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Poets

This is totally about poetry

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 118 total)
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  • #146150
    Rose
    @rose-colored-fancy

    @noah-cochran

    Yeah, I do need to get Scrivener sometime.

    It’s awesome, I couldn’t do without it anymore. Absolutely recommend.

    Oh, then I definitely agree. My mind just works in long, epic proportions I guess, so I write long stuff despite the  ‘I wanna stop and burn this’  issue.

    That is an entire mood. I think that at least once a week, or even more often!

    I have the opposite issue, my main plot ideas need a lot of time but I often didn’t have enough sub-plots to fill up the middle. I do think I’ve gotten better at that though.

    Uh huh, right. You push cats off furniture in your free time don’t you.

    I realize that’s the most bizarre example I could possibly have chosen. I was absently thinking of that time our gremlin cat jumped on the table while I was writing and sat in front of my computer until I gave him attention. Thus, that weird, weird example was born XD

    Off topic, (ha, like we have a topic) do you have a part you usually struggle to write?

    I struggle with beginnings, I tend to make them too slow while trying to set up everything, though I can usually fix that in a second draft. Finales are also a nightmare, I usually just don’t find them that interesting to write since I already know what’s going to happen.

    Without darkness, there is no light. If there was no nighttime, would the stars be as bright?

    #146164
    Noah Cochran
    @noah-cochran

    @rose-colored-fancy

    I have the opposite issue, my main plot ideas need a lot of time but I often didn’t have enough sub-plots to fill up the middle. I do think I’ve gotten better at that though.

    Do you use chapter by chapter outlines or list of chronological events outlines?

    I was absently thinking of that time our gremlin cat jumped on the table while I was writing and sat in front of my computer until I gave him attention.

    Fair. 🙂 Cats have a bad habit of getting right in one’s face without thought for the consequences. I almost dropped a dumbbell on one this morning because the goofy thing was trying to figure out what it was.

    Off topic, (ha, like we have a topic) do you have a part you usually struggle to write?

    I struggle with beginnings, I tend to make them too slow while trying to set up everything, though I can usually fix that in a second draft. Finales are also a nightmare, I usually just don’t find them that interesting to write since I already know what’s going to happen.

    I mean, obviously fight scenes for one thing. 🙃

    For me I think it’s everytime I introduce a major character (so similar to your beginnings one). I’m not sure to what degree I actually struggle with it, but I always feel like my head is going to implode when I try to show that character’s personality, internal conflict/flaw, backstory, and normal life without either keeping to much back or info dumping. The other big thing that ties into this is making sure it’s very, extremely, explicitly clear why  that character decides to become a part of the plot. A character that starts a journey for no visible reason or at least an interesting explanation of why, is something that I’m always worried about doing.

    #146165
    Rose
    @rose-colored-fancy

    @noah-cochran

    Do you use chapter by chapter outlines or list of chronological events outlines?

    Both! I start with the fifteen beats, then I fill in anything I can think of to get from one to the other and then split that up into chapters. And then before I write it I write an outline for the chapter with as much detail as I think of and a rough idea of the dialogue.

    I found that, and listing all the relationships and subplots I want to work with, tends to fill it out a lot more.

    Fair.   Cats have a bad habit of getting right in one’s face without thought for the consequences. I almost dropped a dumbbell on one this morning because the goofy thing was trying to figure out what it was.

    There’s a reason ‘curiosity killed the cat’ is a saying. They have no concept of risk assessment or self preservation.

    That same cat had a habit of jumping on people’s backs while they were bending over. That happened multiple times, but the crowning glory was the time my mom was painting something on a step-ladder and bent down to get something and that extremely large cat decided jumping onto her back was the best possible way to demand attention. Nothing went wrong and we all had some laughs about it XD

    I mean, obviously fight scenes for one thing.

    I don’t know a single person who claims to be good at fight scenes. They’re painful to write XD

    For me I think it’s everytime I introduce a major character (so similar to your beginnings one). I’m not sure to what degree I actually struggle with it, but I always feel like my head is going to implode when I try to show that character’s personality, internal conflict/flaw, backstory, and normal life without either keeping to much back or info dumping. The other big thing that ties into this is making sure it’s very, extremely, explicitly clear why  that character decides to become a part of the plot. A character that starts a journey for no visible reason or at least an interesting explanation of why, is something that I’m always worried about doing.

    Oh, absolutely. That’s a really tough one at the best of times. Introducing characters is hard and I always end up redoing it in the second draft.

    On that note, thinking of external justifications for why characters are where they are. Most of my main characters are either in their teens or close to it and the main external conflict is a war, so it’s extremely hard to think of a reason why anyone would allow these literal children to do anything. 

    I, as the author, frequently think “They’re so freaking young, who allowed them to be here?”

