Self-publishing

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  • #33869
    Jenna Terese
    @jenwriter17

    As some of you may know, I plan on self-publishing a novella this summer. If any of you have any advice about self-publishing, I’d greatly appreciate you sharing! Do self-published authors have to store books in their home and send them out when people order online? What site is best to publish on (I was looking at Lulu and Ingramspark)?


    @snapper
    @dekreel @gabriellepollack @overcomer @mariposa @daeus @morreafirebird @supermonkey42 @skredder

    "If you want to change the world, pick up your pen and write." -Martin Luther
    www.jennaterese.com

    #33879
    K.M. Small
    @morreafirebird

    @jenwriter17 oooh, congrats! That’s really exciting πŸ˜€

    I haven’t self-published before, but I have researched it pretty extensively, so I know a bit about it. Usually the books are print on demand, depending on what site you’re using. I know Lulu does that, though I haven’t heard of Ingramspark before. I believe the best site, both in ease of use and in royalties for you, is CreateSpace. It’s done through Amazon, so your book will be on Amazon for customers to buy. I believe both @daeus-lamb and @hope-ann have used it.

    As for as general advice, making sure your book has a good cover, traditional/clean formatting, and no typos is pretty important for making a professional impression. Marketing is also something to think on, as no one will know about your book unless you tell them. I believe the best way to market a self-published book is to gather a launch team, or a group of people who will review your book and post about on their blogs/social media.

    Anyways, those are my thoughts. Daeus and Hope will probably have more info for you πŸ™‚

    ~ Khylie
    "Beauty will save the world." - Dostoevsky

    #33887
    Caleb E. King
    @caleb-e-king

    Hey, @jenwriter17 ! Congrats on getting ready to self-publish! As Audrey said, I would think CreateSpace would be the best to start off with. It’s free to use, they have options to get someone to actually make your cover for you (That’s pretty expensive though I just made my own) and it is published on amazon. You don’t have to store it in your house (though you could sell books yourself, people could just buy it off amazon) because it is printed on demand, which means when amazon gets an order, they print that copy of the book. So it’s pretty cool. Again I second Audrey on having a professional cover, good, clean format, and all that. I myself am still figuring out marketing so this is all I have for you. Hope it helps! πŸ™‚

    Young Writer. Crazy Reader. Happy Cartoonist. Author of www.calebeking.com
    Proud Meerkat!

    #33899
    R.M. Archer
    @r-m-archer

    I’m thirding (totally a word) CreateSpace. That’s what I’ve used (for various short stories I printed just for me as well as a collection of short stories that I published), and publishing through CreateSpace is a pretty simple process.

    You will want a professional cover (not necessarily professionally-made, but one that looks professional/appealing/whatever), and you’ll want an editor of some kind (whether you hire an editor, get your mom who’s great at proofreading to look over it, get some beta readers to do it for free, whatever. Get some fresh eyes on it, and preferably more than one set.) Definitely keep in mind that there are different types of editors, and I’d suggest getting both a developmental editor and a proofreader/line-editor (again, whether you hire someone to do it or get someone to do it for free). Make sure you get someone who will be honest but not necessarily brutal (this is mainly advice for if you’re getting someone to do it for free, because a professional should fit that bill period. If they don’t they’re probably not the best choice.), and prepare yourself for them likely ripping your book apart even in a non-brutal way. It’s making your book better, not attacking you or your writing.

    I don’t have a lot of advice as far as marketing goes (I stink at marketing, myself, and I didn’t focus on it with my short story collection (intentionally) so I don’t have a lot of experience with it), so hopefully someone else can help out with that aspect of it.

    Hopefully that helps! πŸ™‚

    Fantasy/dystopian/sci-fi author. Mythology nerd. ENFP. Singer.

    #33905
    Jenna Terese
    @jenwriter17

    @moreeafirebird @r-m-archer @caleb-e-king Thank you all so much! This is helping me get together a plan of what I’m going to do. πŸ™‚

    "If you want to change the world, pick up your pen and write." -Martin Luther
    www.jennaterese.com

    #33906
    Gabrielle Pollack
    @gabriellepollack

    @jenwriter17 I fear I don’t know enough about self-publishing to be helpful, but it looks like you’ve got some answers already. πŸ™‚

    #33964
    Daeus Lamb
    @daeus-lamb

    @jenwriter17 Createspace is probably your best bet for a print on demand book. Personally, I want to move toward bulk ordering copies and selling them via fulfillment by Amazon, but that’s anΒ advanced strategy that I’d only recommend if you have a large following already.

    Ingramspark is a great company, just as good as Createspace, though it will cost you a little bit to set your book up, whereas Createspace is totally free.

    I agree — definitely go for a professional cover. I’ve used a guy who charges either $67 or $87 (I can’t remember which) for very professional print and ebook covers. I can direct you to him if you’re interested.

    You can do your own professional formatting using Scrivner, though it takes some effort to learn (I think Scrivner 3 is supposed to be easier to use, though I haven’t upgraded yet). If you have a Mac, you can also do a very professional formatting job using the software Vellum — I think they charge $30 for formatting, or something like that.

