Fantasy Writers

Moon-Men, Blue Pencils, and Backpacking Boys

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  • #119817
    Wingiby Iggiby
    @wingiby-iggiby

      Hello! This is Wingiby Iggiby, as you could probably tell. I just had a bit of a story to share with y’all; a concept, perhaps, for an entire book. But I have never gotten that far, so we’ll have to see. However, I just wanted to know what other’s thoughts were on my writing, and I wanted to share some of it with somebody bc I just really wanted to. I’m open to any, absolutely any critique y’all have. Grammar, spelling, etc. But what I’m mostly looking for is advice on how I might make it flow better; if it’s understandable; any thoughts on how I might make it more interesting; if something didn’t make sense; whatever stands out to you about it as to something I might do better. Obviously, I don’t expect y’all to answer all of that. Namely, just something that stands out. That’s all. Thank you for your time 😉

      *****************************************************************************************************

      Holly Simone Merrykin — aged 11 — couldn’t sleep. The air was stuffy with the warm summer heat, and her hair was plastered to her cheeks. The window was open, but the breeze that occasionally filtered through it was humid and hot. It didn’t help that her older sister, Ellie Hadria Merrykin  — aged 13 — wouldn’t stop snoring from the bottom bunk. Holly stared at the bare ceiling above her, searching for at least one little dust speck just to occupy her time. But there wasn’t a single particle, and Holly kicked the thin sheet off of her legs. Then she turned over with a loud thump, half-hoping it would wake Ellie to make her stop snoring. It didn’t work, so Holly sat up and swung herself down the ladder, taking a moment to glance at her sister, who was laying on her back and rumbling very unflatteringly. Holly grinned, and eased her bare toes to the floor. Wincing at every creak the wood-planks made, she tip-toed over to the desk and snatched her drawing-pad and pencil, then creeped across the room to the sliding screen door. The small bedroom contained the old bunk-bed, a wardrobe, Sam’s bed, and a large antique-like mahogany desk that seemed out of place against the white wall painted over with mismatched flowers. There was also a small porch no bigger than a closet that could fit about one chair. Holly was pushing open the sliding door to it, thankful it had been recently oiled. Oddly enough, she now wished her sister to stay asleep. There was something pleasant about being awake all by yourself when you weren’t just lying in bed as bored as a rock.

      The moon was still bright and there was a spattering of stars; but in the east, the sky was turning a pale blue. Holly sat in the old cushioned easy chair and breathed in the fresh air. It was slightly less stuffy outside. She licked her fingers to get them a bit damp and turned to a fresh page in her book. It wasn’t clean, because it was smeared with graphite from a previous drawing of wonder woman. Holly tapped her pencil on it, waiting for inspiration. Then she glanced up at the moon and smiled. She bent over her paper and started to draw, delighting in the skritch skritch of the pencil. Slowly but surely, a lean, tall figure appeared. He had a long face and sharp nose; but his shining cheeks, wide grin, and twinkling eyes suggested he was quite amiable. His clothes were nothing fancy, and he went barefoot with a knapsack slung over one shoulder. In his hand he carried a silver moon-rock, and he stood on a gray, pot-holed covered surface.

      It was Holly’s moon-man. Contrary to common belief, she did not think of him as some fat man with bursting buttons. She did not think he filled the entire moon’s surface with his insane smirk. Instead, she felt he was a common man, much like her father. And he had to have some aim in life other than grinning madly at folks far below him. What was he doing up there all the time? she thought. And what was in his knapsack? Why was he holding that rock in his hand? Why was he so happy? Wasn’t life on a giant boulder boring?

      Holly put her chin in her hands and gazed dreamily at the waning moon. Perhaps the moon-man was picking up the scattered meteors that tore into the moon’s surface and kept it from shining brightly. Maybe that was why it didn’t reflect as much light sometimes. The rocks were what was in his knapsack. That night he had done his job well. And he was probably extra happy because he had a moon-woman for a wife and several moon-babies to entertain him. So life was joyful, and he probably delighted in keeping the moon clean for those down on earth. Surely, though, the moon could not be made of cheese. So what did he eat? What did he feed his little moon-babies? As she contemplated this much more difficult theory, Holly heard a noise. It sounded like the crunch of dry leaves. She would’ve brushed it off as a nocturnal squirrel had it not continued, sometimes stopping, sometimes going: much like a creature trying to sneak along without being heard but failing miserably in it.

