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Showing Internal Conflict

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  • #142544
    Noah Cochran
    @noah-cochran

    Hey, hey my friends, today, I would like to confess something: One of my beta readers died from over exposure to internal conflict. xD Jk, the reader is fine, but my writer’s conscience is not. 😄

    I’ve ran into a noticeable problem in my writing, and that is the way I’m trying to show my internal conflict. I want what my characters are going through to be clear, but I have so much of it written in introspection, and even a good amount in dialogue that I’m starting to mentally implode.😅

    For instance, one of my characters has a problem with trust and friendship (to put it lightly), and I seem to be writing out those struggles an exorbitant amount in introspection, as well as giving his ghosts and backstory in dialogue.

    Any tips for not overdoing it on the internal conflict? How do y’all show it instead of tell it so plainly?

    Also, what are y’all’s favorite ways to communicate the backstory/ghost that is causing the character’s flaw or misbelief from one character to another? I did it a couple times in dialogue, but I’m worried it’s fake feeling.


    @this-is-not-an-alien


    @joelle-stone


    @rose-colored-fancy


    @calidris


    @taylorclogston


    @r-m-archer

    I welcome anyone and everyone to come help out this poor fellow. 😄

    #142549
    Taylor Clogston
    @taylorclogston

    Unfortunately, the things I planned to recommend are already things you’re trying =P

    What I’ve realized getting alpha feedback for my WIP is even skilled readers and writers can be utterly insane and have no idea what they’re talking about when it comes to alpha and beta reading.

    I’ve had a reader tell me a certain scene needed heavy rework, then come back to it later believing I fixed it, then give me glowing praise for my rework.

    Despite, you know, that I didn’t touch it at all.

    This person happens to be a skilled writer and reader whom I respect.

    Just because your readers think they see issues doesn’t mean those issues exist. Or they might intuit an issue and rationalize the wrong cause.

    I can’t promise my own sanity, but I’d be happy to beta read for you. I think seeing the specific scenes you’re talking about is the only way I’d be able to give decent feedback about the issue anyway.

    If you’d like to take me up on that, you can send me your manuscript and any of your beta questions at itaylorclogston at gmail dot com.

    "...the one with whom he so sought to talk has already interceded for him." -The Master and Margarita

    #142551
    R.M. Archer
    @r-m-archer

    @noah-cochran

    Use the character’s behavior. He may or may not be conscious of his problem, but it will come through in the way he acts toward others. He’ll be wary of people who are nice to him. He’ll try to maintain excessive boundaries. He’ll likely show discomfort when conversations get too deep or when other characters act particularly close with him (e.g. he might shy away from friendly touch like hugs or pats on the back).

    You can also mix up the introspection by showing his thoughts about others as well as himself. Maybe he’s judgmental of or confused by other characters who have close and trusting relationships. Or maybe a part of him wishes he had a friendship like that but he believes it’s not an option (because he’ll never be that naive, because people always fail, because he’s unworthy of it, etc.). You might already be doing this, in which case this paragraph is pretty irrelevant.

    But the easiest way to show someone’s struggle rather than telling it is to use their behavior to reflect their beliefs.

    Fantasy/dystopian/sci-fi author. Mythology nerd. Worldbuilding enthusiast. Singer. Fan of classic literat

    #142553
    Rose
    @rose-colored-fancy

    @noah-cochran

    I actually wrote an entire schpeel and then accidentally deleted it XD But it’s actually exactly what @r-m-archer said, except she said it far better and clearer than I did. Character’s reactions, and how their reactions change, is the best way to show internal conflict.

    It’s especially good if you can have two similar circumstances, one at the beginning and one at the end, and show the difference. Or even have the character themselves think something like “A *period of time* ago I would have– but now–”

    Now, I actually have something to add here:

    Also, what are y’all’s favorite ways to communicate the backstory/ghost that is causing the character’s flaw or misbelief from one character to another? I did it a couple times in dialogue, but I’m worried it’s fake feeling.

    Warning, I’m not good at communicating backstory to the reader (Still working on that XD) But between characters, I have some ideas.

    Dialogue is your best option, but not your only one.