    Unfortunately, aging them up would ruin the rest of the plot so I’m stuck with coming up with weird justifications and hoping nobody notices XD I did not think that through when I started writing and now I’m stuck with it XD

    Without darkness, there is no light. If there was no nighttime, would the stars be as bright?

    #146174
    Noah Cochran
    @noah-cochran

    @rose-colored-fancy

    And then before I write it I write an outline for the chapter with as much detail as I think of and a rough idea of the dialogue.

    Oh wow, nice. That’s a lot more than I do, all I have when I go into a chapter is several bullet points under that chapter.

    On that note, thinking of external justifications for why characters are where they are. Most of my main characters are either in their teens or close to it and the main external conflict is a war, so it’s extremely hard to think of a reason why anyone would allow these literal children to do anything.

    Yeah, I see your point. As long as you have those justifications on paper and they are pretty valid, it’ll be fine. I will point out that in medieval times circumstances almost always caused young people to mature faster and be put out in the world at a young age (I’m talking 14-15), so you can have that mindset transfer to a fantasy world. Granted, I do much prefer to write characters that are 17 or 18+ as they can usually be considered adults and mature in most scenarios.

    Welp, I hope your writing for book three goes well!

    #146177
    Noah Cochran
    @noah-cochran

    That same cat had a habit of jumping on people’s backs while they were bending over. That happened multiple times, but the crowning glory was the time my mom was painting something on a step-ladder and bent down to get something and that extremely large cat decided jumping onto her back was the best possible way to demand attention. Nothing went wrong and we all had some laughs about it

    Oh, and yes, yes, yes! That happens to me all of the time. I bend over to do something, and these cats will literally jump on my back, and then flop down to take a nap up there. Some of the teens even try to crawl up on my head and sit there. It’s hilarious and obnoxious.

    Oh your poor mom. Also: 😂😂😂😂

    #146248
    Rose
    @rose-colored-fancy

    @noah-cochran

    Oh wow, nice. That’s a lot more than I do, all I have when I go into a chapter is several bullet points under that chapter.

    I used to do that too, but I found that even though it takes a bit longer, it makes it much easier to write since I’m very prone to get lost in the middle of a conversation like “Where was I going with this? I know I had a point in here somewhere.”

    Yeah, I see your point. As long as you have those justifications on paper and they are pretty valid, it’ll be fine.

    Coming up with those justification is the hard part XD I really struggle with like the external plot, the actual stuff that happens. The internal and emotinal things are easy but getting the villain to do things that will get the characters there is the hard part.

    I will point out that in medieval times circumstances almost always caused young people to mature faster and be put out in the world at a young age (I’m talking 14-15), so you can have that mindset transfer to a fantasy world. Granted, I do much prefer to write characters that are 17 or 18+ as they can usually be considered adults and mature in most scenarios.

    Yeah, that’s the age my characters are too, and I do use that mindset in-story. I think the youngest main character is sixteen. Besides that, it’s almost reader expectations that these characters will be in charge of a lot of things for their age.

    I think it’s more that I know these characters have three collective brain cells and probably shouldn’t be in charge of a pet rock XD

    I can really see why so many people choose to make their main characters orphans just to get the parents out of the way of adventuring things XD It makes sense from a plot perspective, even though it isn’t any fun for the character.

    Welp, I hope your writing for book three goes well!

    Thanks!

    Oh, and yes, yes, yes! That happens to me all of the time. I bend over to do something, and these cats will literally jump on my back, and then flop down to take a nap up there. Some of the teens even try to crawl up on my head and sit there. It’s hilarious and obnoxious.

    That’s the most adorable thing, even though it’s so unbelievably annoying XD It’s hilarious that all cats seem to have that in common.

    Both of our cats but especially that one, Bots, tend to just sit on whatever you’re working on to get your attention. This frequently happens while gardening. That cat will lay down on top of the plants you’re trying to plant, and then get extremely insulted when you’re less than thrilled. After all, their presence is why you’re there in the first place. I love how all cats seem to think they’re the center of existence itself.

    Without darkness, there is no light. If there was no nighttime, would the stars be as bright?

    #146249
    Noah Cochran
    @noah-cochran

    @rose-colored-fancy

    I can really see why so many people choose to make their main characters orphans just to get the parents out of the way of adventuring things XD It makes sense from a plot perspective, even though it isn’t any fun for the character.

    I agree. However, though I write mostly adult characters (19-20+ in age), who are out of the house or no longer have parents, I also have several characters (19+ in age) who still live and work with their family, and I’m going to make a point to keep several of those parents in the book. I really like the family dynamic of a son or daughter working with their parents, especially in a medieval/fantasy setting.

    This frequently happens while gardening. That cat will lay down on top of the plants you’re trying to plant, and then get extremely insulted when you’re less than thrilled. After all, their presence is why you’re there in the first place. I love how all cats seem to think they’re the center of existence itself.

