fb

Fantasy Writers

Naming Conventions

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #105937
    R.M. Archer
    @r-m-archer

    Just for fun, does anyone else here love inventing naming conventions (things like all the names in a family starting with the same letter, or people remaining unnamed until a certain age, etc.)? What are some cool naming conventions you’ve used in your stories?

    Fantasy/dystopian/sci-fi author. Mythology nerd. Worldbuilding enthusiast. Singer. Fan of classic literat

    #105943
    Michael Erasmus
    @michael-erasmus

    I used a silly naming convention in one of the stories I played around with, where the people naming stuff were remarkably uncreative, giving literal descriptions as names. It was funny at first but got annoying.

    On a side note, I love how Roman names tend to have suffixes related to gender, many being forms of -us and -ia (Julius and Julia).

    What conventions do you use?

    #105996
    R.M. Archer
    @r-m-archer

    Oh dear. XD

    Yeah, suffixes are cool. Those should be used more often.

    I’ve used a few. I have a nation in which any children of nobility are given gem names (or names related to or modified from gemstones) and another nation in which each noble family has a certain letter all their names start with (which gets confusing when more than one or two of the characters are introduced in a story, because these noble families also tend to have a lot of kids; that system is probably my least favorite, logistically speaking).

    There’s a naming system I’m working on, though, where children aren’t given “public” names until they hit a certain age. They’re given a family nickname, only used by family members and their most trusted friends, and outside of the family they’re referred to by their relation to a named family member (generally whatever relation the people meeting the individual will most recognize). For instance, if a girl was being introduced to her named sister’s friends, she might be called “Elora’s third sister.” Once an individual reaches a certain age, they’re given a public name by some sort of official and afterward they use that name (though nicknames are still often used by the family and can still be given to close friends as a show of trust). I haven’t built up the culture around the system yet, but I’m finding the system itself a lot of fun to play with.

    Fantasy/dystopian/sci-fi author. Mythology nerd. Worldbuilding enthusiast. Singer. Fan of classic literat

    #106010
    Veraza Winterknight
    @kari-karast

    I have this organization of what’re basically medieval ninja and I like their naming system a lot. Basically, they take in reallllly young kids who’re orphaned or abandoned or born into the organization if their parents let them, and then they train them. At first they call them their given name intermixed with Blade # or Trainee # with # being whatever number they are. And then when the kid’s old enough/ready, they’re allowed to choose their own name. So it’s like a code name but also their own name, and they often have a special meaning behind them. (They’re also still told they’re given name, too, so they can use that with really close family and friends.)

    "You can dance with my henchman."

    #106047
    Katthewriter
    @katthewriter

    @r-m-archer

    I only have two fantasy books… so not really.

    One, Scars, which has a little written but not much planned out.  Is like princes kings and queens kind of fantasy.

    Then the other is like more actual fantasy. The MC, Sheela, has a human and Shire (biggest horse in the world) form and that is normal for her people to have another form that makes them quicker, sneaker, able to fly, ect. Her best ftiend, Darrik, his other form was a big snowy owl. But in the story she’s on earth. Human’s attacked their planet, and took lots of them back to Earth for testing, and killing those who fought back. Sheela was one of those that they took.  So fantasy character in real world. With more planned out storyline wise but none written cuz i aalready have 2 or 3 main projects… and if i did all mine that i have some planned out then i would have line 15 main projects xD

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 9 months ago by Katthewriter.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 9 months ago by Katthewriter.
    #106264
    PenSword
    @pensword

    One people group in my novel use a Russian inspired family name system, where the children get a patronymic, except in my world it would be a matronymic. And the matronymic comes before their given name, then their family name. So Ingvar’s daughter’s first name is Ingvariyna but she’s known as Eirwen. Still working out the masculine versions of the matronymics.

    The same people also see it as something like a dishonor to name a child after their parent. It’s seen as the parent failing at life so much that they need to give their child the same name in order to redeem that name.

    #106276
    R.M. Archer
    @r-m-archer

    @pensword Ooh, that’s super interesting!

    Fantasy/dystopian/sci-fi author. Mythology nerd. Worldbuilding enthusiast. Singer. Fan of classic literat

    #106771
    PenSword
    @pensword

    @r-m-archer

    Thanks!