    Make sure the other characters need to know. Sometimes the past is best left in the past and characters don’t need to know everything about each other. I have several characters who don’t know much about each other’s past until the very end of the book. It just isn’t necessary. It won’t change the plot, and it won’t change their relationship.

    If one of your characters is very emotionally intelligent/empathetic, they might guess a large part of the internal conflict without needing to be told. (And will probably start acting on it, and slowly try to get more information out of the character.)

    The most common way to reveal backstory in dialogue is the trusting confession, also known as “Sitting around a campfire, exchanging childhood trauma.” You see this a lot in movies.

    It’s not necessarily a bad thing, but it needs to be executed just right to keep it from being flat or even boring.

    Make sure the reader anticipates the confrontation. Either by having one of the other characters pointedly notice something that indicates the backstory (A keepsake, a mark, a scar, anything of that kind) but don’t give the whole story the first time. Either have your character dismiss it, or they can outright lie, depending on the character.

    Don’t make the backstory bear too much plot if you’re planning to delay it. Nothing is more annoying than a plot that could have been solved if the characters had a good conversation.

    Then, as they come to trust each other more and the other character has a pretty good idea that something is up with this guy, you can have the reveal.

    Now, assuming the character with the backstory is the POV character, you don’t want to focus too much on the backstory. You can even narratively skim over it. The reader already knows this. Don’t repeat it too much.

    Instead, focus on the other character’s reaction to it. Make it interesting, unusual, but above all, in character.

    (And if they aren’t the POV, don’t go too in-depth. The character will probably be apprehensive and skim over it anyway.)

    Now, my personal favorite way, the argument reveal. (I love it too much. The sheer drama of it all.)

    This is especially effective if it’s an argument that’s caused by a POV character messing up because of their disbelief. Naturally, the others will be like “Why did you do that?” and emotions get high.

    In an argument, the character may say things they wouldn’t have if they were being cautious. They’re angry, or defensive, or panicking. They’re going to act impulsively and possibly let cats out of bags.

    Once again, focus on the reaction of the other character, and don’t just let it pass with an “Oh, you have a tragic backstory? All good now, sorry, I didn’t know.”

    It’s better if the backstory radically changes how the others view the POV character. And that doesn’t even need to be in a good light. Perhaps they see the POV character as to blame, or they blame them for not telling them earlier and preventing all this. Let there be consequences!

    Still, it’s kinda hard to explain without actually seeing the scene. I’d love to read one of the scenes if you feel like posting it! Maybe I can give better advice then 🙂

    Hope this helped some!

     

     

    Without darkness, there is no light. If there was no nighttime, would the stars be as bright?

    #142562
    Noah Cochran
    @noah-cochran

    @taylorclogston

    I’ve had a reader tell me a certain scene needed heavy rework, then come back to it later believing I fixed it, then give me glowing praise for my rework.

    Despite, you know, that I didn’t touch it at all.

    That’s hilarious man. 😂

    If you’d like to take me up on that, you can send me your manuscript and any of your beta questions at itaylorclogston at gmail dot com.

    Once I finish my novel, I think I might take you up on that. 🙂


    @rose-colored-fancy
    and @r-m-archer

    Those are great tips y’all, and I will try to show it through behavior and decision making more, but the thing is, I already do that quite a bit. My problem comes in where I show it through their behavior, but then I also feel the need to put it in their introspection. For instance, one character has a problem not caring about the ramifications of her actions, and there is a scene where a man is hurt because of an event she caused. But then I proceed to put her mental conflict over that issue and similar issues in her thoughts. In other words, I always feel like I’m showing it through behavior, and then reinforcing it through introspection.  Thoughts? I already plan on editing out some of the internal conflict in dialogue and introspection, but a lot of it I’m unsure if I should keep or cull. I guess that will be for the beta readers to decide.


    @rose-colored-fancy

    The most common way to reveal backstory in dialogue is the trusting confession, also known as “Sitting around a campfire, exchanging childhood trauma.” You see this a lot in movies.

