Ways to glorify God in worldbuilding

Forums Fiction Research and Worldbuilding Ways to glorify God in worldbuilding

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  • #117218
    Eitan
    @eitan

      Month and a half ago I posted a topic about how can I glorify God in mere worldbuilding, if at all. Time passed, I slowly starting my project, and as I think about the issue, I find new ways to glorify God in worldbuilding, Posting here so you (although are primarily writers, not worldbuilders) can use it – and just to share, and maybe get feedback. If you find more ways, please share!

       

      I’m currently working on my world’s astronomy – like, the distance between Earth and the Sun, moon months, and such – and I realized that unless I copy our solar system’s stats (Sun type, distance between the Sun and Earth, moon size, and so on), I have a good chance to create a universe that will collapse, or an Earth that is by no means habitable or Earth-like. Thankfully, I’m not an astrophysicist and will likely not notice any problem. What you don’t know, doesn’t hurt 😉

      I wrote it all in the ”chapter” I’m working on, and added that the conditions for an habitable Earth require an incredible fine tuning we as worldbuilders can’t achieve, so we just have to assume things work. Since I’ll post the project in a (mostly) secular platform… Well, we’ll see 🙂

      (Maybe it will open a discussion that will allow me to present a case for the gospel… I don’t know, and the note is so tiny that it will not be preachy, and will not accomplish the opposite and keep people away from the project).

       

      As Christians, we should explain historical events in two ways – the ”Lower Why” – the technical reasons for an event to occur – and the ”Higher Why” – the spiritual reasons. For example – the Protestant Reformation. One can correctly state the reasons were political (princes were glad to take the Catholic church’s properties, and to stop paying taxes to Rome), and that the match that set everything on fire was the trade in indulgences and Luther’s 95 theses.

      But, as Christians who know God works all the time, we know that the conditions were suitable to a Reformation, and that the ”match” was a Biblical Christianity revival (and not a new heretic cult – theoretically, it was possible), only because God shaped the history this way, to restore the Biblical Christianity.

      We can use the same principle in worldbuilding our imaginary histories. Never say ”they were godly, so they won”. Rather, show how ”in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose” (Romans 8:28).

      The knight did become king because he was a clever general and a wise diplomat, but the reason this knight became king, and not another wise, clever person, is because the knight was godly and God has chosen him for the role (yes, I copy king David’s story 😉 ). The battle was won by the godly, because besides a genius plan, they depended on God, unlike their cunning worldly enemies, and so, God made the weather to be in the godly’s favor.

       

      Now, we can also use worldbuilding to – as subtly and non-preachy as possible, of course – criticize things. For example, there are plenty of legalistic religions that teach salvation through strange practices and customs (Orthodox Judaism, to some extent), good works (Some Christian sects), or clear sins (Islam’s Jihad).

      Without resembling any real world religion too much – maybe copy things here and there, but never to the point where people say, ”Ah, it’s Islam with a Norse setting!” – we can create imaginary false religions, and show in our worldbuilding their damages. Corruption, wars, slavery, spread of diseases due to unhealthy practices, there are enough real world examples to be ”inspired” by. Though worldbuilding them too in-depth isn’t good either.

       

      Those are just a few examples that came to my mind, I’m sure there are plenty more.

       

      Your thoughts?

      You don't need to see the wind itself in order to hear the rustling leaves.

      #117332
      Gracie
      @kimlikesart

        Where I am not building a world, I have been building a culture.

        As Christians, we should explain historical events in two ways – the ”Lower Why” – the technical reasons for an event to occur – and the ”Higher Why” – the spiritual reasons.

        That’s a very good point. Thanks!

        we can create imaginary false religions, and show in our worldbuilding their damages.

        Another good idea/point. (:

        Jominkreesa

        Passion means to be willing to suffer.

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