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Fantasy Writers

Why do you write?

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 51 total)
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  • #116163
    imwritehere1920
    @imwritehere1920

    @arindown

    arindown wrote: Haha. Pun intended?

    Yeah sure… we’ll go with that 😉

    Okay actually, I wasn’t striving for one; but I do love puns so it must have been my sub-conscience at work.


    @arindown
    wrote: Yes! Riley Poole! That guy is so funny.😄 I love the part where he can’t think of anything else, so he tells Abigail his name is Bill.

    Ooh, that was a good one.  Also, the scene where he knows some history about Ben Franklin and the others didn’t know (and he was so excited to be the ‘know-it-all’ in this case XD)

    And YES! The ending of the Warden and the Wolf King was such a tear-jerker! (Now I must go revisit the whole series again!)  Hey, is Andrew Petersen ever going to continue with the series?  It just felt like he was going to do another book, but I haven’t visited his website in a long time.

    We are all apprentices in a craft where no one ever becomes a master. — Ernest Hemingway

    #116164
    Anna Friend
    @a_nna

    @imwritehere1920

    So, do you like writing in third person better?

    Definitely. I find that I can get the perfect balance of inner character and external descriptions with third person, and I have more room to add more perspective characters. Lately, I’ve found first person completely foreign. It forces me to suddenly become much more focused on one character than any of my WIPs do, with their broad perspectives.

     

    @imwritehere1920 wrote: Then Gilbert comes blithely along, rowing his little boat

    girls screaming in the distance: Anne’s drowning!

    Gilbert: [smirking in the way only Gil can] Anne Shirley. What are you doing?

    Anne: [lifts her nose impossibly high in the air] Fishing for lake trout.

    One of my favorite scenes as well! xD And no worries–I’ve never read the books either! But I absolutely adore the movies. My sister has the whole series in paperback, but I just can’t bring myself to read them after learning Gilbert died super early.

     

    I forgot to ask you what the premise for Little Lord Fauntleroy was

    So the son of an English earl or some other gentry position moved to New England and married an American. He died young, leaving his wife and infant son. The son, Cedric, inherits his father’s title and moves to England at six or so to live with his grandfather. The story is about him holding to his father and mother’s standards while facing pressures from society and, in the process, healing the distance between his grandfather and his mother due to her marriage to his son. Cedric is precious–noble and gentle, quick-witted and insightful.


    @arindown

    A new question…what’s your all-time favorite scenes from books or movies?

    So in Morgan L. Busse’s Followers of the Word trilogy, there is a scene where an assassin is in this kind of between-worlds place. He’s at a river, and there is blood on his hands that he can’t wash off. He tries over and over and still the red stains him. Later, after he accepts the  calling on his life, the Word (God) washes it away completely for him.

    In Brandon Sanderon’s Way of Kings, there is a point in one of the MC’s lives (Kaladin, at that point a slave), when he’s on a cliff debating whether he should jump or not. This, at one of his lowest points, a friend unknowingly brings him a poisonous leaf. He crumples the leaf and throws it into the chasm. When he walks away, he has resolved to save the other slaves in his crew as well.

    When Thanos snaps his fingers…. and the end fight scene in Avengers: End Game.

    This isn’t a movie, but in Broadway’s version of Anastasia, when she and Dmitri are singing In A Crowd of Thousands, and Anastasia says something that happened in the past and Dmitri goes, “Uh, I didn’t tell you that” and she responds, “You didn’t have to. I remember!” Goosebumps!

     

    Favorite character out of any book/movie? OR, alternatively, what’s one book you always find yourself coming back to read?

     

    #116167
    Mel
    @melodyjoy

    @a_nna

    The book I always come back to read: Someone Named Eva. (fictional)

    It’s about this girl who was not a jew but looked like a German who was taken during WW2 and put in this camp. (There’s a name for them, starts with an L. I can’t remember… something like Lenesborn ) The camp was intended to practically turn her into a German girl to have her be apart of the Aryan race.
    It’s really interesting 🙂

    I’ve read it like at least 10 times if not way more:)

    MELODY

    Life is short, smile while you still have teeth!

    #116168
    Arindown (Gracie)
    @arindown

    @imwritehere1920

    Hey, is Andrew Petersen ever going to continue with the series?

    He says no (he didn’t tell me that personally, he told everyone😄). He did come out with Wingfeather Tales where he explores other places in his world along with other writers, and he also wrote Pembric’s Creaturpedia with illustrations by Aeden (his son). Have you seen the short-film he produced?