      Holly looked nervously toward the door. Part of her wanted to go back inside and bury her head under her pillow. She was no brave person; not like Sam, who had insisted in sleeping downstairs on the couch. Samantha Eliza Merrykin — aged 11 — was courageous like that: she would brave being all alone in the silent downstairs just to be near the air conditioner. Holly, however, hardly had the courage to show her siblings her artwork. But she was also very curious, and that curiosity overcame her. She forgot that it had also killed many cats. Holly quietly got up from her seat and peered cautiously over the white railing into the yard — which was a startling nine-feet below. She nearly squealed at what she saw.

      A boy stood in the middle of their backyard in the small clearing before the pines and few hardwoods began. He had a large, overstuffed backpack hanging off of one shoulder, and a mop of striking reddish-gold hair. Like a sun-boy’s hair, Holly thought. He probably has a sun-sister, and maybe they go to visit the moon-man’s children. He’s a rather good-looking sun-boy… 

      As she thought about handsome sun and moon children, Holly jerked her elbow without thinking and knocked the pencil she had set on the railing. Her favorite sea-blue pencil was now plummeting toward earth with startling speed. Yet to Holly, it seemed to be done in slow-motion like those guys on Youtube that Horace watched. She saw it hit the leaves with a soft poof right in front of the boy. He jumped in surprise, then bent over to pick it up. He examined it for a few seconds, and then looked up at Holly. She saw his pale face with the amber eyes, and she watched as they widened. He looked from her to the pencil; then his cheeks flushed as red as his hair.

      “Uh, I’m sorry. Is this yours?”

      Holly didn’t know what to say. She was still frightened and nearly speechless. But she straightened her shoulders and asked in as authoritative a voice as she could muster, “what, may I ask, are you doing in my yard?” She immediately wished she had left off the “may I ask” part, but it was too late for that. She watched the boy as he shuffled his feet, making the leaves rattle conspicuously.

      “Um, I’ll just put this here,” he said, finally, as he placed the pencil on the ground, completely avoiding the question.

      Holly could only last a few more minutes before dashing inside to wake up Ellie, or even Sam. “What are you doing in my yard?” she asked again with a slight shakiness to her voice. She didn’t sound very sure of herself at all, and she knew it.

      “Oh, nothing really. Just passing through. Well, goodnight! Er, goodmorning.”

      And with that, he nodded at her, his hair bobbing, and started shuffling off again, seemingly unaware of any more stealth since he had been spotted. Holly watched as he plodded his way through the other backyards until he turned a corner and disappeared. Then she sighed a deep sigh of relief, and turned to go back inside. The sun was now peeping over the tops of the trees, but she didn’t have the nerve yet to go pick up her pencil. She would wait till she could possibly get Horace to do it for her, or somebody else. Holly was still scared.

      She just really wasn’t that brave.

      *****************************************************************************************************

      If you read all of that, I sincerely congratulate you and thank you 😉 Thank you! 😀

      I know you got mountains to climb,
      But always stay humble and kind -- Tim McGraw

      #119842
      Mischievous Thwapling
      @mischievous-thwapling

        @wingiby-iggiby

        Wow, I LOVED that!!!!! The title was really, really eye-catching and interesting, and I’m already super endeared to Holly.  What an amazing character!  I love how she thinks–the Moon-man, and his Moon children, and the “good-looking sun boy.”  XD.

        I don’t think I have any advice to give.  I think I saw a few places where commas were unneeded,  but, as I’m not completely sure about whether they or are not needed, and you were asking for different advice than that, I think I’m not going to point them out.  How embarrassing would it be to tell you they’re not needed, then find out that they are!  Lol XD

        But seriously, I loved it! (I’m using the word “Love” a lot, aren’t I?) Will I get to read more? *Hint hint, nudge nudge, wink wink, cough cough* (From that, you may think I’m spasming out, but it’s really a plea to post more)

        Question time!!
        What did you mean by “a concept, perhaps, for an entire book”? Like just an idea for a plot, but you’re still writing it, so this isn’t like a first draft or something?

        Second, is this what you’re working on, so The Point of Travores (So sorry if I got spelling wrong, please correct me if I did) is on hold?

        Third, why did you say: “If you read all of that, I sincerely congratulate you and thank you”.   Think about it, Wingiby, remember when I posted (On the Flabbit Room) the part of my previous story with Evlarin and the Shadow Wolves-y things?  That was like twice as long as what you posted. (Then, I was still new to proper website manners so I had nooo idea how rude it was to post something that long) So don’t worry about the length!  (Secretly, I love long posts).  If you were angelic and kind enough to read that silly old post on the Flabbit Room, the least I can do is read your fantastic post!

