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Various Outlining and Plotting Methods

Forums Fiction Plotting Various Outlining and Plotting Methods

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
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  • #36442
    Evelyn
    @evelyn

    Good morning fellow emberians! (And in case I don’t see you! Good afternoon, good evening, and good night! 😉 )

    So I was wondering what different kinds of outlining and plotting methods and styles different people here use to plot their novels. Anyone?

    I am using a very basic five point outline for the overall book that I learned of from my favorite author, N.D.Wilson. It goes like this:

    “Title of Book”

    1. Beginning

    2. Middle of Beginning

    3. Middle

    4. Middle of the second half.

    5. End.

    The biggie is that I fill in point one first, and then point five, and then fill in the rest. After that, I do a three point outline for each chapter right before I write it:

    Chapter 1 – Title

    1. Beginning

    2. Middle

    3. End

    Then I write the chapter and look back and see if I change anything and then I write that adjacent on the paper under “Chapter 1 – Changes.” Then I go on, outline chapter two, write chapter two, and note on what I changed or added.

    What do you guys do?

    #36620
    Buddy J.
    @wordsmith

    I don’t put much time into outline. Like no time. So what I do, is I start with a character in mind. I write the begging of the story and work from their. Then again, I mostly write short stories.

    Published author, student in writing, works with HazelGracePress.com

    #36626
    Brink
    @nuetrobolt

    @evelyn, I don’t really make an outline. I really should learn to do outlining more, but I have actually only done it for one story. all my outlines are in my head.

    Your story is yours and no one else's. Each sunset is different, depending where you stand. -A. Peterson

    #36627
    Brink
    @nuetrobolt

    @evelyn, is that how N.D. Wilson writes his books? How did you learn that?

    Your story is yours and no one else's. Each sunset is different, depending where you stand. -A. Peterson

    #36683
    Parker Hankins
    @parker

    @evelyn

    I’m a little embarrassed to say I don’t outline hardly at all. I outline the book with the major points and just write whatever comes out. If it doesn’t make sense, I redo the chapter but I’ve never had to do that yet.

    Living in a world of mystery and dangerous predicaments while working with the AWESOME Meraki's.

    #36685
    Evelyn
    @evelyn

    @nuetrobolt It is. I took a writing course from him: here. Its called N.D. Wilson’s School Of Fantastical Wordcraft for Aspiring Authors and Word Pirates. That’s where I heard of his method and decided to try it out.

     


    @parker
    That’s fine, I don’t think outlining your novel is an essential step, but depending on who you are, it might be helpful. I used to be a “pantser” (which means just write and make it up as you go) but I found that for me, outlining is helpful.

    #36791
    Brink
    @nuetrobolt

    @eveyn, cool! That seems like it would be hard to write the end before the middle.

    Your story is yours and no one else's. Each sunset is different, depending where you stand. -A. Peterson

    #36812
    Evelyn
    @evelyn

    @nuetrobolt Well, I don’t write the final scene before the middle, I just write the last part of the outline before the middle.

    #36964
    Aislinn Mollisong
    @aislinn-mollisong

    I don’t really outline, but I do have a general idea of what kind of direction the story is going before I write it. I fill in the middle as I go along, mostly by playing scenes in my head before I go to sleep.

    Hero with an overactive imagination

    #36980

    @evelyn I find plotting super helpful. I’m much less likely to have plot holes if I plan ahead. (I’m very prone!)  Once I outline I can write like the wind because I don’t have to worry–I’ve already figured out the hard parts.

     

    I primarily use K.M. Weiland’s site for resources on plotting:

    The Great Novel-Writing Checklist (Just in Time for NaNoWriMo!)

    How to Structure Scenes in Your Story (Complete Series)

     

    Story Embers also has a “Three Act Plot Sheet” on their resources page:

    Resource Library

     

    I’ve never seen the type of outlining that N.D. Wilson uses. Can you elaborate a bit more on how it works?

    Spreading God's love until I can see seven billion smiles. 🙂 https://sevenbillionsmiles.home.blog

    #36998
    Evelyn
    @evelyn

    @aislinn-mollisong I seem to have all my brilliant ideas right before I go to sleep… then I can’t fall asleep and end up staying awake for hours, tossing and turning, and thinking about them. In the morning I usually wake and then realize that they weren’t good ideas after all. Go figure. 😛


    @emma-starr
    Thanks for the resources! Yes, I think plotting ahead is very helpful for me personally. It’s so much easier to write a book when you know where it’s going.

    As too N.D. Wilson’s method, I’m not sure what more to say – that’s all there is too it. Sorry if my way of explaining it was confusing!

    Someone who could explain it better I guess is N.D. Wilson himself through his videos on his writing course. Here’s how I received access to them: I listened to a podcast where he said to email him for the password. I did that, and he sent it to me. I found his course very helpful! And one of the videos in the course is focused on his outlining method.

    ( @nuetrobolt  You probably would be interested in that too ^.)

    #37053
    Brink
    @nuetrobolt

    @evelyn, oh, that makes more sense. Yes, I would be interested.

    Your story is yours and no one else's. Each sunset is different, depending where you stand. -A. Peterson

    #37091
    Evelyn
    @evelyn

    @nuetrobolt Good! I think you’ll like it… I really did. 🙂

    #37421
    Brink
    @nuetrobolt

    @evelyn, I have not yet been able to see it (it has to get allowed by my parents).

    Your story is yours and no one else's. Each sunset is different, depending where you stand. -A. Peterson

    #37423
    Buddy J.
    @wordsmith

    @evelyn

    Also, about when the brilliant ideas happen: I think we have really creative ideas, and at that point in time, our brain is understanding a part of it that our brain doesn’t when we wake up.

    Published author, student in writing, works with HazelGracePress.com

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