    It’s glorious how cats are exactly the same everywhere in the world. xD

    #146279
    Rose
    @rose-colored-fancy

    @noah-cochran

    I really like the family dynamic of a son or daughter working with their parents, especially in a medieval/fantasy setting.

    Exactly! It’s a bit harder work to justify everything but it’s so worth it! I love writing family dynamics in general, and I think all of my main characters have some family.

    Sibling dynamics are my absolute favorite thing to write, and parent-child dynamics are up there too. That’s actually what most of my first book is centered around and it was really fun to write!

    It’s glorious how cats are exactly the same everywhere in the world. xD

    Cats are a universal constant of time and space XD Cats have always been cats.

    I remember I read about a medieval manuscript with cat prints all over it. Cats have always walked over whatever people were working on XD

    Lemme see if I can find it…

    It’s an official Croatian letter that was written in 1445.

    I believe I’ve seen Roman roof-tiles with cat prints in the clay as well.

    I think it’s so oddly adorable, people have always have cats that walked over their stuff and that poor scribe must have been so annoyed XD It’s five hundred and seventy-six years ago and we’re complaining about the exact same thing he experienced.

    Without darkness, there is no light. If there was no nighttime, would the stars be as bright?

    #146290
    Noah Cochran
    @noah-cochran

    @rose-colored-fancy

    Sibling dynamics are my absolute favorite thing to write, and parent-child dynamics are up there too. That’s actually what most of my first book is centered around and it was really fun to write!

    I’m getting a zillion character ideas just thinking about it.

    It’s an official Croatian letter that was written in 1445.

    I love that so much. 😂

    #146291
    Rose
    @rose-colored-fancy

    @noah-cochran

    Happy Holidays, I hope you had a great Christmas 🙂

    I’m getting a zillion character ideas just thinking about it.

    Absolutely! I think one of the interesting things about it is that family dynamics function completely differently from most others and that even in the same circumstances, it could work completely differently. Endless possiblities, basically.

    I love that so much.

    I know right? It reminds me of that other piece of paper they found with the doodles on it. Lemme see if I can find it.

    It’s one of the many doodles made by a seven-year-old boy named Onfim who lived in Novgorod (now Russia) around 700 years ago.

    This specific doodle are his parents, and the others are mostly him and his friends, or him battling vague but intimidating scribbly beasts. As you do.

    Most of the pieces have some part of writing practice on them, usually a few letters or a short text, so he was probably doodling in school instead of paying attention.

    I think my favorite thing about it is how much the scribbly drawings look like the stuff little kids always draw. The too many fingers and wonky eyes and rectangle bodies. It looks like something that could have been drawn yesterday.

    I love when I find stuff like that!

    (Also interesting about it, Onfim apparently wasn’t of particularly high class, he was probably a peasant, but his notes to his classmates indicate that young children were taught to read and write even when they weren’t noble. Of course, it may be an exception, one instance doesn’t prove the rule, but it’s still interesting.)

    Without darkness, there is no light. If there was no nighttime, would the stars be as bright?

    #146295
    Noah Cochran
    @noah-cochran

    @rose-colored-fancy

    It’s one of the many doodles made by a seven-year-old boy named Onfim who lived in Novgorod (now Russia) around 700 years ago.

    Nice. Seeing first hand sources of writing and archaeology is always fascinating.

    As you do.

    Elucidation required.  😂

    #146309
    Rose
    @rose-colored-fancy

    @noah-cochran

    Nice. Seeing first hand sources of writing and archaeology is always fascinating.

    Exactly! This was originally written on birch bark, not parchment, so it’s amazing it was preserved that well.

    Elucidation required.

    All little kids draw themselves doing cool things, and in his case that was being a mighty warrior XD

    Without darkness, there is no light. If there was no nighttime, would the stars be as bright?

    #146311
    Noah Cochran
    @noah-cochran

    @rose-colored-fancy

    All little kids draw themselves doing cool things, and in his case that was being a mighty warrior

    Ah, yes, guilty as charged. I used to love my stick-men battles way back in the day.

    #146318
    Rose
    @rose-colored-fancy

    @noah-cochran

    Ah, yes, guilty as charged. I used to love my stick-men battles way back in the day.

    Oh, absolutely. Mine were of the rectangle horse varietyXD

    Without darkness, there is no light. If there was no nighttime, would the stars be as bright?

    #146629
    Rose
    @rose-colored-fancy

    @noah-cochran

    Hey Noah! How are you doing? How are your beta-readers progressing? Do you have most of your feedback in? How is the new series coming along, are your characters cooperating? XD

    (Those were a lot of questions… XD)

    Without darkness, there is no light. If there was no nighttime, would the stars be as bright?

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