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Isaiah

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  • #151248
    Isaiah
    @allertingthbs

    Oh boy, there’s a lot to go over here. Let’s dive in, shall we?

    If you want a character to lose a lot of blood, not die, and have a decent chance for survival, go for gut/stomach wounds. That area will bleed a lot but not enough for someone to bleed out (usually.) If you want them to be shot several times, you can go with either upper arm or shoulder wounds as well. As long as the left/center pectoral space isn’t hit, there’s a high chance that the heart and other massively vital organs will be missed. You can always use the “if it was a half inch higher, you’d have died” line if you want as well!

    First aid for bleeding wounds in general is pressure. Both for the book and in real life. If you come across someone who’s been shot in the shoulder and it’s non-fatal (they’re still alive) what you’ll want to do is hold a bandage or other cloth REALLY HARD against the wound. The less blood that gets out is the less blood lost, and blood loss leads to a whole lot of bad things. If someone is shot in the stomach, TIGHTLY wrap a bandage around their stomach as well. If the character is shot in the leg, have the defender put lots of pressure on the would and then TIGHTLY wrap the bandage/cloth in place. That’s a fairly standard first-aid training that most people have heard at least a couple times in their lives.

    Now for the last question: can we have a bad guy shot in the head and survive to serve his sentence? Yes! Have him get shot in the eye. If the bullet is coming in from an angle, bits the eye, and exists through the side of the eye socket instead of traveling back to the brain, it’s survivable. Plus then he can get a cool eyepatch and be a pirate villain.

    Adrenalin in fights essentially means that you can ignore *some* pain and get to safety before all the discomfort of injuries hits. For instance, if someone is running for their life and run through say broken glass, they might not notice all the glass in their feet until they stop. The brain decided that survival was more important than feeling all the pain and the adrenalin in the “fight or flight” response makes pain lessen somewhat. Getting shot in the eye is tough to affect with adrenalin, so I’d say probably nothing that could do there. But the good guy who gets shot up might not realize he was shot in the leg until he notices his blood soaked pants.

    "Only a Sith deals in absolutes"
    -Quipmaster 2005

    #150427
    Isaiah
    @allertingthbs

    @miller Stomach/abdomen stabs are tricky. In order to be a fairly quick death, you need a couple things to happen. Massive loss of blood, direct damage to heart/lungs, or damage to the brain. Basically anything that will very quickly prevent oxygen from reaching the brain and other vital organs.

    A wound to the stomach area (what we think of as the stomach) is actually pretty unlikely to insta-kill someone. That area has blood vessels, sure, not no major veins or arteries to sever and cause catastrophic loss of blood. It holds no vital organs, mostly what we think of as guts: digestive stuff. Sure there are kidneys and a liver and stuff like that in the area but they’re closer to the rib cage area than the soft abdomen.

    Stab wounds to the abdominal area will not bleed someone out quickly or damage super vital organs but it WILL cause something super nasty: sepsis. Basically (grossness ahead) stomach acid, undigested food, and fecal matter that are all usually held safely in the digestive track are allowed to get into the spaces between organs when stabbed repeatedly in that area. All that nastiness will basically damage the cells lining other organs and slowly rot someone from the inside (sorry again for grossness).

    So in short, when you see someone get stabbed in a movie in the stomach area like Heath Ledger’s character in The Patriot and they die 5 minutes later, that’s movie magic to drive the plot. If a modern guy/gal gets seriously shanked, they’d get rushed to an operating room and a surgeon removes grossness and repairs intestinal walls. Pretty survivable as long as that nasty stuff isn’t allowed to sit for too long.

    Hope this helped and didn’t gross you out too much!

    "Only a Sith deals in absolutes"
    -Quipmaster 2005

    #150072
    Isaiah
    @allertingthbs

    @erynne You’re welcome, it’s certainly something that not everyone really knows what it’s like. Even for experienced drinkers it can be tough to divide up into understandable steps.

     


    @the-inkspiller
    I agree, talking about difficulties in life can be as strong as the initial step taken to work past said difficulties. I do the same with mental health and depression. Even though it can be uncomfortable for some to talk about, I’m super open to discussing what I went through and what the improvement path has been. Both to remind myself about how far I’ve come and for others to understand that they’re not alone in it and that they too can get help. And yes, yurking in your sleep is suuuuuuuper sketchy in terms of how well it’ll turn out.

