Publishing?

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 25 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #44031
    Katthewriter
    @katthewriter

    Hello,

    I have always heard that before you’re even ready for publishing, to look into it, like study on your own publishing, or with a company, and which you would be more interested in. Or practice writing things that you would send in to the companies to see if they would publish your books.

    But how does one do that? I couldn’t really find stuff on publishing on here, unless i looked all the wrong places. Is there any good websites, or books or anything that talks about traditional, and normal publishing? Or how one would even start the process of getting ready to publish, and what to do, after they have finished there book?

    I know this is a really big question, with probably alot of answers.. but even if you could just help with a little bit of it, I would be very grateful.

    Thanks,

    ~Kat

    @jane-maree @or anyone else who would know…

    #44040
    Inkling-for-Christ
    @inkling-for-christ

    @katthewriter, I do not know much about publishing. However, my parents have warned me about there being possible scams. I am going to tag a bunch of peeps who may know better than I. Actually I would Like to hear thoughts about publishing too since I am looking to publish

    @kate
    @briannastorm
    @josiah
    @gabriellepollack
    @jenwriter17
    @morreafirebird @daeus-lamb
    @joyofemberley

    INFJ, Child of God, wannabe author, writer, dreamer, fan of DR. Who, Star Wars, NCIS-LA

    #44043
    Jane Maree
    @jane-maree

    @katthewriter Whooo okay buckle down. I’m going to try be as summarizing as I can, but this post is still probably going to be reaally long. 😛

     

    When thinking about publishing, there are two main methods of publishing your book. 1) traditional publishing. 2) self publishing.

    Traditional publishing: you pitch your novel to an actual publishing house/company. They’ll look at the basic summary of your novel and decide if they think it will be worth the money of publishing. If they think it will be, they’ll accept it, and from there it’s editing and cover designing and after a lot of all of that, your book will be published. The publisher will take charge of getting the book into bookstores and other online sites.

    Self publishing: you use a platform like Amazon or CreateSpace to print paperback copies of your book. You’re in charge of everything; the cover designing, getting a professional editor, marketing your book so people will actually buy it, etc. However, you won’t have your book in bookstores, or many online stores (with some exceptions. I have seen some self published books in bookstores before).

     

    Most publishers offer about 12% of royalties (aka money earnings from sales) to the author. While this might seem like a small amount, it’s actually quite fair considering how much money they’ve put into getting your book out into the world.

    With self publishing, you get a much larger percentage of the royalties. BUT you also have to do all the cover design, marketing, printing, etc. out of your own pocket.

    That’s most of the rough details of what each route is. This video (and youtube channel) is really helpful if you want to hear it from a published author.

     

    Once you know what the options are, it’s a matter of working out which would be better for you. Do you want to self publish, or traditionally publish? Which would work best for your situation?

     

    How to get reading to be published

    Once you’ve worked out what method of publication you want to go by, you have to work out what you want to publish. You want to make sure that the story is unique and interesting, that people will want to buy it, and that you’re confident you won’t regret publishing it later.

    If you want to go traditional: research publishing houses and agents. Make a list of ones that accept and publish fiction in your genre. Make sure that they’re accepting new applications. Read books that they’ve published to see if your books could fit in with their other books.

    If you want to self publish: check out other self published books. What made them succeed or fail? What platform were they published off (amazon, createspace, etc.)?

    Before you send in an application to a publisher, and certainly before you self publish, you want to make sure that your book is as good as it can ever be.

    1: write and rewrite and edit
    2: have a few readers go through the draft and give comments and suggestions (they’ll see the problems you missed)
    3: more rewriting and editing!
    4: enlist beta readers to get more help on any other problems.
    5: repeat. 😉
    6: hire a professional editor to go through your manuscript. Yes, this will cost money, but it’s also definitely worth it in the end. This also might be quite a thorough edit, as a professional editor will probably pick up more problems than your other readers.
    7: apply those edits and fix any other problems that you can see.

    After that the self publishing and traditional split apart again. Self pub should go on to do another professional edit to smooth out the small details like formatting and typos, etc, in a proofread. Traditional will have to dive into pitching to publishers/agents.

    Disclaimer: I haven’t gotten to the pitching stage yet, so half of this advice is just from things I’ve heard, not actually done myself. 😉

     

    Other things you can practice now:

    • Research how to write a full book synopsis. Quite a lot of publishers will ask for a synopsis (not a back cover blurb, but a detailed outline of the entire book) when you apply, so it’s good to have practice for how to write one of those. This is a post I’ve found helpful: 6 Steps for Writing a Book Synopsis
    • Build a platform. Whether you’re traditionally publishing or self publishing, you’ll need a platform. This is a blog or a social media following. It’s getting your name out there so that people know you and therefore will know that your book exists and hopefully buy a copy too. 😛 I wrote a blog post about this a while ago which you can check out too: Author Platform — What Is It, and Can I Do It?
    • Learn how to market your books. You won’t be starting to market them until you’re coming up toward an actual release date, but that doesn’t mean you can’t research and learn how to do it. A lot of writers are introverts and it’s really hard to market yourself, because it feels like boasting or showing off. So you can never have too much practice! Nadine Brandes did a super helpful blog series on the topic of marketing, which I highly recommend everyone check out: Book Marketing Series

     

    And….that is a massive monster of a post so I’m going to stop there. 😯 Not sure if that totally answered your question, so if you have any more questions feel free to fire away and I’ll do my best to answer them! 😀

    Writing Heroes ♦ Writing Hope // janemareeauthor.com.au

    #44044
    Jane Maree
    @jane-maree

    Oh yes, @inkling-for-christ has a very good point, I forgot about that.