    That is the exact thing I try to avoid, and is something my favorite booktuber rants against. xD I do agree though that it can be done, but needs to be done carefully. I have a scene where this happens, and I am quite insecure about that scene. xD

    Now, my personal favorite way, the argument reveal. (I love it too much. The sheer drama of it all.) This is especially effective if it’s an argument that’s caused by a POV character messing up because of their disbelief. Naturally, the others will be like “Why did you do that?” and emotions get high. In an argument, the character may say things they wouldn’t have if they were being cautious. They’re angry, or defensive, or panicking. They’re going to act impulsively and possibly let cats out of bags.

    Rose, when I read this, I was like, “Yes! Someone else loves this too!” 😄 This is easily my favorite way as well, and in my opinion infinitely more realistic than the sitting around the campfire type you mentioned. I have a scene where this exact thing happens, and is one of the few that I feel okay about.

    Still, it’s kinda hard to explain without actually seeing the scene. I’d love to read one of the scenes if you feel like posting it! Maybe I can give better advice then

    Maybe I’ll try to get you one of them, but it’ll be crazy confusing without reading the whole book. Plus, I’m gonna cajole you into reading the whole book someday, so I don’t want it to be terribly spoiled. 😏

    #142563
    Joelle Stone
    @joelle-stone

    @noah-cochran,

    Any tips for not overdoing it on the internal conflict? How do y’all show it instead of tell it so plainly?

    What everyone else said. *actually read what everyone else said to understand how to do it myself XD*

    Also, what are y’all’s favorite ways to communicate the backstory/ghost that is causing the character’s flaw or misbelief from one character to another? I did it a couple times in dialogue, but I’m worried it’s fake feeling.

    Don’t info-dump. As a reader, I hate it when the author pauses the story to tell you what a character’s backstory is (though that one part about Artham in the Wingfeather Saga is pretty good), especially when it completely halts the plot instead of enhancing it. So reveal the backstory by dropping hints of it throughout the story, so when you finally write that sentence that ties everything together, the reader’s eyes widen and they have a cartoon-like flashback scene of all those hints they didn’t realize were important. *grinz*

    Other than that, the best help I can give is wishing you the best of luck! *salutes and vanishes*

    "For love is strong as death." -God

    #142572
    Rose
    @rose-colored-fancy

    @noah-cochran

    In other words, I always feel like I’m showing it through behavior, and then reinforcing it through introspection.  Thoughts?

    Honestly, that’s how I do it, and I think that’s how you should do it. Very often, a character’s behavior only gives you a part of the story, and the narration gives you the rest.

    If you only have behavior, it’s very easy for your character to look like a major idiot, while if you have the narration too, you can go “They’re stupid but I can see why.”

    It’s the difference between being mad at the character and being mad at the author. It’ll make your character more likable if you explain what they’re thinking.

    I already plan on editing out some of the internal conflict in dialogue and introspection, but a lot of it I’m unsure if I should keep or cull. I guess that will be for the beta readers to decide.

    I’d say too much is better than too little, for a first draft. If you give it a break and look at it later you’ll be able to see when you’re being redundant. And beta readers are a great help 🙂

    I’d say, leave it for a second, or even a third, draft.

    That is the exact thing I try to avoid, and is something my favorite booktuber rants against. xD I do agree though that it can be done, but needs to be done carefully. I have a scene where this happens, and I am quite insecure about that scene. xD

    Oh, I watch some BookTube too! I especially like Merphy Napier, though I have watched some others. I’ve found it to be a great help in picking out common flaws in books and getting some other opinions from people who read different genres.

    The reveal doesn’t necessarily need to be a big thing. It depends on how big/tragic/traumatic the ghost is. It can also be in a casual conversation without making it dramatic, and that tends to take away the soap-opera-esqueness. (That was a weird word, but you get me.)

    It depends on how many consequences the reveal will have. It’s a setup-payoff thing that makes it seem sappy if there’s this big reveal and all the characters just go “Aight, that’s cool” and everything goes on.

    Rose, when I read this, I was like, “Yes! Someone else loves this too!”   This is easily my favorite way as well, and in my opinion infinitely more realistic than the sitting around the campfire type you mentioned. I have a scene where this exact thing happens, and is one of the few that I feel okay about.

