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Release Schedules – Help!

Forums Fiction General Writing Discussions Release Schedules – Help!

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  • #93207
    Edmund Lloyd Fletcher
    @edmund-lloyd-fletcher

    Okay, so I’ve published one novel, but it was really a shoot-from-the-hip thing getting it out there.  In fact, I’m not sure what I really learned by that, other than it’s not a good way to do it.

    For my forthcoming books I need a plan.  I need something I can put on a calendar and say, okay, 6 weeks to launch, so I need to do X, Y, and Z.

    I tried looking this up online and all I wound up with was a vague, slushy, jumble of ideas.  Not a plan I could really follow.  (And for those reading this who haven’t published yet, I’m sure this is even more overwhelming still!)

    My question is, what kind of release schedule do you guys follow?  Do you have a written plan you could share with the rest of us?

    Any help appreciated!

    Homeschooling father of 10, writing Christian action/adventure novels from my home high in the Rockies.

    #93213
    Cassandra Hamm
    @cassandraia

    I’ve never tried to self-publish anything, so I honestly have no idea. I’m not sure who could help with this. @daeus-lamb?

    I crush readers' souls like grapes.

    #93225
    Daeus Lamb
    @daeus-lamb

    @edmund-lloyd-fletcher Are you talking about marketing?

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    #93344
    Edmund Lloyd Fletcher
    @edmund-lloyd-fletcher

    @daeus-lamb I’m sure that plays into it a lot, but I just need a release plan in general.

    Allow this long for beta reads, then about this long for resulting changes, this long for content edit, this long to get isbn, start a blog tour this many weeks in advance, send out ARC’s this far ahead of the release date, how far ahead to announce on social media, oh, and don’t forget to follow up with people, … and 3,000 other things I’m probably overlooking.

    Right now it’s all just a conglomeration of thoughts floating around in my head and when I try to put them into any kind of actionable plan, I just get overwhelmed to the point of freezing up. :}

    Homeschooling father of 10, writing Christian action/adventure novels from my home high in the Rockies.

    #93441
    Edmund Lloyd Fletcher
    @edmund-lloyd-fletcher

    Case in point, I was just researching this some more today (working on my own schedule) and came across an article on the launch party.  “Make sure you have enough copies on hand.”

    Well, YEAH!

    Problem is, I would’ve needed to order these books, banners, swag, and/or any other promo material, maybe a week or two before that… yet I could only place that book order after I’ve received and verified the proof copy.

    So this thing that I literally hadn’t even thought of an hour ago has now wedged itself into the schedule and impacted the timing of everything.  This begs the question, what other whammies might I be missing!??

    Surely others have done this before.  I’d sure like to learn from your experiences!

    Homeschooling father of 10, writing Christian action/adventure novels from my home high in the Rockies.

    #93564
    Daeus Lamb
    @daeus-lamb

    @edmund-lloyd-fletcher Okay, I’d give beta readers about a week per 5,000 words, give or take. Now, if you want to go through several revisions (advised), you can speed things up by sending your novel out in parts. Once the first group of beta readers finishes part one, you give them part two, edit part one, and give part one to the second group of beta readers. And so on.

    I’d research which editor(s) you want to go with early and then contact them a month or two before you think you’ll actually need them because they’ll probably need to finish other projects before they can get to yours.

    You should reach out to a cover designer a month+ in advance so you have time to make needed revisions.

    I’d allocate a week for your proof copy.

    ARCs send out date?… depends on the length of your book. However long it would take the average (dedicated) reader to get through your book. You can speed it up just a little if necessary.

    Your marketing schedule depends on what you want to do. (Book launch blueprint is a good book on book launches, btw.) Anyway, you’ll want to be driving most of your traffic during the first 5 days of the launch with some small marketing nudges throughout the rest of the year.

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