    If the publisher asks you to pay them, DON’T DO IT. They are a scam. Never ever ever pay someone to publish your book.

    Writing Heroes ♦ Writing Hope // janemareeauthor.com.au

    #44045
    Jane Maree
    @jane-maree

    @Faith_Blum @Hope-Ann

    Tagging you guys because you’ve both self published and have better advice for that route than I do. 😉

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 9 months ago by Jane Maree.

    Writing Heroes ♦ Writing Hope // janemareeauthor.com.au

    #44051
    Faith Blum
    @faith_blum

    I will try to reply tomorrow. If I don’t, tag me again, please. Although, Jane had a very good answer. Even though I only skimmed it.

    ISTJ ~ Independently published author ~ wife ~ mother of two in heaven ~ www.faithblum.com

    #44054
    Josiah DeGraaf
    @josiah

    I’m not going to even try to add onto @Jane-Maree’s response since she nailed it.

    I will couple, though, on what @inkling-for-christ said about publishing scams being out there. Certain vanity sites like to prey on amateur authors (“Christian Faith Publishing” is one of these sites that I’ve unfortunately seen a lot on different Christian communities I’ve been on the last couple years). “Writer Beware” is a great site to use to research publishing houses if something feels a bit too good to be true about them.

    Lit fanatic. Eclectic reader. Theology nerd. Writing fantasy at https://josiahdegraaf.com

    #44064
    Faith Blum
    @faith_blum

    For self-publishing, I highly recommend Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing (or KDP for short), Draft2Digital to get onto other eBook distributors, and either KDP or Createspace for paperbacks. I haven’t tried using Ingramspark yet, but I hear they are also excellent for paperbacks. You do have to pay an uploading fee and buy your on ISBN numbers, though. But the perk with going through Ingramspark is that it sounds like it is easier to get into bookstores. If you have any questions on self-publishing, please feel free to ask me. I’ve been doing it for almost five years now, so I can probably answer pretty much any question you have.

    ISTJ ~ Independently published author ~ wife ~ mother of two in heaven ~ www.faithblum.com

    #44086
    K.M. Small
    @morreafirebird

    @katthewriter I think Jane Maree gave the most thorough explanation there is 😀

    Go Teen Writers also has some great articles on publishing, and I’d highly recommend their book. 🙂

    ~ Khylie
    "Beauty will save the world." - Dostoevsky

    #44097
    Inkling-for-Christ
    @inkling-for-christ

    @jane-maree, @josiah thank you. You both answered some questions that I have been asking myself and I keep forgetting to ask my SE community. @josiah, THANK YOU 1,000 TIMES. In February I submitted my work to Christian Faith Publishing (CFP) and got accepted within a week. However, when I learned about the cost (3.5 thousand dollars) I was scared because I am paying my way through community college (about 2 thousand a semester), and knew I could not afford both. After praying and praying God told me to wait. I relayed that to CFP and they said they would come back to me in September. Sadly, I do not have the best of relationship with my parents and I did not tell them about any of this. It was my sister who told them and they said it was a scam. I didn’t believe them and was determined to do it claiming “they know nothing about this”. Apparently, this proves I am the one who knows nothing. I HAVE NOT PAID A PENNY TO THEM AND THANKS TO YOU I WILL NOT PAY THEM ANYTHING. So now I am on the hunt for a new safe place. Any recommendations?

    INFJ, Child of God, wannabe author, writer, dreamer, fan of DR. Who, Star Wars, NCIS-LA

    #44106
    Jenna Terese
    @jenwriter17

    Well…@jane-maree pretty much covered it. 😀

    "If you want to change the world, pick up your pen and write." -Martin Luther
    www.jennaterese.com

    #44108
    Jane Maree
    @jane-maree

    @inkling-for-christ

    Look in your bookshelves! See what books are similar to yours and look up their publishers.

    Writing Heroes ♦ Writing Hope // janemareeauthor.com.au

    #44111
    Inkling-for-Christ
    @inkling-for-christ

    @jane-maree,

    does it help that the only books on my shelf are LOTR, Wingfeather, Narnia, and Little House on the Prarie?

    INFJ, Child of God, wannabe author, writer, dreamer, fan of DR. Who, Star Wars, NCIS-LA

    #44113
    Jane Maree
    @jane-maree

    @inkling-for-christ Hmm….well you can look up those publishing houses. Some other ones you can check out:

    – Enclave/Gilead Publishing
    – Cedar Fort Publishing

    Plus this handy dandy super cool list of a heap of Christian agents (not necessarily fiction, but all Christian) which I found on Zondervan’s site.

    Writing Heroes ♦ Writing Hope // janemareeauthor.com.au

    #44114
    Katthewriter
    @katthewriter

    @inkling-for-christ

    Thank you, and i was talking to a christian author, Dandi Daley Mackall (i read her Winnie The Horse Gentler series) and she gave me a list of christian publishing companies, and lots of these were ones i recognized as ones that a few other books that i owned were done by. So those, i’m sure arn’t fake.

     

     

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 25 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!

Pin It on Pinterest