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Rndm brainstorming post to help each other when we got nothing. Yep.

Forums Fiction Plotting Rndm brainstorming post to help each other when we got nothing. Yep.

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  • #144079
    Emma Walker
    @emma-walker

    @erynne and then Edward the prince I can’t remember who did his faceclaim. He’s gonna find her and a backstory is that he walks in a room and asks her a question and doesn’t know she can’t hear him and he gets mad because he thinks she is ignoring him. So through the entire winter she’s frightened of him and avoids him and then in the spring they play hide and seek and she gets lost and he’s the one that finds her and she just clings to him and almost pushes away her siblings. *nods*

    • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 1 day ago by Emma Walker.

    "If your goal is purity in heart, be prepared to be thought very odd." -Elisabeth Elliott

    #144097
    Emma Walker
    @emma-walker

    @erynne Ive already asked three people what little adventures the kids can have and they all said things like hide and seek and I’m just like …. Those aren’t adventures, ya know?

    "If your goal is purity in heart, be prepared to be thought very odd." -Elisabeth Elliott

    #144100
    Rose
    @rose-colored-fancy

    @noah-cochran

    *I walk over and start a congenial conversation with Emma

    *Joelle skids to a halt besides us, we raise a brow in surprise

    *Erynne skids to a halt beside Joelle and immediately starts berating her for such rudeness

    *Rose, unable to stop her face pace, rams straight into Joelle and Erynne and the three of them fall into Emma and me

    *Everyone lies in a large pile gives each other exasperated writer looks

    Yeah, no, this is exactly what happened XD

    So this is interesting (see my comment to Joelle), I think this can work, but I’ve been torn on which way I should do it, protags or antags first. What I do know is that it is of vital importance that the protags have very good external and internal reasons for caring about the atag and their plan. My problem with starting with the protags is that I’m worried that I’ll have to majorly revise them to work with my atag.

    Something that may work for you (it’s worked for me so far) is to set up your antagonist’s motivations while you design your protags, and then you design their plans while you come up with the character arc.

    I wouldn’t say I don’t like it, but good night is it hard. xD I have grown to believe that though the protags are what make a story shine, the main antagonist and their plan is what ties all the protagonists and events together–without it, there would just be a bunch of characters aimlessly walking about. That’s my thought process anyway.

    You’re totally right and it ups the stakes even more to get it right.

    What I usually end up doing is I first decide what kind of adventure I want the protags to have (a quest, a heist, and a revenge mission are going to require different plotttings from the antagonist) and then I try to somehow put some motivation for the antagonist there and as soon as I have some kind of loose outline I usually give up and leave it for revisions.

    My clever-plan-inator takes a long time to load. Also the reason I don’t like battles XD To the point that I plotted my last two books so I can avoid any large-scale battle on-screen. I don’t like reading them, I don’t like writing them XD

    Without darkness, there is no light. If there was no nighttime, would the stars be as bright?

    #144106
    Noah Cochran
    @noah-cochran

    @emma-walker

    Yeesh, I’m at a loss. All the adventures and schemes I think of wouldn’t fit a 9 year old. xD

    Whatever you choose, I would recommend trying to build a very mysterious atmosphere. Maybe think along of the lines of some powerful, fantastical/sci-fi, mysterious object that the villain wants and the kids have? That’s all I’ve got. xD

    #144107
    Noah Cochran
    @noah-cochran

    @rose-colored-fancy

    What I usually end up doing is I first decide what kind of adventure I want the protags to have (a quest, a heist, and a revenge mission are going to require different plotttings from the antagonist) and then I try to somehow put some motivation for the antagonist there and as soon as I have some kind of loose outline I usually give up and leave it for revisions.

    That makes sense, and sounds like it might work just as well.

    To the point that I plotted my last two books so I can avoid any large-scale battle on-screen. I don’t like reading them, I don’t like writing them

    I haven’t written any yet, but I agree, they are hard. I like to read them if they are written with a huge focus on the characters taking part in the battle, and not the battle itself.

    #144108
    Emma Walker
    @emma-walker

    @noah-cochran a deaf nine year old at that.
    Yea, maybe. Thanks.

    "If your goal is purity in heart, be prepared to be thought very odd." -Elisabeth Elliott

    #144161
    Sarah
    @ajstoryteller

    @emma-walker

    How big or long are these adventures? Are the adventures more episodic like mysteries or a bit more grand like Narnia or Wingfeather Saga?

     


    @noah-cochran

    Totally agree with you on battles. They’re a pain to write, and even small fight scenes for me give me trouble. Battlescenes that aren’t character centric or don’t effect the plot or development in any way are incredibly boring to me, and even draining. I recently read a story that had a battle every other chapter, and it focused more on the ‘cool factor’ of the battle and never gave me any real reason to care about the people involved.

    Speaking of which, does anyone have any tips for writing fight scenes in general?