        Sorry I didn’t really have any advice to give… I just didn’t see anything wrong!

         

        No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader ~RF

        #119859
        Wingiby Iggiby
        @wingiby-iggiby

          Thank you so much, @mischievous-thwapling ! It was really fun to wright it, lol And I totally get that about the commas! Actually, I have a record of being “comma happy,” as my mom puts it. I use too many too often 😛 So if you found one that might not have been needed, there’s a good chance you’re right.

          Ha ha! I can post more when I write it; maybe just start a new “share your stories” topic so I don’t have to go spending five minutes of my life looking for the old one…… And I seriously don’t know another word for “love,” so I’m in the same boat with you on that 😛

          What did you mean by “a concept, perhaps, for an entire book”? Like just an idea for a plot, but you’re still writing it, so this isn’t like a first draft or something?

          Yes! This is the first part I wrote, its just an idea for a potential story — all I’ve typed out so far is what I posted and a short introduction. It’s inspired by The Penderwicks by Jeanne Birdsall, a series I was reminded about how much I loved it when I was younger when my sister started reading them. That is a really awkward sentence, but I’m too lazy to change it. 😛

          Second, is this what you’re working on, so The Point of Travores (So sorry if I got spelling wrong, please correct me if I did) is on hold?

          Yes! You spelled it right! And yeah, it’s on hold, lol But I think I’ll keep the story jouncing around in my mind, bc someday I think it might work out well if I actually commit to proper world building……

          Oh yeah!! I remember your post about Evlarin! And it wasn’t silly at all!!!! It was super cool, and you ought to write some more about it!!!! And thanks for reading mine, I suppose it wasn’t too long, but it was about two-and-a-half pages on Google Docs…… Ahem. Anyhow, thank you for your time, and I’m so glad you liked it! FYI, now I’m wearing a smug smile ’cause I’m “angelic” 😛

          I know you got mountains to climb,
          But always stay humble and kind -- Tim McGraw

          #119868
          Mischievous Thwapling
          @mischievous-thwapling

            @wingiby-iggiby

            Yes! I do the same thing; it use way too many commas, though I don’t know why, lol.

            Yeah! Good idea, and definitely tag me when you do.  And yes, there are other words for love, but in this case (and so many others) the actual word love is really the only one that fits, you’re completely right.

            Ha ha!  I actually have The Penderwicks on my shelf, though I haven’t read it… I will get to that 😛

            Lol, yes, I completely get what you mean.  For The Point of Travores, do you have everything planned out, or some things a bit vague?  And yes, there’s a point for me when world-building just gets frustrating.  I think I get too into making realistic or perfect, or something, bc it usually ends in some frustration 😛

            Aw, thank you!!  It was my first story I’ve ever attempted, so looking back on it (Even though it really wasn’t that long ago :P) I see so many things that make me shake my head.  I actually had this whole quest thing-y planned, where Evlarin would meet people from all the tribes (Remember them? 😛 The Forestians, (Or however I spelled,  I can’t remember.  Haha, as you can tell, I’m horrible at spelling) the Fireanians, the Water Elves, then of course, the Humans). I had this thing planned where they would have to sail across the ocean to another continent, blah blah, and meet the leader for that country, who would tell them about the ancient prophecy predicting the rise of the Shadow Wolves, and how 4 people from each tribe would be chosen to be the Wielders of the Stones of Katir’kar  (They were supposedly powerful objects, and there 4 for each tribe) to defeat the Shadows.  So they were suppose to go on this epic quest, blah blah.  They were gonna have to face these trials or something, before they could take their stones that were kinda gonna be like the worse fear thing we’re doing on Character Castle 2.0.  Long story short, they were going to take ’em home to defeat the Shadow Wolves and their Shadow King, but my Water Elf character had sacrificed himself on the way, so they had to find another Water Elf of his same family tree.  So guess what?  Remember Sahina?  They got her to be the Water Elf Wielder of Water Elf stone.  ‘Cause she was actually his sister (gasp, plot twist ! :P)  But at the end, ’cause my Water Elf character had been turned into a Shadow Wolf, he was transformed back, blah blah.  Looking back on it, it makes me smile.