    @a_nna

    And no worries–I’ve never read the books either!

    No? I haven’t read the whole series, but the first three are amazing. I would definitely recommend. Rilla of Ingleside was also pretty good (the romance wasn’t as good as Anne of the Island).

    Lately, I’ve found first person completely foreign.

    I know the feeling. Right now, I’m doing all my WIP’s in third person, but I do plan to try out first. There’s a closeness to first person that you just can’t get in third. Have you ever read Old Yeller? That book has really good first person.

    Favorite character out of any book/movie? OR, alternatively, what’s one book you always find yourself coming back to read?

    I have so many…😏

    Frodo in the Lord of the Rings…they just did a really good job with him (I mean, Aragorn, Legolas and Gandalf were pretty amazing too).

    Kalmar in the Wingfeather Saga. I love his character arc, from a geeky, selfish kid, to the leader he needs to be.

    Did you say any book? Like, does that count my own?😛 My MC’s Dad is the best, as is my WIP’s MC, Thane.

    Books I keep coming back to are Rifles for Watie (historical fiction, it’s really good), Anne of Green Gables, Laura’s Choice (another historical fiction), Little Women, and probably These Happy Golden Years (Little House on the Prairie). Some books do romance really well, so I end up reading those when I need inspiration for my own.

    Not all those who wander are lost.

    #116169
    Anna Friend
    @a_nna

    @arindown @imwritehere1920

    The Wingfeather Saga that you’re talking about is the one that starts out with On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness, right? I listened to an audiobook for that one, but haven’t been able to find the others in physical form. Andrew Peterson’s writing vaguely reminds me of N. D. Wilson’s, ever you’ve ever read his books. Not so much the prose as the story, though.


    @arindown

    I haven’t read the whole series, but the first three are amazing. I would definitely recommend. Rilla of Ingleside was also pretty good

    I’ll have to finally add them to my “read before summer is over” list then (:

    There’s a closeness to first person that you just can’t get in third. Have you ever read Old Yeller? That book has really good first person.

    There is! But it’s definitely a practiced skill. Just one I tend to be too timid to practice often, haha. And yes! It really does.

     

    Books I keep coming back to are Rifles for Watie (historical fiction, it’s really good), Anne of Green Gables, Laura’s Choice (another historical fiction), Little Women, and probably These Happy Golden Years (Little House on the Prairie).

    Rifles for Watie sounded so familiar, I went glancing around the house (my books are everywhere) for it. Sure enough, I found it on one of the shelves. One of my friends must have given it to me with a stack of others and I haven’t gotten to it yet. It’s the only one on your list I haven’t read, so I think I’ll have to check it out.

     

    I tend to come back to Little Women, Ben-Hur, Sir Gibbie, the Light of Eidon (I regard this as bizarre (it’s location on this list), because I dislike much of the rest of the series this book is in, but I really love the MCs development), and The Castaways of the Flying Dutchman. Before I got bored of the popular romance genre (and Elizabeth Camden’s tendency to follow a strict formula in her books), I read Against the Tide a lot, as well.

     

     

    What’s your WIP about?

    #116170
    Rusted Knight
    @rusted-knight

    Why do I write? That is quite a tale. It starts when I was young and making up stories as I played with toys. Try one that has legos, playmobil and toy soldiers all at once. Throw in two sisters and a large wood castle and boy you’ll get some stories.

    As I got older, two things happened. First I developed near or fully autistic memory so I could remember weird, little known things and recite them without error. (Sharks, snake, war, in that order.) Second I noticed how much trash was thrown into what would otherwise be wholesome entertainment. So I have set out on a quest to revive classical novels or make a last stand.

    The Devil saw me with my head down and got excited. Then I said Amen

    #116171
    Anna Friend
    @a_nna

    @rusted-knight

    That is a very admirable and inspiring quest. And one I hope you succeed in. You’re very right about trash being “thrown into what would otherwise be wholesome entertainment”–that was one reason I found to help me move from writing as a fluffy-side hobby to writing seriously. Which classical novels do you prefer most?

    #116177
    imwritehere1920
    @imwritehere1920

    @a_nna

    Anna Friend wrote: I find that I can get the perfect balance of inner character and external descriptions with third person, and I have more room to add more perspective characters.

    Cool.  It’s the opposite for me.  I used to write third person, but found that some of my stories needed first person viewpoint instead.

