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Nightjay's Plot

Forums Fiction Plotting Nightjay's Plot

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  • #44069
    Andrew Schmidt
    @andrew

    Okay, what do think about this plot? I am planning to have it be a series (just decided) but anyway, I’d like anyone’s thoughts on it. The Theme is about stubbornness if that helps, the focusing question is about when is it alright to be stubborn, and the answer is that it’s best to be stubborn when you (actually) hold the right answers. Okay, if you think I should change that theme, I’d like your thoughts on it too, but I’m mainly here for the plot.

    Beginning: Nightjay and Susan, with the help of some friends, seek out to rescue Gareth and a bunch of others on a mission.

    Inciting Event: Starting a grand journey to Algrenock Castle where Master Wreath stands, they meet evil beasts and beings of all kinds as they venture throughout the globe.

    First Plot Point: Seeking to make peace with the monsters of the Forgotten Forest so they can defeat the evil, Nightjay continues his journey – meeting more friends each time and stubbornly ignoring advice. But can all of those friends be trusted?

    Mid Plot Point: When Yardan comes up with a disastrous plan stop Nightjay and deliver them into the hands of the links, he causes a great disturbance. But Yardan does not get a reward, and instead misfortune.

    Third Plot Point: As Susan and a handful of his friends has fallen into the Indigo’s hands because of Nightjay’s un-careful ways, he is forced to rescue them, while Gareth and bunch others are still held prisoners as Algrenock Castle.

    Climax: Nightjay goes back to the Forgotten Forest for help, but instead is captured in Monster Pelton’s ruthless ways. He has to fight his way out, but his stubborn ways have led him to his doom. But when he attempts an escape, he is tested in a way never before.

    Resolution: When the monsters have tested him – and see his true colors – they have the results they wish for out of Nightjay and are now willing to help, despite the fact that Pelton was only there for the profit. But how will they defeat Master Wreath of the blackshards, General Indigo of the links, and seek out all the lost friends scattered across the lost lands of the vallucks? Their journey still continues.


    @josiah
    @deaus-lamb @mariposa

    "Muhahaha!"- Unknown Villain

    #44070
    Parker Hankins
    @parker

    I think this sounds epic!!! The tag didn’t work for @daeus-lamb so I’m tagging him.

    Living in a world of mystery and dangerous predicaments while working with the AWESOME Meraki's.

    #44073
    Andrew Schmidt
    @andrew

    @parker, thanks you! 🙂

    "Muhahaha!"- Unknown Villain

    #44074
    Parker Hankins
    @parker

    My pleasure!

    Living in a world of mystery and dangerous predicaments while working with the AWESOME Meraki's.

    #44075
    Daeus Lamb
    @daeus-lamb

    @andrew Sounds pretty good. Now, obviously, there are some things I don’t know like who Yarden is or what test Nightjay faces in the climax. I assume it’s all connected in your mind though.

    One thought is that if you’ve got a message that you can be stubborn when you hold the right answers, it would be important to have a supporting theme asking the question: “how do you know when you have the right answers?”

     

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    #44078
    Andrew Schmidt
    @andrew

    @daeus-lamb, thanks. That was helpful. 🙂

    Some of these characters and stuff aren’t mentioned in the plot very much, but they’re in the story a lot.

    Oh, and thanks for the thoughts about the theme too.

    "Muhahaha!"- Unknown Villain

    #44197
    Josiah DeGraaf
    @josiah

    @andrew I second @daeus-lamb’s thoughts on the theme. Had the same question myself. 🙂

    Two other questions:

    Generally speaking, the midpoint should signal a large shift in the narrative where the protagonist moves from reacting to acting and also gains a moment of clarity about the real conflict going on. Here, it just seems like another event; I’d recommend making the midpoint more central (at least than it seems from the summary).

    Is this a negative or positive character arc for the protagonist? Since he succeeds at the end, it seems better to fit with a positive arc, but if he was still making the wrong choices toward the end of the story (and thus getting himself captured due to stubbornness), it seems like too abrupt a shift for him to make the right choice toward the end of the story. What does the protagonist’s internal journey look like?

    Lit fanatic. Eclectic reader. Theology nerd. Writing fantasy at https://josiahdegraaf.com

    #44221
    Andrew Schmidt
    @andrew

    @josiah, okay. The protagonist has a positive arc. I’ll make sure to do something with that mid point too.

    This is the protagonist’s internal journey: As Nightjay goes on his journey – with a couple deceitful beings that happen to cause a lot of the conflict in the story, not to mention the many other enemies- he stubbornly ignores advice, thinking everything is alright as he marches into danger. But when all is taken from him, and he is left tangled in his own doom, he then experiences the great challenge awaiting him where he finally learns his lesson.

    Hope I made that good enough.

    But anyway, I’m planning to have it be a series of three books (which they may be novellas, and maybe not novels) so, I had this question: Should I split the theme up into all three books, have a different theme for each book, or have one big theme for the entire series with little themes to go along with each book as well? I hadn’t written very much series before, so thoughts on this would be nice.

    "Muhahaha!"- Unknown Villain

    #44312
    Josiah DeGraaf
    @josiah

    @andrew Either approach to theme could go well–I personally prefer the last approach myself as a storyteller, but I’ve seen skilled storytellers use any of those three well. 🙂

    One concern I have with the protagonist learning his lesson only at the end is that, depending on how you develop it, it could seem too abrupt/convenient of a change to make. Change in the real world is hard and it takes a lot of time and struggle to live virtuously (see: Romans 7). Generally speaking, you want a character arc to be gradual throughout the entire story–with the protagonist beginning to learn his lesson around the midpoint (even if he doesn’t fully embrace it until the end). If he’s still regularly messing up at the 85-90% mark, it could feel like a “cheap” repentance of sorts, so I’d be cautious about putting his repentance off that long.

    Lit fanatic. Eclectic reader. Theology nerd. Writing fantasy at https://josiahdegraaf.com

    #44493
    Brink
    @nuetrobolt

    @andrew, sounds really good!

     

    Your story is yours and no one else's. Each sunset is different, depending where you stand. -A. Peterson

    #45159
    Andrew Schmidt
    @andrew

    @josiah, thanks. I’ll do that. Probably put some foreshadowing about the ‘test’ too.


    @nuetrobolt
    , thanks. 🙂

    "Muhahaha!"- Unknown Villain

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