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WW2 novella – Beta Readers Wanted

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  • #123712
    Abigail Rebekah
    @abigail-rebekah

    Hey everyone,

    I know I haven’t been as active on here recently, but anyway….I’m looking for beta readers for my first WW2 novella!

    The Nurse Beta Call!
    Calling all WW2 and/or historical fiction fans…

    I present to you…The Nurse… a story of love and faith during WW2.

    ______________________________________________________________
    The soldier saw her coming. And so did a sniper, hidden by the smoky haze that shrouded the field. He adjusted his sights, levelling his gun as the nurse stooped down beside the bloodied form of a man.

    She grabbed his mask and held it over his face. His eyes were full of fear.

    Then the gas was upon them, enveloping the two in a thick cloud.

    The sniper pulled his trigger.
    ______________________________________________________________

    Title: The Nurse

    Type: Novella

    Genre: Historical fiction/romance

    Word Count: 24455

    Content: Graphic war descriptions, war wounds

    What kind of readers I’m looking for: People who enjoy reading historical fiction/WW2 books and don’t mind a bit of romance (clean romance). I’d also love to have people read it who know historical details about WW2 and nurses during that time. If any guys are interested, I’d really appreciate your feedback on the guy characters.

    The feedback I’m looking for: Plot, descriptions, historical accuracy, characters, repetitive words/sentences, if it flows well, dialogue, and anything else you might think of.

    Deadline: I’d like to have people finish beta reading this definitely by 28 February this year (but I’m happy to maybe make some exceptions for small adjustments to the deadline date)

    Story Summary: World War II is sweeping across Europe, stealing the lives of hundreds of courageous men and women who are willing to fight and serve to protect their country and save those they love. Edith is a young nurse serving in France, trying to survive in the midst of danger and death that surrounds her. Denni is a young soldier whose bravery soon causes him to suffer greatly. When the two first meet, they soon discover that they share something in common; the same faith. A deep bond grows between the two, but then, Denni is badly wounded and sent home. As the war progresses, and Edith continues to serve, she soon realises that she must trust God more than ever before. Will she ever see Denni again? Will she even survive this war?

    How to join: Comment below if you want to beta read this and I’ll share the link with you in a comment.


    @naiya-dyani
    I’m tagging you because I really appreciated the super helpful feedback you gave me for my short story – I’d really love to have you beta read my book! No pressure though, and I completely understand if you can’t or don’t want to!

    ~ Laugh. Drink Coffee. Smile. And Write ~

    #123716
    Rusted Knight
    @rusted-knight

    @abigail-rebekah

    Nice. I’m a WWII buff and can offer my services as best I can. As such I must warn you that gas weapons were not used in the European theater. Rumors are persistent the the Japanese used gas in China and the early battles of the Pacific. Gas weapons were covertly moved to standby positions in Europe but only to have them available should the other side use them first. The only “gas” weapon used in the Second World War was white phosphorous.

    Phosphorous was used as a smoke marker but GIs discovered that chunks of the stuff burned similar to napalm. Since flamethrower teams were visible because of the tanks on their backs, snipers could recognize and target them. Phosphorous shells could be used by mortars or cannons and so could be used at far great range, albeit with less accuracy. Also, flamethrowers were more heavily needed in the Pacific and so were rarer in Europe.

    The Devil saw me with my head down and got excited. Then I said Amen

    #123717
    Abigail Rebekah
    @abigail-rebekah

    @rusted-knight

    Thank you! So, does that mean you would like to read my book?

    Ah…that’s interesting. So, in WW2, did the Axis forces ever use gas to blind the soldiers in the trenches?

    In some war films that I’ve watched, it shows gas being released into the trenches, and the soldiers having to put gas masks on. If they didn’t wear the masks, it caused eye problems, temporary blindness ( I think) etc…

    In the context of the few sentences I posted up above, the enemy has released gas into the trenches and the soldiers are quickly putting on their gas masks. Did this ever happen?

    Thanks again for helping!

     

    ~ Laugh. Drink Coffee. Smile. And Write ~

    #123719
    Rusted Knight
    @rusted-knight

    @abigail-rebekah

    Trench warfare more or less ended with the First World War. Gas weapons were developed and deployed as a means of breaking the stalemate. To explain this, One must remember that WWI started almost at the turn of the century. Machinery and technology had made several breakthroughs. The implication of that tech though was made using 19th century tactic. Essentially, we found out how to kill faster but had not figured out how to move men faster. The armies of both sides could not take the losses of attacking each other openly and so more or less began to siege the other in the trenches. Gas was effective because there was a stationary target.