    "Only a Sith deals in absolutes"
    -Quipmaster 2005

    #150068
    Isaiah
    @allertingthbs

    @erynne Hey, in answer to the “is there a process” question here. I guess the answer, unfortunately, is “it depends.” Generally speaking, there are a couple levels to inebriation between sober and super drunk.

    1. Warmed Up- After maybe one drink (assuming tolerance is decent) not a lot of difference will be felt, maybe a little more talkative. Depending on what they’re drinking (beer is lighter and liquor is heavier) they could start feeling warm if it’s heavier. Not so much if it’s something lighter.

    2. Buzzed- By the end of drink 2, talk and actions are pretty loosened up and actions get a little less controlled. Imagine a group of adults around the grill at a barbecue around 5:30 PM, laughing at jokes and how they can’t wait for the burgers to be done. Nobody is falling over or knocking things over but they’re pretty clearly not just drinking water.

    3. Drunk- Drink 3-4-5 (tolerance dictates here) coordination is pretty well gone and words are getting slurred. This is the uncle who falls off his chair at the cookout after dinner and keeps knocking over his cup and plate. Face can get red and drinker can be sweating depending on the situation. If they move too fast or suddenly they can get disoriented and even nauseous. Drinkers at this stage can either be funny drunk, angry drunk, sad drunk, etc. Most of what you see in movies around people who are drinkers are in this stage. If they lay down for too long they’ll probably fall asleep.

    4. Blackout- Drink past 4-5 Alcohol has affected them so much that they are not aware of what they’re doing or saying. Probably throwing up or falling over at this stage. Not talking much or moving around much unless they blackout a lot. It usually takes a lot to get to this point but once someone is really really drunk there’s not a whole lot they can do to “sober up” besides sleeping it off. Stumbling around and mumbling is the most you’ll usually get out of someone who’s blacked out (again, unless they do it a lot).

    Heavier set people tend to have sweats or heat flashes more than thinner people I think during drinking, but I could be wrong on that. As for headaches, that’s almost always the next day or even during the night. It happens because the body is super dehydrated and essentially lightly poisoned from the alcohol. IF someone drinks 1:1 alcohol and water, the headache isn’t too bad. But during the night of drinking headaches or body aches aren’t too present. Hope this helped answer your question!

    "Only a Sith deals in absolutes"
    -Quipmaster 2005

    #148921
    Isaiah
    @allertingthbs

    @rose-colored-fancy As a small aside, if you wanted to read a really good series that kinda does what you’re talking about (deals with the aftermath of a government toppled,) Sanderson’s Mistborn trilogy is a great example. His story telling is really on point and he deals with motivations and mental health topics very well. Highly recommend it.

    "Only a Sith deals in absolutes"
    -Quipmaster 2005

    #148277
    Isaiah
    @allertingthbs

    @crazywriter Yep if you’re trying to say something about God, make Him like Christians see him. Pretty straightforward, and like you said, can’t go wrong.

    I’m always open to talk about my faith, whether with a Christian or someone unsaved. Here it just happens to be a pretty specific and deep theological point that isn’t always the easiest to work through. I’m happy to hear what other Christians believe as well, good to know that we don’t become clones in the fight against the Trade Federation (or whatever other sci-fi/fantasy reference you wanna make).

    "Only a Sith deals in absolutes"
    -Quipmaster 2005

    #148275
    Isaiah
    @allertingthbs

    @crazywriter Thanks for writing out your views here, I think I’ll need to sleep on it and think about it a little before getting back into the heavy parts of this discussion. It’s awesome to hear what you have to say and think.

    Just a thought, what do you think of having predestination in your literature work? Do you think that it’s only for a Bible God-centric story or do you not generally use it?

    "Only a Sith deals in absolutes"
    -Quipmaster 2005

    #148273
    Isaiah
    @allertingthbs

    As for the church hopping question.

    The evangelical church was one of the first I can remember, and at the time it seemed just like how church was. Sunday school tended to have candy rewards for sword drills at least (:

    The baptist church I attended for many years until I was about nineteen. I enjoyed it for most of it, the head pastor was very strong in his messages and there was a great youth pastor there who did Sunday evening messages as well. There was a lot of more in-depth sermons by him, things like comparing translations and character studies of some of the Apostles if I remember right. In the last couple years I was feeling the messages to grow a bit repetitious and stale. I also started to recognize and pray on a couple topics like their different beliefs on LGBT+ individuals and how the church leadership handled some difficult situations.