    Marketing is a VAST subject. If you ever want to publish a book that lots of people will read, I really suggest you dive in and start learning. If you start with the right resources, you’ll be able to learn fairly quickly. The key is to learn from the best, plugin to a community with others trying to learn the same things, think outside the box, and keep on trying with a positive attitude. Here are some basics, just to get you oriented.

    • You want to find people who read the type of books you write and earn the right to contact them. Earning the right to contact them means they willingly submit to hearing from you on a semi-regular basis. Examples are that you write amazing blog posts and people start to follow you or you offer a free book to anyone who signs up for your email list so people subscribe. There are many ways to stay in contact with your followers, but your email list is the most important.
    • Both to get new followers and to market your book when it launches, you’ll want to do some outreach. Outreach is working with other people who have an audience in the hopes that you can both benefit each other. For instance, Bob has a podcast on teens doing big things. Bob needs people to interview or his podcast dies. I step in and talk about how I did a big book launch and Bob’s audience hears about it. Bob’s podcast stays alive and I sell some books.
    • When you launch your book, you’ll want to do two things (actually, more, but these are the essentials). You’ll want to collect a street team. A street team is a collection of your most dedicated followers who want to see your book succeed. When your book comes out, they have assigned tasks that will help spread the word about your book to the masses. For instance, they can review your book and share about it on their blogs and social media. The other thing you’ll want to do for your launch is build hype. Don’t announce out of the blue that you’re book is out. You start selling your book before it is out by sharing things like what inspired you to write it, art from the book, sneak peeks at chapters, etc. During the launch, you can also build hype by giving away prizes, hosting a live launch party, etc. Hype get’s people emotionally prepared to pull out the credit card and buy your book.

    That was a very brief overview of marketing. If you want to really study it (it seriously is fascinating and fun), I’d suggest that most articles don’t go very deep into the subject. If you want to learn how to market yourself well, books and courses on the subject are probably your better option.

    πŸ˜€
    πŸ‘•πŸ‘
    πŸ‘– 🐒🐒🐒🐒🐒

    #33965
    Hope Ann
    @hope-ann

    *shows up late to the conversation* Basically what everyone else has said. Daeus covered about everything, I think. πŸ˜‰

    Victory in the march. Hope in the destination.

    #33973
    Mariposa Aristeo
    @mariposa

    @jenwriter17 I’ve never self-published anything myself, so I don’t really have any advice other than what’s already been said. However, you might want to check out Successful Self-Publishing by Joanna Penn (it offers a lot of great advice on the subject). πŸ™‚

    I think dinosaurs are cooler than dragons. πŸ¦–

    #33997
    Jenna Terese
    @jenwriter17

    @daeus-lamb your info helped me a lot! πŸ™‚ That guy that did covers for you, does he have a website that I could look at?


    @mariposa
    I think I’ve heard of her, I’ll check it out. thank you πŸ˜‰

    "If you want to change the world, pick up your pen and write." -Martin Luther
    www.jennaterese.com

    #34005
    Daeus Lamb
    @daeus-lamb

    @jenwriter17 Yep.Β http://bookcovermall.com/custom-design

    πŸ˜€
    πŸ‘•πŸ‘
    πŸ‘– 🐒🐒🐒🐒🐒

    #34066
    Jenna Terese
    @jenwriter17

    @daeus-lamb Great, thank you!

    "If you want to change the world, pick up your pen and write." -Martin Luther
    www.jennaterese.com

    #38839
    Jenna Terese
    @jenwriter17

    Hi all! I had a couple blogging related questions and instead of creating a whole new topic for it, I just thought I’d ask them right here. πŸ™‚

    1) How do you get people to do guest posts on your blog? Just by knowing other bloggers? 2) how do you get asked to do a guest post for someone else? I assume just be patient and wait until I’m asked πŸ˜‰ 3) does anyone use Mailchimp for their website newsletters etc.? does that work well?

    Thank you!


    @hope-ann
    @gabriellepollack @jane-maree @j-a-penrose @mariposa @daeus-lamb @briannastorm @r-m-archer @caleb-e-king @morreafirebird @everyone

    "If you want to change the world, pick up your pen and write." -Martin Luther
    www.jennaterese.com

    #38840
    Daeus Lamb
    @daeus-lamb

    @jenwriter17 I wouldn’t wait for guest posting opportunities. I would look for them. Figure out what type of blogs you want to guest post on, go find some blogs like that, see if they have any guest posts and if they do look for anything on the blog about how to submit guest posts.

    MailChimp is great.

    πŸ˜€
    πŸ‘•πŸ‘
    πŸ‘– 🐒🐒🐒🐒🐒

    #38841
    J.A.Penrose
    @j-a-penrose

    @jenwriter17 Hahahah, I know nothing on this topic, despite having a blog. Sorry. But I can say that most of it really is just knowing people and probably being asked. *shrugs* You can also just be doing the asking.

    Writer | Freelance editor
    Inspiration

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