    I know! It’s just so fun to do!

    Another way I like is character A keeping their backstory a secret from B, either out of suspicion or just because it’s too painful to talk about, and then character C (who does know) tells B and they have this “OH, that’s what happened!” moment.

    It tends to highlight how painful the story is for A, and it feels less cliche. I’ve used this a couple times, just because it would be so out of character for the character themselves to talk about it, and I like the effect.

    Maybe I’ll try to get you one of them, but it’ll be crazy confusing without reading the whole book. Plus, I’m gonna cajole you into reading the whole book someday, so I don’t want it to be terribly spoiled.

    Valid point, besides, I’d say this isn’t a first-draft issue. You can fix it later more easily.

    LOL, you’re succeeding XD I can’t make any hard and fast promises, but at this point, I’d like to beta-read it someday 🙂

    Without darkness, there is no light. If there was no nighttime, would the stars be as bright?

    #142582
    Noah Cochran
    @noah-cochran

    Oh, I watch some BookTube too! I especially like Merphy Napier, though I have watched some others. I’ve found it to be a great help in picking out common flaws in books and getting some other opinions from people who read different genres.

    Merphy is easily one of my favorites. 🙂 Her Dear Author series was awesome, I actually took a bunch of notes from it.

    LOL, you’re succeeding XD I can’t make any hard and fast promises, but at this point, I’d like to beta-read it someday

    Oh, you don’t need to beta read, but I’m at least gonna try to convince you to read it once I publish it. 🙂

    Totally random question, but if I type something up in google docs, and then pace it into SE, it gives it a bunch of tags. Do you know how to stop that? Would the paste without format option work?

     

    #142599
    Rose
    @rose-colored-fancy

    @noah-cochran

    Merphy is easily one of my favorites.   Her Dear Author series was awesome, I actually took a bunch of notes from it.

    LOL, so did I! It was very fun and helpful!

    Oh, you don’t need to beta read, but I’m at least gonna try to convince you to read it once I publish it.

    Once published I’ll definitely read it 🙂

    Totally random question, but if I type something up in google docs, and then pace it into SE, it gives it a bunch of tags. Do you know how to stop that? Would the paste without format option work?

    Huh, that’s odd. I don’t generally work in Docs, but I just tried it out and didn’t have any issues. I’m sorry, I don’t think I can help there, I’ve never encountered that problem. 🙁

    Without darkness, there is no light. If there was no nighttime, would the stars be as bright?

    #142628
    Cathy
    @this-is-not-an-alien

    Ooooh I’ve had to do a lot with this one too and idk if I’ll ever get it right!
    I actually have a character with intense trust issues like that and high anxiety etc, and I usually rely on tiny details, mini flashbacks and body-language more but I also use a VERY deep POV so idk, I probably do too much introspection…*shrug*. I think the best way to not sound fake is just to actually feel the emotions your characters are having, I know most of my scenes are (eerily and VERY unintentionally) close to whatever issue I’m working through at the time and the whole book stringing together is basically a self-examination (AND I DON’T LIKE WHAT I SEE…). Soo…be authentic and the rest’ll kinda follow?
    One thing I did learn in draft…three or four, was that I needed to deliberately “set up” scenes for the plot BEFORE the plot was actually revealed, and just set up the character’s personality and problems until I had a good connection before anything happened that required readers to care about my character lol. And so, for example, I ended up “setting up” my character with a way to contrast and demonstrate some of his trauma in a kinda funny way with how he interacts with stray animals as opposed to people and that showed some of his trauma via dialogue like…

