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Fantasy Writers

Stories and Fantasies

Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 270 total)
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  • #116241
    Crazywriter
    @crazywriter

    I dont know many that drive cars!

    #116247
    Mischievous Thwapling
    @mischievous-thwapling

    That all sounds really fun, Peter! I didn’t know CAP was that fun! And you’re good; I don’t mind the long answer! Honestly, since we moved to Story Embers, it kinda feels like everything slowed down, like we don’t really post a lot 🙁 So I like the long answer!  And my brothers have also flown planes! Twice, I think. That’s really awesome that you have too, I mean, how many kids can fly airplanes?!

    "I threw stones at the stars, but the whole sky fell."

    #116250
    Crazywriter
    @crazywriter

    You should have 5 free flights before you have to pay

    #116251
    Crazywriter
    @crazywriter

    So i know Natalie and Brooke have read this already, but heres my 1st chapter

     

    Chapter 1

    The Secret

    “Strike!” Barked the man with the salt-and-pepper beard . His grey cape swished behind him in a light, refreshing breeze.

    “Yah!” All the students yelled, as the drove their blades forcefully into their targets.

    “Strike!” The man called again.

    “Yah!” The students cried, plunging their swords into the firm dummy, ending the two count attack.

    “Quicker, Bledson! Tilt your blade to decrease the drag.”

    The big, sweating boy nodded, wiping his brow with a red and white speckled kerchief. The man scanned the group of exhausted students, then looked up at the waning light.

    “That’s enough for today. Class dismissed.” There was a class wide sigh of relief. “However, I will expect all of you for your final test tomorrow. Understood?” He barked.

    “Yes, Master Godwin!” They cried. The small band then sat wearily on the benches that surrounded the ancient training ground. It was enveloped by a forest, and narrow cobbled road led up to the other training halls. It had stone benches staggered around the grounds. One of the boys with a scar that stretched from his forehead to left cheek laughed. His name was Finn.

    “Leave it to Master to tire you out. My arms are so sore! Same with you?” He said. All the others nodded, wryly it seemed. “Bledson, you’re a slow one! Now if you strike like this—”

    He indicated the way he was showing. “You can decrease the drag. Now, you got magic, right?” The strong boy, Bledson, nodded his cheeks flushed. “Ah, you’re with me. See you guys. Be glad you don’t you don’t have magic.” With that he stood up, and, accompanied by Bledson, walked toward a tall hall near the edge of the walls. When he was out of earshot, the six remaining students breathed a sigh of relief.

    “I honestly would rather keep training than listen to Finn for another minute. He is such a bother!” A blond-haired boy, Oliver said.

    “No kidding. Wish he went to magic more often.” Replied Gwen. You could hardly see her face due to the straight red hair that fell to her chest.

    “Well, I got to go. See you tomorrow for the test?” Another girl asked.

    “Aye, Shannon. See you tomorrow.” Replied the Oliver. Shannon walked up the cobbled path to a small, wooden cottage, not too far away. Oliver turned to a boy with dark brown hair, who was polishing his sword, making it shine in the dim light. “Jack, are you going with Master Godwin? Cause my family would be glad to have you over.”

    Jack shook his head. “No, I’m good Oliver. Master Godwin and I have had Terry already make us dinner. But thanks anyway.”

    “Anytime.” Oliver said, picking up his blade, and placing it in an ornate leather sheath. His sword glinted with the small rubies on its handle, and the one large, engraved sapphire at its hilt. He walked up the cobbled road, whistling while he went. Jack lifted his more modest blade, glinting in the waning sun. He liked his sword. The marks and scratches were to him a chapter of a grand story. He too sheathed it, and walked a slightly more wild trail through the woods, toward a small cabin. He knew the trail well, and he inhaled the spring pollen in from the surrounding flowers. The deep brown of oaks mingled with the gentle silver of birch, and they made a beautiful mosaic of sunlight on the forest floor.  Leaves gently crunched beneath his leather boots as he stepped gingerly through the forest. He loved his walk back, not only because he wasn’t running, or swinging his sword, but also because he loved the sounds of the songbirds, the scolding of the squirrels, the hooting of owls.

    Godwin had told him the story of how he’d been found, a babe wrapped in cloths, hid under a scrub brush.

    One warrior, Godwin, volunteered to house the boy. And so he grew, and learned the ways of the village.

    Jack never had asked many questions about his origins. He didn’t even know if he wanted to know. For now, Godwin was his paternal figure, and Oliver’s mother, his maternal figure. To him, he needed nothing else.

    Still, sometimes he felt something gnawing on his soul, like he almost remembered who his parents were, but he never could recall.

    Jack shook himself out of his thoughts as the smell of frying trout filled the air.