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Enroll in Our Seven-Day Mindset Challenge Course

Enter your email to begin taking the course. We'll send you a link to begin the mindset course along with emails to help you grow in your writing craft!

You've joined the course! Check your email to watch the first video.

Stop Using Meaningless Character Questionnaires

Knowing your character's favorite ice cream flavor won't help you write engaging protagonists.

 

Our questionnaire is different. Use it to discover your character's core fears, longings, hopes, and needs.

Congratulations! Redirecting you to the character questionnaire in one moment...

Enjoying This Article? Get the Full Series!

 You can download the entire Tricky Subjects for Christian Storytellers series in e-book form for free!

 Learn how to wisely handle subjects like violence, language, and sex as a writer.

Congratulations! Redirecting you to the eBook in one moment...

Worldbuild Smarter, Not Harder

 Some worldbuilding questionnaires force you to answer as many questions as possible about your world.

 

Ours doesn’t. Answer targeted questions that reveal what’s actually important about your world.

Congratulations! Redirecting you to the worldbuilding questionnaire in one moment...

Take Your Style to the Next Level

Take Your Style to the Next Level

The written word matters to God.

 

Does it matter to you?

 

Learn how to develop an eloquent, practical, and personal style by downloading our free e-book.

Congratulations! Redirecting you to the eBook in one moment...

Every Year, Thousands of Writers Give Up

Every Year, Thousands of Writers Give Up

 Don’t be the next.

 

We understand how exhausting writing can be, so download our free e-book and find inspiration to press on!

Congratulations! Redirecting you to the eBook in one moment...

Don't Be That Kind of Christian Writer

Want to impact the world for Christ with your writing—without being preachy or cliched?

 

Learn how to avoid common pitfalls and craft powerful themes by downloading our free worksheet!

Congratulations! Redirecting you to the theme worksheet in one moment...

So You Have Clichés in Your Novel...

Thankfully, we’re here to help!

 

Enter your email below, and we’ll send you a simple process for smashing clichés.

Congratulations! Redirecting you to the cliche worksheet in one moment...

Sign Up for Updates

Enter your email to receive updates on the Engaging Plots Summit, along with emails to help you grow in your writing craft!

You have successfully subscribed for updates!

Does Christian Fiction Need to Be Clean?

Our Tricky Subjects for Christian Storytellers e-book examines how to depict sensitive topics like violence, language, and sex with realism and wisdom. Sign up to download it for free!

Congratulations! Redirecting you to the eBook in one moment...

Poetry Isn't Just for Poets

Poetry Isn't Just for Poets

It can also help novelists write better stories!

Get our Harnessing the Power of Poetry e-book to learn how techniques used by skilled poets can enrich your storytelling.

Congratulations! Redirecting you to the eBook in one moment...

Enjoying This Article? Get the Full Series!

Enjoying This Article? Get the Full Series!

You can download the entire Harnessing the Power of Poetry series in e-book form for free!

Learn what surprising insights and techniques novelists can glean from poets.

Congratulations! Redirecting you to the eBook in one moment...

Uncover the Secret to Relatable Characters

Uncover the Secret to Relatable Characters

Learning how to help readers connect with your story's characters doesn't need to be a mystery.

Get our Evoking Reader Empathy e-book to discover how successful authors build empathy.

Congratulations! Redirecting you to the eBook in one moment...

Stop Using Meaningless Character Questionnaires

Stop Using Meaningless Character Questionnaires

Knowing your character's favorite ice cream flavor won't help you write engaging protagonists.

 

Our questionnaire is different. Use it to discover your character's core fears, longings, hopes, and needs.

 

 

Congratulations! Redirecting you to the character questionnaire in one moment...

Plotting Is Hard

Plotting Is Hard

That’s why we created a worksheet that will help you make sure your story hits all the right plot beats.

 

Sign up below to learn how to ace story structure.

Congratulations! Redirecting you to the plot sheet in one moment...

Learn What the Bible Says about Engaging Plots

Learn What the Bible Says about Engaging Plots

Enter your email to get your guide, along with other resources to help you grow in your writing craft!

You have successfully subscribed for updates!

Pin It on Pinterest