Mariposa Aristeo

Story Embers Public Relations Director & Graphic Designer

Mariposa Aristeo is a self-taught artist and aspiring children’s author who captures the glories of God’s creation on paper. Here at Story Embers, she serves as the public relations director and graphic designer because she desires to encourage other storytellers to craft novels that ignite the imagination and warm the heart.

In between writing and working at SE, she loves illustrating books, such as A Visit to Oaklenbrooke Farm. She hopes to someday publish her own children’s book, a kooky tale that combines humor, heart, and her longtime love of dinosaurs. Her book-eating assistant, Aberdeen the Authorosaurus, supplies her with most of her story ideas and forces her to write by threatening to sit on her. If you want to learn more about Mariposa, Aberdeen, or why she doesn’t listen to him, visit her Instagram.

5 Stylistic Mistakes Most Writers Overlook

5 Stylistic Mistakes Most Writers Overlook

Writers tend to treat the fine points of writing like chemicals in a science lab. Some jumble style and grammar in an intellectual test tube, uncertain which combination will produce the desired effect. Others avoid the subject because they’re worried it might encumber their creativity and make their writing monotonous.

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Bones

Bones

Stomp, rumble, thump, roar! Overhead pterodactyls soar! Jurassic, Triassic, Cretaceous, Iguanodon, Protoceratops, Diplodocus. A flood washed these creatures away, preserving their bones for a future day.

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Beating Hearts

Beating Hearts

Many great women have trod this earth, Their light flickering like a burning hearth, Blazing inspiration into the heart of every American, Like Sacajawea, Earhart, and Harriet Tubman. Others preferred to cast their light on a library, Like Alcott, Austen, and Lucy...

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How the Book of Job Teaches Writers to Create Realistic Christian Characters

How the Book of Job Teaches Writers to Create Realistic Christian Characters

Some Christian writers believe that their characters should sprout wings—or at least tote a halo throughout the book. Others, taking the negative approach, think their characters should be devils who transform into angels (undoubtedly due to a five-minute conversation in which the understanding of spiritual realities is suddenly knocked into them). If our characters resided in heaven, this stance would be acceptable—but they don’t, and it’s about time we pushed them off the cliff into reality.

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