    Jack hopped up the three short steps, squealing under his weight, and opened the strong oak door. Terry, Master Godwin’s maid, was standing at the stove, gently shaking some salt onto the sizzling fish. She turned and smiled at Jack, her weathered face wrinkling as she did.

    “Ah, young master Jack! How was training today?” She asked.

    “Good. Final test is tomorrow. Master’s not arrived yet?”

    “Aye. Still at the school I presume.”

    Jack nodded. He busied himself with setting the table with ornate, porcelain plates and glass cups. He looked up suddenly when the door opened and Master Godwin entered.

    “Dinner’s ready, Master!” Jack said. Godwin grunted, and sat down. Terry set two plates of steaming trout before them, as well as corn, rice, and a garnish of parsley.

    “I’ll be taking my leave, Godwin.” She said, as she walked out the door, and on to the path to her own home. Jack was about to dig in when Godwin interrupted him.

    “Jack, the blessing.” He said sternly.

    “I’m sorry, Master. Is it my turn?”

    Godwin nodded. Jack breathed heavily, then prayed. “Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread, and forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from the evil one. Amen.”

    Godwin grunted, and then tucked in to his plate. Jack did likewise, and tried to start conversation.

    “How was the day?”

    “Good. Like all of them.”

    “Anything interesting?”

    “Nothing you’d be interested in.”

    “Please Master, tell me!”

    Godwin sighed, then looked at Jack. “The aristocracy is being as demanding as ever, and save for the houses Winchester and Roanoke, have gone plumb insane. They are demanding that we postpone the tests, because some ridiculous marriage between them. More urgent they say.”

    “Its not like we’d be going anyways!” Jack exclaimed.

    “My point exactly. However, we must obey the laws of the land. The school is sending a petition tonight. In the morning we’ll see what happens.”

    Jack chewed a bite of his fish, then asked Godwin tentatively, “Was there ever a time we had a king?”

    At this, Godwin turned stoic.

    “It is not for us to know.”

    “But someone must! And you yourself have said you wished there was a king!”

    Godwin looked at him sternly. Then he sighed.

    “Ask your history teacher.”

    “I did. He said that it is not for us to know too. That’s why I’m asking you!”

    “Jack, have you ever realized that there are some things not meant for us to know? This is one of them.”

    Jack nodded sadly, turning back to his plate. A long silence ensued. Godwin sighed.

    “Fine. I’ll tell you. But what I am about to tell you, if overheard, may very well cost me my freedom. You must never tell anyone of this. Do you understand?” Jack nodded eagerly.

    Godwin spoke. “There once was a king, who ruled our peoples graciously. His name was King Reven the Great.

     

    #116258
    Mischievous Thwapling
    @mischievous-thwapling

    Awesome, Peter! Even though I’ve already read it, like you said, I still loved it! I’ll try to post the first chapter of a story I’m writing today or tomorrow. (it’s a new one, not the one I was posting in the Flabbit Room)

    "I threw stones at the stars, but the whole sky fell."

    #116261
    Crazywriter
    @crazywriter

    Thanks Natalie!

    #116263
    Mischievous Thwapling
    @mischievous-thwapling

    Yeah,  you’re welcome 🙂

    "I threw stones at the stars, but the whole sky fell."

    #116264
    Brooke
    @wingiby-iggiby

    Crazywriter: Yeah, my dad has me practicing. It is actually really fun! 😀

    And yay! We’re back to posting stories!

    I light the arrow, pull the bow,
    Shoot that fire right through my soul.

    #116266
    Crazywriter
    @crazywriter

    Ok cool  Brooke!

    #116270
    Birds Rock
    @birds-rock

    Just another Wingfeather Saga Forum refugee! I was also known as Birds Rock on there.

    #116271
    Crazywriter
    @crazywriter

    Hey Birds Rock!

    #116275
    Mischievous Thwapling
    @mischievous-thwapling

    @birds-rock

    Hello, Birds Rock! So glad you could make it here, too.  😀

    "I threw stones at the stars, but the whole sky fell."

    #116278
    Arindown (Gracie)
    @arindown

    @crazywriter

    Hey, I really liked your story. Are you working on the next chapter?

    One thing I noticed was that you didn’t follow Jack right from the beginning, so I was confused as to who was the main character (I thought it was Finn for a second😂). You don’t need to change it, just keep it in mind.

    Tag me if you post more.

    Not all those who wander are lost.

    #116280
    Brooke
    @wingiby-iggiby

    Howdy, Birds Rock! So glad you could make it! 😀

    I light the arrow, pull the bow,
    Shoot that fire right through my soul.

    #116282
    Crazywriter
    @crazywriter

    Ok I’ll keep it in mind Arindown! Thanks for the advice!

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