            Two and a half pages is a decent amount of writing!  Before I started writing, I thought that didn’t sound too bad, but now that I do, I’ve learned how much work goes into something like that.  It’s harder than I thought it would be 😛

            And yeah, no problem!  I’m very happy I spent my time that way 😛 And lol, yes, you are quite angelic 😛

             

            No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader ~RF

            #119869
            Mischievous Thwapling
            @mischievous-thwapling

              BTW love that new quote.

              No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader ~RF

              #119877
              Lona
              @lonathecat

                @wingiby-iggiby

                I really enjoyed it! And no apologizing for length. When you enjoy something, length is meaningless. For example, let’s just compare this to a reading assignment I had this morning. 5 paragraphs of instructions on preparing a microscope slide that was over-saturated with sophisticated words no one uses. *Brief pause to consider that neuron-harming experience*

                Anyways. 🙂

                I love your moon-man and sun-boy idea! Personally, I love making things that “aren’t” things that “are”, like making Life a person. They’re such fun concepts. 😀

                I only noticed one typo;

                “She was no brave person; not like Sam, who had insisted in sleeping downstairs on the couch.”

                I think what you’re looking for here is “insisted on.” 🙂

                I can’t say anything about commas, I’m terrible at them. Though, if you and Thwapling are comma happy, am I comma depressed? My poor commas…I will have to get them some therapy or something.

                The only other comment I have is that maybe at the beginning, mention how she switches from trying to wake her sister up from trying to stay awake before she’s outside? Like she’s’ hit with an idea or something? It just seems a little zig-zaggy to me since Holly goes straight from intentionally trying to wake her sister, to intentionally trying to keep her asleep, in two sentences, and with no bridge.

                That’s all. I really liked it!

                Oh actually no, one more thing. If you want to go into Greek, Thwapling and Wingiby-Iggiby, you could have 3 words for love. 🙂

                 

                #119880
                Mischievous Thwapling
                @mischievous-thwapling

                  @lonathecat

                  Oh, I didn’t even notice those XD

                  But wait, you’re right! I have learned the names and meanings of the three Greek words for love, but I’d forgotten them till you mentioned ’em! Thanks for reminding me 🙂 Doesn’t one mean romance or something, one servant like love, and one brotherly? I’m probably wrong, but that’s all I really remember, haha

                  No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader ~RF

                  #119882
                  Lona
                  @lonathecat

                    @mischievous-thwapling

                    My parents are linguists so I never hear the end of it lol.

                    You got them all though! Good job. 😀

                    #119883
                    Mischievous Thwapling
                    @mischievous-thwapling

                      @lonathecat

                      Ha ha, that’s funny!

                      Thanks!  😛

                      No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader ~RF

                      #120313
                      Wingiby Iggiby
                      @wingiby-iggiby

                        @mischievous-thwapling

                        Commas are so commonly used, yet they are such a pain!!!!!!! And some writers seem to be comma fanatics while others prefer unending sentences 😛

                        For The Point of Travores, I think I have the skeleton down, though I’m missing a few bones and basically all of the flesh 😛 I’m going to re-do the entire thing, now that I think I know what I’m doing. And yeah, you feel sorta like you gotta get every little detail in; but I’ve found that if you just sit on it, things pop into your head unbidden, and you start to get some bones or at least a couple ligaments. Or, like Andrew Peterson did, starting with a map might be helpful; although I’ve never drawn a map from imagination and I have no idea how big the paper would have to be 😛

                        And, actually, your story sounds really engaging (and it looks as if you’ve got at least the entire skeleton)! Don’t laugh at it; if anything, you could keep it in mind and maybe after a while you’ll see it from a different perspective and how you could write it again. That’s what happened with The Point. I love the idea of Sahina being his brother, and that word: Katir’kar. So cool! But where does Evlarin fit into all of it? I’m just curious, bc it’s got to be something interesting 😀 And shadow wolves were once people? What?……

                        Yes!!! It’s amazing how long it takes to do ONE LONELY PAGE!

                        And thanks (about the quote)!

                        @lona-the-cat

                        I’m so glad you didn’t mind the length!! And don’t all fancy instrument instructions use uncanny and unnerving words? 😛 How much instruction does it take to use a microscope!? Now, I’ve never had to use one, so I don’t know.

                        I love your moon-man and sun-boy idea! Personally, I love making things that “aren’t” things that “are”, like making Life a person. They’re such fun concepts.

                        Thank you! And it is fun; it makes things come alive….

                        I only noticed one typo:

                        “She was no brave person; not like Sam, who had insisted in sleeping downstairs on the couch.”