    I started attending the non-denominational church when I moved to a somewhat bigger city for work. The up-beat music and energetic feeling of everything definitely drew me in and the modern feeling of the whole thing. I ended up attending for about 4 years I think, and volunteered for three of them on the audio/video team and assisting in setup and takedown of larger events we did. About three months ago I got to a tough crossroads with their mission.

    Essentially their mission statement is “The most people in the shortest time,” as in trying to reach as many people in as big numbers as possible. The church has seen a lot of growth in the short time I’ve been there, going from two physical locations to four and an online presence. The downside is that almost all material is for new Christians and the amount of more “veteran” deep dives and messages were non-existent. I’ve been visiting a couple of smaller and more traditional places since then, including the Baptist church I grew up in. They just got a new head pastor and he’s great.

    Those are all my experiences at least. I’d love to hear what some of your backgrounds are if you’d like to share anyway.

    "Only a Sith deals in absolutes"
    -Quipmaster 2005

    #148272
    Isaiah
    @allertingthbs

    @crazywriter Thanks for clarifying, certainly didn’t want to misunderstand. I agree that salvation is fully based on God’s grace and His Will. It says in Romans 10,

    – If you declare with your mouth, “Jesus is Lord,” and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved. For it is with your heart that you believe and are justified, and it is with your mouth that you profess your faith and are saved.-

    Isn’t our faith and confession in His ability to save and His sacrifice what makes the decision that we’re saved? He gave His son to be the justification for us and we need only to accept that. I believe that Jesus’ sacrifice in crucifixion is what is predetermined as God sent Him to do so according to His will. He gives each and every one of us the door to walk through, our only participation is to accept our fault and need for salvation. I think the most that someone who’s saved does in the process is basically tapping “accept” on a Venmo transaction, if that transaction happened to be eternal life, joy, and love.

    I’m interested to hear what you think about it 🙂

    "Only a Sith deals in absolutes"
    -Quipmaster 2005

    #148269
    Isaiah
    @allertingthbs

    @emily-waldorf

    I come from an evangelical, then baptist, then non-denomination background (very weird progression but we tried a few different churches growing up and then I moved for work). I personally believe that salvation is granted by God to those who choose to accept Christ as their savior. It’s a bit tough for me to figure how predetermination and free will can both happen and not have one “override” the other. Can you give your thoughts on this? I’d love to discuss it!


    @crazywriter

    I’m sorry, the way you worded things confused me a little. Are you saying that both predetermination and free will take part in salvation but free will is more important? Or were you trying to say that God’s predetermination in any part of it isn’t involved in salvation?

    I do agree that God won’t force someone into a relationship of salvation with Him. We can be stubborn when He wants to work on a character flaw in us but that’s after we trust and have faith in Him.

    "Only a Sith deals in absolutes"
    -Quipmaster 2005

    #148249
    Isaiah
    @allertingthbs

    @crazywriter

    Predestination can be a tricky thing to discuss, even just between different “flavors” of Christianity. I’ll look forward to what you say about it if we get into it as an actual discussion about our beliefs.

    I agree, the Tree in Eden is a great example of (as far as the Bible says) the first and last time humanity had true innocence in a spiritual sense. After that we were all changed by sin and will forever live in sin. Do you think that we have a higher “level” of innocence after being saved and reborn as God’s children? As we live we try to strive toward as close to sinless as we can, do you think that innocence can be measured on a scale (for lack of a better phrase) or is it more of a binary system? You’re either innocent or not? Does that have to translate to story characters or can we imagine more “perfect” examples of humanity in our work? Curious to know your thoughts.

    "Only a Sith deals in absolutes"
    -Quipmaster 2005

    #148244
    Isaiah
    @allertingthbs

    @denali-christianson


    @obrian-of-the-surface-world


    @taylorclogston

     

    Alrighty I’ll be the first to throw down on this Friendly Debate Clearwater Revival (It’s a lazy joke, don’t think too hard about it.)

     

    Violence in Christian Work?