    Right out the door, Alessio brushes his fingers against the rim of the broken window of the inn, but his foot nearly knocks into something furry. He glances down as the creature hisses, whipping between his legs so he nearly trips.
    “I’m sorry, I didn’t see you there.” he murmurs, bending over to touch the wulfling. “You’re not still mad at me, are you? Sorry”
    Its bat-ears flick up and down as its feline eyes blink coldly. After a second Alessio touches the remainder of his trinch tucked under his surcoat, staring back at the creature almost guiltily. With an inaudible sigh he slowly lowers onto his heels beside it.
    “Here, that’s all I can give you so shoo.” He grumbles a little, crumbling some of the trinch he saved and holding it out to the wulfling. It sniffs, wandering around his bruised knees, its flappy red-diamonded tail whirls unfamiliarly warm lice-knotted fur against him. He’s not used to touch, or most human contact. Its wet, sticky tongue tickles his hand as it laps the food. Alessio makes a hesitant move to scratch its ears, earning him a forbidding growl. His hand instantly retreats. He sighs.
    “I said I was sorry.” Alessio says, and turns to begin searching the rotting-wood porch closed in the board that might be a rail meant to secure draekons and other steeds hastily. “You’re right you’re right, people tend to say anything because it’s the ‘correct’ thing to say and not because they mean it.”
    If his memory is correct…he dropped his bow somewhere around here. Maybe there’s another broken window, or something. Alessio slips around the back. A noise behind Alessio makes him halt and peek back at the wulfling trailing after him.
    “Peow.” The whipping of its ears make the diamond on its forehead give a trembling motion.
    “N-no,” he says “no, this is not going to work.
    “It’s…it’s not you, it’s me. I’m not ready for a relationship, and I’m a toxic person to be around.” Instead of a back-way Alessio trips near into the stables, for some reason it looks more locked up than most. Although, if a Swarm attacks at least once a year he’d probably make sure every door and building could be closed secure. For a brief second he wonders if he should look in, maybe they found his bow and put it away somewhere, he has yet to ask and he doesn’t want to if he can avoid it. Alessio drops his gaze the fuzzy creature at his heels.
    “I don’t want to break your heart. You’re young, you’re still full of live. So go. Live.”
    It blinks, and licks its paw.
    “Somewhere…else?”

    So that bit kinda shows his major lie (“I’m the villain, unlovable etc”) and some ghosts/flaws (extremely wary of people, unused to touch, avoidant personality all part-due to Trauma), if you listen carefully you get some extra hints to his past but only if you know what to look for and don’t get lost in red herrings LOL assuming I actually pulled that off!! XDD
    Ehhhh kinda long but I WANT A SAMPLE OF YOUR STORY TOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!
    Anyway, he basically just kinda projects a lot of his issues on the wulfling kinda as a joke but also kinda seriously and having the wulfling for him to interact with really sped up the info without it being too introspective (probably) and showed a lot of his personality without breaking up the plot (which I’m actually trying to take real slow like to establish the stakes the connect with the reader in a very immersive way before anything actually happens). My entire plot there is practically build on his past soooo pretty much every page is like that, reestablishing information the readers already know and throwing in just one more thing that better be tantalizing (pls). But I mean every stray throwaway sentence can help.
    Although that wouldn’t be first draft, for the first draft I really wouldn’t try to show not tell the first draft is pretty much tell not show and the all so you know what the story is.
    But to communicate it to other characters…that basically is the conflict that keeps the story in momentum the entire first book XDD. My character is in a situation where he needs to communicate some of his past to get help, but he’s edgy pretty edgy, half the information comes out when he’s having a break down or a panic attack, half his past is surmised by the other characters via his situation, his obvious triggers, all the people who happen to have a bounty on his head, some historical context, a couple eye-witness accounts actually it low-key runs like a murder mystery where everybody’s detective to figure out his past cos it’s putting everybody’s lives in danger and could potentially change the entire course of the war, fate of the world and he doesn’t want to trust the wrong people (or any people) and cause catastrophic ruin by default sooo he thinks it’s a good idea to just try and fix his mess by himself and push away anybody willing to help him cos he doesn’t want to be responsible for anyone else’s death. But as his character develops he tries to communicate some of his ghosts/flaws/intrigue but without telling his backstory and things get messy from there but one of the other characters was actually there for one piece of his trauma and another character knows another bit of his past and if the entire cast got together they could probably sort out his entire backstory on their own if they didn’t end up trying to murder each other in the process and then everybody else’s traumatic backstory kinda weaves into his too sooo, with their character arcs tangled together trying to figure when to trust and who to trust.
    Definitely will probably have some argument reveals sprinkled throughout but then half the characters are also lying to cover up so the readers could probably deduce the story pretty well if they could figure out who’s telling the truth etc etc and man I forgot how much I loved writing this story…
    Aaaaaaaaaand if any of that’s actually helpful…XDD. Also I swear I’m still gonna reply to the Theological Discussion threat I just lost my old notes on Mary and was so mad I didn’t even look at that for a few days and then a bigillion things vomited out of life like a bad case of yack-phoria and my last brain cell ran away and I had to chase it down lol XD. But I’m half-way…a third of the way…maybe a fourth of the way through writing a post…