                        Aha! Thank you!

                        I can’t say anything about commas, I’m terrible at them. Though, if you and Thwapling are comma happy, am I comma depressed? My poor commas…I will have to get them some therapy or something.

                        Ha ha, you are funny. Comma therapy…. 😛 Commas are such persnickety little things. And thank you for the suggestion on Holly and her sister! Looking back, yeah, that was awkward 😛

                        And you guys are into Greek? Super cool! You might be able to read an original Bible someday, lol. I’m doing Latin, and love in Latin is “amo,” if I remember right. Actually, it means “I love,” so yeah…. And then you have all these different forms and stuff…… is Greek like that?

                        Sorry it took me so long to get back to y’all! Thank you, again, for your time 😉

                         

                        • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 3 days ago by Wingiby Iggiby. Reason: Missed a letter... And I just like typing in this teeny tiny little box 😛

                        I know you got mountains to climb,
                        But always stay humble and kind -- Tim McGraw

                        #120349
                        Lona
                        @lonathecat

                          @wingiby-iggiby

                          Your welcome! I’m glad I could be of some help. 🙂

                          Thank you! And it is fun; it makes things come alive….

                          You’re pretty funny yourself. 😛

                          Also, I want to say thank you for the word ‘persnickety’. I hadn’t heard it before, and now it is possibly one of my favorites just because of how fun it is to say.

                          Oh goodness, no haha. I just know a few words in Greek because my parents are linguists and I hear them talking about it. They know like 5 different languages, Greek being one of them. (Makes me wonder why I pick up words, but not grammar *glares at commas*. ) I know Spanish and I dabble in German, but no Greek for me. 😛

                          So, no idea about Greek forms haha, but I think you’re right on ‘amo’. ‘Amo’ means ‘I love’ in Spanish too, and Spanish is Latin based, so that checks out.

                          Out of curiosity, what got you interested in Latin? 🙂

                          • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 3 days ago by Lona.
                          #120359
                          Mischievous Thwapling
                          @mischievous-thwapling

                            @wingiby-iggiby

                            So true! I like to compare book series I’ve read, and one thing I was noticing the other day was how one used a TON, but in the other there’re were any barely commas!

                            Really? The whole thing?! Wow! How far are you in, then?  I remember loving The Point of Travores when you posted it on the Flabbit Room, though I don’t remember how many chapters you had down.  And yes, you’re right again!  In my WIP, I had this nasty little problem where I wasn’t sure how I would make a certain thing happen, that absolutely needed to happen, but when I just gave up on plotting for a bit, and just wrote until I got to that part, it worked out.  I thought of the solution as I was writing, which was quite nice 🙂

                            And NICE!! Honesty, I respect you for having your skeleton.  In my WIP, I have more of a concept, rather than something solid like bones… It’s just kinda floating everywhere in my brain 😛

                            And yes, the map thing’s a very good way for me to start world building. Really helps.

                            Thanks!! I know what you mean about seeing your story from a different perspective.  I do this thing where an idea I completely love slaps me in the face one day, so I write a lot of things down (characters, plot, the usual). But when I’m a couple of chapters in, I start feeling like its cheesy, and, when I see other people’s stories on SE, I start thinking thoughts like:

                            Wow, that person’s story is amazing.  How come mine isn’t like that?  

                            Or I think:  Why did’t I think of having that element in my story? 

                            And so on it goes 😛 So, finally, I’m just sticking to the story I have, even though sometimes I really want to quit, haha XD

                            Thanks! Evlarin actually fit into it by being one of the people in the prophecy, one of the Keepers of the Stones of Katir’kar. (Thanks for saying that’s a cool word, BTW :D) And yes, they once were human… *ominous sound effect: bum bum, buuum* 😛

                            I KNOW!! For my WIP, I’m writing each chapter like the ones in official books, and now I have a new appreciation for authors..

                             

                             

                             

                             

                             

                            No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader ~RF

                            #120397
                            Wingiby Iggiby
                            @wingiby-iggiby

                              @lonathecat

                              You’re pretty funny yourself.

                              Thank you! 😛

                              “Persnickety, persnickety, persnickety!!!!!!” Ha, you’re right! “Persnickety, persnickety, persnickety…..”

                              Ooo, that’s so cool that your parents are linguists! What do they do? I have no idea how it is possible to know that many. And it’s great to know Spanish!

                              So, no idea about Greek forms haha, but I think you’re right on ‘amo’. ‘Amo’ means ‘I love’ in Spanish too, and Spanish is Latin based, so that checks out.