    I think it depends on the genre. Christian-written Adult/sci-fi/fantasy/other mature styles? Let it all in! The Bible has a lot (LOT) of violence and war in it. As long as the focus of the story isn’t shock-gore (think the Saw movies as an example), violence is a very real way to ground the story. Everyone understands pain and suffering; showing what people go through can be an effective way to make a main character sympathetic. If you’re writing a more teen/child style, perhaps dial it back to where you’d think it appropriate for your younger siblings/cousins/friends to consume.

     

    Predestination or Free Will?

    Hoo boy that’s a big question. This will more than likely boil down to what each author believes. Either can certainly be used as story elements. Is there a prophecy about a chosen one to come and defeat a great darkness or evil? That could be considered predestination, and there’s prophecy in the Bible that refers to many different judges/prophets/heroes of Israel (and of course the Messiah). Is the story more about what the main character chooses to do in the bleakest and most demanding of times, and has to make decisions about what to do when faced with impossible choices? That’s a test of free will. I personally tend to enjoy stories where the characters have to struggle through their circumstances and are presented with difficult decisions, but that’s just me 🙂

     

    Finally, can innocence exist without needing to be ignorant?

    I believe so, yes! Innocent mainly means not guilty of a crime, but the meaning referenced here is “pure and without deceit or guile.” Many many stories have a (usually young) character start with CHILDLIKE innocence which usually has a lot of ignorance baked in. That’s completely fine. We get to see their personality and character (haha) grow as they go through their journey. The factor that can decide whether they choose to accept and face the evil or darkness in the world. If they ignore it and choose to say that it doesn’t exist, that would be ignorant innocence.

    A good example of informed innocence would be Frodo in the LOTR movies. Yes, I’m talking about the movies because his character in the books is a bit different in general, especially when talking about childlike innocence. BUT. In the movies he is fully aware of the evil and danger in Middle Earth and what that means for him personally. He chooses to remain innocent and uninfluenced by Sauron’s power (until the last five minutes at the volcano at least). Frodo knows the bad but chooses to remain fully good and faithful that the greater good in the world will prevail.

    I hope that my thoughts can help to kick-start the discourse on these topics, they’re good thought provokers for sure!

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 1 week ago by Isaiah. Reason: Adding in @'s

    "Only a Sith deals in absolutes"
    -Quipmaster 2005

    #146113
    Isaiah
    @allertingthbs

    @kayla13892 Welcome to the group! I’m Isaiah, 24, live in New England. I haven’t finished a writing project either, but hopefully that trend doesn’t continue for too much longer.

    Redwall is great, I think I’ve only missed like two of the books. They’re fantastic for younger audiences to get some “meatier” stories. Taggerung is one of my favorites, maybe right next to Outcast of Redwall.

    I’m not goth, but maybe closer to Alt? Dyed hair, a total of 7 piercings, and a tattoo (yes it’s a cross.) Christians can have individuality and different style choices, certainly doesn’t mean we’re any less of a Christian for it.

     

    "Only a Sith deals in absolutes"
    -Quipmaster 2005

    #146060
    Isaiah
    @allertingthbs

    Also, what ways would work to incorporate a God-figure in a sci-fi?


    @scoutfinch190
    Thanks for the response! I think that a good way to create a God-centered sci-fi story would be to focus on the “science” portion. Sci-fi doesn’t need aliens or world travel. Just some advanced tech and science advancements. If we used the idea “science furthers our understanding of God,” it opens up quite a few possibilities. For instance, an advanced AI system could conclude that the only way the universe was made was by intelligence and design, which is a solid place to start.

    On the flip side, sci-fi can be a fantastic tool to examine your own faith and beliefs. I’ve listened to some really solid books in this genre (Audible is great) and they’ve given me a chance to reflect and ask myself questions about creationism and universal timelines that I may have otherwise not.

     

     

    "Only a Sith deals in absolutes"
    -Quipmaster 2005

    #145995
    Isaiah
    @allertingthbs

    @ashley-tegart Sorry for the late post engagement. You certainly don’t need to finish Mistborn to read any of Sanderson’s other works. Stormlight is much more grand and epic in terms of scale and character than Mistborn, I highly recommend checking out at least The Way of Kings. Plus there are giant swords and giant crabs. What else could you want?

    If you can get your hands on the novelizations of Star Wars Ep. 4-6, they’re actually really good. Give them a try and see what you think.

    "Only a Sith deals in absolutes"
    -Quipmaster 2005

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