    Don't let the voices in your head drive you insane;only some of them can drive; most are underage

    #142648
    Noah Cochran
    @noah-cochran

    @this-is-not-an-alien

    Thanks for all the tips Cathy. 🙂

    Draft three or four? How many books have you written? xD

    I really enjoyed reading that piece of your writing, that was unique way to show his internal conflict. Skillfully done. I do have one slight off topic question though, do you prefer present tense over past tense? You were using “says” instead of “said.”

    Ehhhh kinda long but I WANT A SAMPLE OF YOUR STORY TOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!

    Eventually, give me a couple months. 🙂

    I just lost my old notes on Mary and was so mad I didn’t even look at that for a few days and then a bigillion things vomited out of life like a bad case of yack-phoria and my last brain cell ran away and I had to chase it down lol

    Cathy my friend, your ranting just cracks me up.  😂 Keep it up, I love it. xD

    #142695
    Cathy
    @this-is-not-an-alien

    Thanks for all the tips Cathy. Draft three or four? How many books have you written? xD

    No problem! It was great reading through everybody’s suggestions here awesome topic!
    How many books? Assuming you mean finished, hahaaa, none 😣. That’s just an excerpt from a book I’ve been writing since I was thirteen and I’m on the FINAL (hallelujah I WILL MURDER YOU WIP IF IT’S NOT!!!) draft finally! While I’m trying the comic series with my brother and three character castles, an odd moderneque-fantasy fairy-tale mashup that I need to go and strangle to get it outta the way until I’m ready and probably a couple evil deadline murder-clowns. But yay final drafts!!!! 😀

    I really enjoyed reading that piece of your writing, that was unique way to show his internal conflict. Skillfully done. I do have one slight off topic question though, do you prefer present tense over past tense? You were using “says” instead of “said.”

    Thanks! <3
    Yes, I really enjoy using present tense. At least for that one it just really fit in smoothly, there were so many flashbacks in the first couple drafts that I was like “hey, if I keep this up I might as well just change tense for the flashbacks cos I just read something that did that and that’s neat” (was the books ONLY redeeming quality and I never finished it and I don’t think I even remember its title anymore) and that was awkward and first but then it just really clicked for me and now it comes a little more naturally than past tense narratives, I even experimented a little with future tense once and that was REALLY fun but not like for this WIP.
    So, I guess to sum, present tense just really smoothed off my narrative for this particular story and I love it and I’m always experimenting with my styles but I think I do have a preference for present tense over past tense when I’m writing cos I really really get into my scenes and want to roll with the feel that I’m actually there while it’s playing out idk why.
    Any writers’ voice quirks you really like?

    Eventually, give me a couple months.

    Lol, I’ll hold ya to it! (:

    Cathy my friend, your ranting just cracks me up.  Keep it up, I love it. xD

    Thank you!! (*idk why that makes me so happy somebody likes my ranting 😂that’s so much better than being called pretty*). I was following the advise of the wise old memes (because of course they’re always right and everything! 😜) “if you can’t say something nice, make it funny” oh or better yet! “If you can’t impress them with your intelligent baffle them with your insanity!”

    Don't let the voices in your head drive you insane;only some of them can drive; most are underage

    #142836
    Noah Cochran
    @noah-cochran

    @this-is-not-an-alien

    How long have you been writing Cathy?

    Any writers’ voice quirks you really like?