                              Ah, yes! And that is actually one of the reasons why I’m doing Latin: because it is the “love language,” apparently. My mom was the one to get me and my sister started, because it’s important and it (of course) can help grammar 😛 which I do need help with……

                              Also, isn’t it funny how we’re holding two separate conversations on this forum? 😛

                              I know you got mountains to climb,
                              But always stay humble and kind -- Tim McGraw

                              #120400
                              Wingiby Iggiby
                              @wingiby-iggiby

                                @mischievous-thwapling

                                Well, I don’t have the whole thing down; it’s more like I know we need to get from point a. to point b. (as my dad would say) — but I’m not sure how. There are still a lot of kinks; and as for restarting it, I’ve done a couple introductions. That’s it. 😛 And I’m so glad you loved it! I had about twenty-two or three chapters down….. And that’s awesome that you figured it out! That’s what I need to do, so I’d better start actually writing 😛

                                And NICE!! Honesty, I respect you for having your skeleton.  In my WIP, I have more of a concept, rather than something solid like bones… It’s just kinda floating everywhere in my brain

                                Ha ha, that’s funny 😛 I probably shouldn’t have said I have a complete skeleton though, bc now, looking over it, I really don’t — or at least it’s jellyish. Same as you, I’ve got floating ideas — but lots of black holes.

                                And yes, the map thing’s a very good way for me to start world building. Really helps.

                                You’ve done maps before?! Ok, tell me about it *plops down on floor and gets out note-pad*

                                I do that too! I look at other’s work and think the same!!!! *wipes brow* I am not alone. “An artist is his worst critic,” lol, and that’s the truth. But I don’t do characters or anything *sheepish smile* I just go, and that’s the problem (that is also why I have loads of unfinished stores or barely begun stories). I am a very beginner writer.

                                Thanks! Evlarin actually fit into it by being one of the people in the prophecy, one of the Keepers of the Stones of Katir’kar. (Thanks for saying that’s a cool word, BTW :D) And yes, they once were human… *ominous sound effect: bum bum, buuum*

                                Oh….! And your welcome, bc it is a cool word 😉

                                I KNOW!! For my WIP, I’m writing each chapter like the ones in official books, and now I have a new appreciation for authors..

                                Right?! Have you heard of Kenneth Grahame? I haven’t read his books, but I did do a passage from one of them (The Wind in the Willows) for my dictation, and WOW! That guy must have been a living dictionary; to do that one paragraph that he did would have taken me a week of ceaseless work.

                                 

                                I know you got mountains to climb,
                                But always stay humble and kind -- Tim McGraw

                                #120452
                                Mischievous Thwapling
                                @mischievous-thwapling

                                  @wingiby-iggiby

                                  Yes!! I completely get that!  That’s basically my plotting.  I know what point A and point B are, but when it comes to all the stuff in-between, I just think, “Eh, I’ll make it up when I get there.” Which probably just means that I’m too lazy to do it XD

                                  Yes, exactly! Jelly-like and spattered with deep, black, and seemingly unsolvable holes..

                                  *sits down beside you and pulls out large piece of paper and points to multiple spots as I start speaking* So, I guess I did a map with Evlarin’s story.  I drew several continents and randomly jotted down names for them, then I added some broad details to the continents which would barely or never come into the story. (Details as in vague regions, etc) Then with places that were definitely in my story, I created cities and regions and territories and all the stuff in between.  So.. yep.  I’m considering making a map for my WIP, but first I have to solidify some stuff for the plot first, as I made some changes.

                                  Yeeeessssssss! That is so truth: “An artist is his worst critic.”

                                  And yes, I get that.  I have so many barely begun stories… But one good thing is that I’ll take a concept or character from one I don’t wanna do, then incorporate it into the current one, which is always fun to do.

                                  Hahaha!  I also understand not writing down characters or anything.  I usually write down the bare minimum, then add to it later as I develop the character and dive into their hopes and fears and all the rest of that. 😛

                                  Lol, thanks!

                                  And yes! I started The Wind in the Willows a long time ago, and I’m sad to say that it’s collecting dust on my shelf.  I suppose I was only 9, but to me it was rather “nutritious” for my brain, as vegetables are for my body.  I was (and am) still a little too used to “candy literature” XD  But wow, I can’t imagine doing that for dictation.. *pats your hand consolingly* I pity you. 😛

                                   

                                   

                                  No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader ~RF

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