    As for Little Lord Fauntleroy, I’ll check it out.  Thanks for the premise!


    @a_nna
    wrote:  Favorite character out of any book/movie? OR, alternatively, what’s one book you always find yourself coming back to read?

    And yes, On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness is the first Wingfeather Saga book (which is a series I seriously need to revisit!)

    Rey, Rose, Admiral Holdo, and of COURSE Leia!!  (I’m a Star Wars fan)  I also like Lucy Pevensie  🙂

     


    @arindown

    No, I haven’t seen Petersen’s short film; but now I’m gonna see if I can find it!  (To bad he’s not continuing the series)

     


    @rusted-knight

    Hi there!  I’m Lily.  It’s nice to meet you.

    Wow, I used to make up stories with my toys too!  And I also grew up with sisters (and they help keep your imagination sharp!)

    If you don’t mind me asking, what is autistic memory?  I’m not very familiar with autism, though I would like to understand more (you don’t have to answer if you don’t want too)  🙂

    And I agree that there’s a lot of trash out there.  We need better writers; Good luck with your quest!

    We are all apprentices in a craft where no one ever becomes a master. — Ernest Hemingway

    #116191
    imwritehere1920
    @imwritehere1920

    @arindown  @rusted-knight  @melodyjoy  @a_nna  @writergirl101  (and anyone else who wants to answer

    One more question (at least for now)

    Why do you write fantasy?  What first drew you to this genre or inspired you  write it?

    We are all apprentices in a craft where no one ever becomes a master. — Ernest Hemingway

    #116194
    Arindown (Gracie)
    @arindown

    @a_nna

    It’s the only one on your list I haven’t read, so I think I’ll have to check it out.

    Oh do! I really like it, and I think (my opinion) that Harold Keith did the everything really well. It definitely deserved the Newberry Medal.


    @imwritehere1920

    Why do you write fantasy?  What first drew you to this genre or inspired you  write it?

    Hmmm…I think I write fantasy because of books that I’ve read that have changed my prospective on the world and the Bible (Wingfeather Saga for example). Good fantasy, I believe, just tells timeless truths in a new way. That’s my goal.

    Not all those who wander are lost.

    #116207
    Rusted Knight
    @rusted-knight

    @imwritehere1920

    Autistic memory is something unique. People with autism remember exact details and can rattle them off just at good as any computer. If you have seen Chosen, Matthew is clearly autistic. Mine is a lesser case but I have a rather useful ability.

    The Devil saw me with my head down and got excited. Then I said Amen

    #116219
    imwritehere1920
    @imwritehere1920

    @rusted-knight

    Ah, I see.  That’s amazing.  So would you say that it’s kinda like having a photographic memory? I haven’t seen Chosen yet (is it the series about the life of Jesus?)

     


    @arindown

    arindown wrote: Good fantasy, I believe, just tells timeless truths in a new way.

    I agree with you there 🙂

    We are all apprentices in a craft where no one ever becomes a master. — Ernest Hemingway

    #116221
    Ella
    @writergirl101

    One more question (at least for now) Why do you write fantasy? What first drew you to this genre or inspired you write it?

    I write fantasy because the worldbuilding is so fun.  And because I don’t have to stick to any rules. 😉

    Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn.

    #116273
    Anna Friend
    @a_nna

    @imwritehere1920 wrote:

    Why do you write fantasy?  What first drew you to this genre or inspired you  write it?


    @writergirl101
    @arindown

    Well said, both of you!

    I’m not really sure why I write fantasy. It’s what comes easiest to me. Nearly every story I ever thought up fell into fantasy. The worldbuilding I do around my characters allows my stories  to come to life in ways that they don’t when I write, say, historical or contemporary fiction. As far away from this world that fantasy enables me to be, it seems to connect me more to it and its truths than I can in other fiction.

     

    @imwritehere192 Why do you write fantasy?

    #116290
    imwritehere1920
    @imwritehere1920

    @writergirl101  @a_nna

    So true!  World building (and making up your own rules) is a lot of fun.  And it really lets you explore certain themes that is harder to capture in other genres.

    Anna Friend wrote: @imwritehere192 Why do you write fantasy?

    I write fantasy, because it was the first genre that I fell in love with (Narnia, the Squire’s Tales, etc).  It just unlocks your imagination with so many possibilities 🙂

    We are all apprentices in a craft where no one ever becomes a master. — Ernest Hemingway

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