    Such battles began with artillery barrages. Some of those shells would be gas. After that, stormtroopers would begin to clear out the enemies inside the trenches that survived. General infantry would follow with heavy weapons like machine guns and mortars and fortify captured positions.

    The Second World War saw the birth of what we know as combined arms. The advent of the tank permanently changed war. With essentially a mobile pillbox that can go with the infantry, trench warfare was quickly found to be useless. Tanks were big enough and fast enough to roll over and past the trenches. Once past, they could then destroy headquarters, supply dumps and other essential structure. Combined with far better radio equipment, the Germans invented the Blitzkrieg or Lightning War. Now able to communicate with bombers and artillery directly, frontline commanders could order precise, powerful attacks.

    No longer shackled to slogging through enemy lines on a broad scale, the Germans would target specific points and breakthrough. Once a hole was made, the enemies on both sides would be vulnerable to being outflank or entirely surrounded by a much faster army. The Blitzkrieg was quickly adopted by the Americans and other armies. With speed now the focus of armies, the time needed to create the trench systems of the First World War was no longer available. Trenches were replaced by the smaller and more easily made foxhole. With no targets held stationary by complex defenses, gas also left the battlefield as a viable weapon.

    To answer your question, No gas was never used to my knowledge in any battle in the European Theater of Operations.

    The Devil saw me with my head down and got excited. Then I said Amen

    #123752
    Arindown (Gracie)
    @arindown

    @abigail-rebekah

    Hey, I might be interested in reading your book. I’m a girl, and I really don’t know much about the time-period your story is set in, so I’d be focusing on character, plot, and flow.

    What format would I be reading it in?

    Hope I can help!

     

    Not all who wander are lost.

    #123758
    Abigail Rebekah
    @abigail-rebekah

    @rusted-knight

    Thanks very much for all that information! It’s definitely very helpful 🙂

    Here is the link to my book – https://docs.google.com/document/d/1n8A0wqjSuUfcC4cVfN5FT4rOPcQBZ_gm7jQhWPlpyFI/edit?usp=sharing

    Once you request access, I’ll allow it 🙂

    Thanks again!


    @arindown

    Hey!

    Cool! That’s totally fine – I’m looking for a mix of beta readers so that works great for me!

    The format is Google Docs – you can highlight specific sections and comment on them which is pretty helpful.

    Thanks for being interested!

    ~ Laugh. Drink Coffee. Smile. And Write ~

    #123759
    Arindown (Gracie)
    @arindown

    @abigail-rebekah

    Okay, thanks!

    I might also be able to convince my older brother to read it and give some feedback from a guy’s perspective. Would that be helpful?

    Not all who wander are lost.

    #123760
    Abigail Rebekah
    @abigail-rebekah

    @arindown

    You’re welcome! Thank you! I posted the link to the book in the same post btw, if you just want to request access from that 🙂

    That would be great – thank you, but only if he wants to 🙂

    ~ Laugh. Drink Coffee. Smile. And Write ~

    #123852
    Kristianne
    @kristianne-hassman

    @abigail-rebekah

    Your story sounds really interesting and I would love to read it as I’m a huge fan of WWII romance. Unfortunately though, my family will be very busy moving the month of February, so I won’t be able to do it. 🙁 But I think your story sounds wonderful, and I hope you’ll be able to find beta readers for it!

    Courage, dear heart.

    #123884
    Abigail Rebekah
    @abigail-rebekah

    @kristianne-hassman

    Aw thanks 🙂 I appreciate that! If it was like a week past the end of Feb, I’d be fine with that, btw. Totally fine if that doesn’t work for you though. And I completely understand the business of moving house; my family has moved house at least five different times 😅.

    I’ve already got several people who are going to beta read it as I posted it on YWW as well, though, which is helpful 🙂

    Thanks again!

    ~ Laugh. Drink Coffee. Smile. And Write ~

    #123888
    Kristianne
    @kristianne-hassman

    @abigail-rebekah

    I just don’t know what February and the beginning of March will look like, so I don’t want to make any commitments I can’t keep. I would really love to though! But if you’re looking for second round readers later on this year, I would definitely be able to read through it then.

    Thanks for understanding! 😀 That’s great!

    Courage, dear heart.

    #123948
    Abigail Rebekah
    @abigail-rebekah

    @kristianne-hassman

    I totally understand that 🙂 Thanks for wanting to though!

    Thanks – I’ll keep that in mind if I do get a second round of readers. I don’t think I will, but I’ll be sure to tag you if I do!

     

    ~ Laugh. Drink Coffee. Smile. And Write ~

    #123949
    Kristianne
    @kristianne-hassman

    @abigail-rebekah

    Awesome! 🙂

    Courage, dear heart.

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