for many months—usually years—between the time I first thought of them and the time they were ready to put into a story.” (Card, 33)

      Interestingly (to me), though Card describes Ender’s Game coming about in the long term like this, over the course of years, he didn’t apply a terribly perfectionist attitude to it, publishing it first as a short story and then later as a novel, and then updating that novel with more modern politics six years later. Which, like the concept of the ansible that’s the core of the Ender saga, was a hugely precognitive concept considering the very modern “patch a finished product after release” strategy we see more in game, ebook, and even movie release strategy these days.

      Also, have you read The Wheel of Time? I haven’t, as I’m not an epic fantasy fan, though Towers of Midnight has been holding up my computer monitor for years on account of its oatmeal-like thickness.

      • I’ve been vacillating on The Wheel of Time for a while. It’s quite a commitment + plus it sounds a little graphic… probably not too bad, but /fourteen/ books worth. I’m sure I’d learn a lot through it.

    • *bounces* Yes! Yes! Yesssss!

    • *kudos* Thank you! I was starting to wonder if the public would accept a series comprised of thirteen series.

      • A series of thirteen series? 🤔😳You don’t mean 13 books in a series? 13 books is large, but people have done it… Actually, 13 series could be reasonable too /as long as each series can be read independently/. For instance, Brandon Sanderson has a massive literary universe with multiple planets, but you can totally pick up the stories for just one planet and enjoy them.

        If you’re going to write a series of 13 books, the first one has to be /amazing/. Not many people will buy book 13 before reading book 1, and if book one was only a 4-star read, a lot of people will go look for a 5-star standalone rather than finishing the series.

    • Thank you for this article! I’ll definitely be coming back to it a lot in the near future. I’ve always been a Tolkien fan, but after reading Sanderson last year, I fell in love with epic fantasy all over again. I’m encouraged to hear that rewriting and outlining and compiling ideas for a single story for the past five years means it’s halfway through the maturing process 😉

      Are there any other epic fantasy books you’d recommend? Like I mentioned, I’ve red LotR and Stormlight Archive, but I’m having a hard time finding other books of the same type (preferably ones with somewhat moral characters, too).

      • The moral part is the hard part. 😛 Shadow of the Conquerer is similar to Brandon Sanderson, though lots of sexual themes. Not rated R, but I still hesitate to recommend it. Six of Crows has excellent worldbuilding (and prose!). It does include some cold-blooded gore and a short scene containing nudity.

        The Wheel of Time might be good, though I’m still trying to decide whether or not to read it myself. My understanding is that it can be pretty mature, but isn’t very graphic. (Brandon Sanderson is famous for finishing The Wheel of Time after Robert Jordan died.)

        Currently, I’m reading Asimov’s Foundation series. It’s sci-fi, but the world-building is pretty immense and you could apply a lot to fantasy. I’m only one book in, but so far it’s relatively clean.

        Not much else comes to mind… Of course, read all the Middle Earth books, like The Silmarillion and Beren and Luthien.

        Plus, don’t forget The Wingfeather Saga! 😉

    • Kendra replied 1 week ago

      I thoroughly enjoyed this post. Though I’m not enough of a writer to even consider writing intricate, massive stories, someday I’d love to come close enough to imitating Tolkien to have people say that it just barely reminds them of LOTR in terms of world building and memorable characters and beauty. That would be enough for me. 🙂

      Oh my goodness, YES, Charles Dickens and his huge casts of characters that come back to haunt the rest of the book. XD I read David Copperfield last March, and then I listened to Richard Armitage’s reading of it on Audible (which was pure bliss), and every time Mr. Micawber came back into the story, I just thought, “Oh is it you again? I thought we’d had enough of you and your pecuniary troubles.” But don’t misunderstand me. I did really love that book. I’m just not sure I’ll read it again. 😀

      Your story sounds fascinating, judging from the information that you’ve shared! And thank you for this post.

  • Daeus Lamb changed their profile picture 2 weeks, 1 day ago

  • If I could add one category, it would be supernaturalists. Maybe it’s just the fiction I read, but I sense that there are few characters like me who wouldn’t blink an eye if a neighbor lady said a spirit came each night and ate the cat food from her cat food bowl. Of course, everyone should be skeptical of a claim like that and require evidence…[Read more]

  • I really appreciate everything that’s been said so far.

    I really dislike SJW fiction, even when I happen to agree with the conclusions. It just feels snobby. But I appreciate what @taylorclogston said about positive forced diversity. For instance, my natural rut is to write male protagonists. Now, I positively object to the idea that writing…[Read more]

  • Daeus Lamb replied to the topic Theme/Question in the forum Themes 2 weeks, 6 days ago

    @sarah-inkdragon I don’t see it. 😬

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