    I’m a fairly boring guy when it comes to special tastes. xD Why don’t you recommend me some good books with unique voices. 🙂

    Thank you!! (*idk why that makes me so happy somebody likes my ranting 😂that’s so much better than being called pretty*). I was following the advise of the wise old memes (because of course they’re always right and everything! 😜) “if you can’t say something nice, make it funny” oh or better yet! “If you can’t impress them with your intelligent baffle them with your insanity!”

    There is no way I’m the only one who likes it. 😄

    “If you can’t impress them with your intelligent baffle them with your insanity!”

    I am so using that quote, I love it! 😆

    #142886
    Cathy
    @this-is-not-an-alien

    How long have you been writing Cathy?

    *tilts head to think* I kinda started when I was nine but so on and off I’d only count it because the ideas never stopped building in my subconscious from that. I really started like a day or two before I turned thirteen cos I decided by the time I turned fourteen I’d have a first draft and I was a couple days past my deadline but ended up ok. Then I spent the next year researching self-publishing and marketing while touching up and partial redrafting and by fifteen I was at “total rehauling” stage and I got my two cousins to beta-read as I wrote but this year (now seventeen) I’m revising everything rehauled and have a very firm grip on the key elements/themes of the story and I write two chapters a month to be submitted on the 7th and 21th to my beta readers (at chapter twelve or so now). It took so long in part because it’s my first book and still working out writing system but also I had to pull an extensive amount of research into accurately portraying complex trauma, suicidal behavior, demonic infestation (yes there’s a way to research that Old Testament and exorcist docs) especially linked to New Age, nihilism, and subjective reality/morality philosophies, and accurately portraying lgbtq+ characters as well-rounded characters. In retrospect what the heck was I thinking thirteen-year-old me?! *remembers I literally had no outline at all and idk how or when those themes crept in XD*
    So counting when I was nine that’s eight years, and not counting that about four years going on five 🙂 Hbu?

    I’m a fairly boring guy when it comes to special tastes. xD Why don’t you recommend me some good books with unique voices.

    Lol. Well I just finished the False Prince and LOVED it and he had such a lively voice and I love 1st Person POVs that keep secrets XD! I liked the Inkheart Trilogy’s descriptions, they had very vivid imagery revolving around books, fire, darkness, loneliness, betrayal and choosing. It was really good how she’d describe this villain who came out of book with “skin as pale as parchment paper” etc; every description was related to a particular set of imagery that had a particular set of themes/concepts attached to it. Hell Spawn’s a Catholic horror I just finished reading (yes while reading False Prince) and it had a very dynamic 1st Person voice, lol, while it’s more or less research-accurate it’s kinda more sensational than religious but what did I expect from a horror? (: Still fun read! The Percy Jackson series was another fun 1st Person, Dracula was an interesting narrative that acted like a series of diaries, journals, memos and recordings tagged together some during the events, some before and some after and it managed to be pretty intense and engaging even with that (although I still haven’t finished it yet 🙂 and it was leaning hard on the less part of more or less accurate to Catholic beliefs lol)

    There is no way I’m the only one who likes it. “If you can’t impress them with your intelligent baffle them with your insanity!” I am so using that quote, I love it!

    Thanks😂! LOL IKR!!! That’s such a wise meme!!

    Don't let the voices in your head drive you insane;only some of them can drive; most are underage

    #142903
    Noah Cochran
    @noah-cochran

    @this-is-not-an-alien

    Then I spent the next year researching self-publishing and marketing

    Okay, you’ve piqued my attention. 🙂 What has your research shown? Do you happen to have a step by step process for step publishing type up somewhere that you could share with me? Or is it all in your head? xD If you ever have the time, I would love to hear all the tips on marketing a self-published book you could give me. I’m planning to do my own in depth dive this winter after I finish my first draft of my novel, but I never pass up wells of information such as yourself if I can help it. So if you ever have the time, I’d welcome anything and everything you could give me. 🙂

    So to get it straight, how many times do you revise/second draft your books?

    I’ve been writing for a grand total of 4 months. xD I literally knew almost nothing about writing until June last summer, and in June and July I did my research on writing and storycraft, and started practice writing sessions. I officially started writing, by starting my outline and first draft of my current WIP at the end of July.

    The False Prince is a great book, what of my favorite YA books I’ve ever read. 🙂

     

     

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