    #144182
    Emma Walker
    @emma-walker

    @ajstoryteller kinda episodic like Anne of green gables.

    "If your goal is purity in heart, be prepared to be thought very odd." -Elisabeth Elliott

    #144185
    Noah Cochran
    @noah-cochran

    @ajstoryteller

    Speaking of which, does anyone have any tips for writing fight scenes in general?

    That is a fantastic question Sarah, let me forward it to my knowledgeable friend Rose @rose-colored-fancy so she can nod sagely and enlighten us. 😉 (she does historical European martial arts and knows a ton about medieval combat, so I would consider her an erudite on the subject)

    I wrote several fight scenes in the medieval novel I just finished, and though I don’t think they’re unrealistic, I do have my doubts on how entertaining and coherent they are. xD

    #144188
    Rose
    @rose-colored-fancy

    @noah-cochran

    That is a fantastic question Sarah, let me forward it to my knowledgeable friend Rose rose-colored-fancy so she can nod sagely and enlighten us.   (she does historical European martial arts and knows a ton about medieval combat, so I would consider her an erudite on the subject)
    You vastly overestimate me XD But I’ll do my best!


    @ajstoryteller

    Okay, as Noah mentioned, my credentials are that I’ve been doing HEMA for the past two months (my main weapon is a longsword), I’m writing a Medieval action-adventure fantasy with a lot of fight scenes, and I enjoy researching and have done so extensively.

    My first instinct is to say that I write it, rewrite it, and hope for the best XD

    I’ll try to be more helpful than that XD

    Character focus. As you mentioned before, nothing is quite as boring as fight scenes for their own sake. Make sure it’s important to your characters and shows some part of them or it’s absolutely plot required.
    Terrain. Check what kind of area they’re fighting on. Rocks? Going to be hard to move and easy to trip. A house with furniture? Improvised weapons, but not much moving space. Think about your enviornment and try to use it.
    Weapons. Decide which weapons your characters are using, then research the heck out of them. I highly suggest finding videos of people sparring with the same weapons. (Not as hard as you’d think!) It helps you find the rythym and can even teach you some interesting moves to use.
    Compare opponents. Who is stronger? Who has trained longer? Who has the high ground? Who has more stamina? Is one of them wounded or using an unfamiliar weapon?
    Stakes! This one is obvious but worth mentioning. Mention the stakes.
    Now, those are very basic tips, so let me get more into the actual writing of it.

    Don’t do a move-by-move thing. So don’t: He raised his sword diagonally, she attacked him from above, he stepped forward and deflected her cut.

    Now, you can use this, but sparingly. When your character does something cool or improvises in an interesting way or fails spectacularly, it’s worth using.

    Otherwise, show your character plotting or changing plans. Show how they think.

    Oh, I just remembered a fantastic video essay and explanation by Hello Future Me! It covers anything I could tell you and more. I highly recommend checking it out!

    On writing: Fight Scenes

    and

    On Writing: How to master fight scenes

    They’re extremely detailed and packed with useful information, covering everything from big picture to sentence structure. Of course, they’re about fight scenes, so I advise you to use discretion, but I don’t remember anything particularly gory.

    I’m going to stop here because there’s nothing I can add to those videos XD I hope this helps!

    If you do want more technical details about longsword fighting, I’m always up for talking about it! (I know almost nothing but I’m happy to share the three things I know XD)

    Dangit, it won’t post! I’ll try posting the links seperately!

    Without darkness, there is no light. If there was no nighttime, would the stars be as bright?

    #144190
    Rose
    @rose-colored-fancy

    On Writing: Fight scenes

     

    Without darkness, there is no light. If there was no nighttime, would the stars be as bright?

    #144191
    Rose
    @rose-colored-fancy

    On Writing: How to master fight scenes

    Without darkness, there is no light. If there was no nighttime, would the stars be as bright?

    #144245
    Sarah
    @ajstoryteller

    @rose-colored-fancy

    Thank you! I’m sure these will be helpful.

    #144247
    Erynne
    @erynne

    Ok I gotta question. What’s some creative ways to show mourning over a death?

    I’ve never been one to show my pain to people, so I’m a very, um, weird I guess, mourner. I don’t cry or anything, I didn’t even cry at my own father’s funeral. So yeah, I don’t really know how to write it. Any tips?

    (btw I swear I’m not a heartless human being, I just have my own way of dealing with loss and pain I guess)

    Be weird. Be random. Be who you are. Because you ever know who would love the person you hide.

    #144249
    Emma Walker
    @emma-walker

    Oh that’s sad, I’m sorry @erynne

    Some characters just “build a wall” to keep their emotions in.

    Disney princesses are known to throw themselves on the nearest bench or bed and cry. XD

    I cry.

    Some people try to pretend it’s not true.

    some people are slow to comprehend it.

    *Tries to think of more*

    "If your goal is purity in heart, be prepared to be thought very odd." -Elisabeth Elliott

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