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Minimal

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  • #135814
    TanyasCreative
    @tanyacreative

    If you could shake off what a Plotter and Pansters are just to get the bare minimal (in this particular case, favoring the Panster) what would YOU consider those traits/habits/preferences to be?

    May God bless you!

    #135866
    Arindown (Gracie)
    @arindown

    @tanyacreative

    I’m a Panster, so I can’t really speak for Plotters.😄  But, the difference I see is that Plotters like to have everything mapped out before they start. They like to see that this story is going in a good direction and will be successful. Pansters, on the other hand, just go by their gut and know that “It’ll turn out good somehow.”

    Not all those who wander are lost.

    #135907
    Ashley Tegart
    @ashley-tegart

    @tanyacreative

    I’m a very extensive plotter and have never been able to finish a project with any other method. This is what my process typically looks like:

    1. Brainstorm general premise
    2. Write a 1-3 page synopsis
    3. Write a chapter-by-chapter outline
    4. Revise synopsis and outline as needed
    5. Write a super short rough draft with key scenes
    6. Revise rough draft to get manuscript to appropriate length, building in subplots, description, etc.

    Plotting is really a process to help my brain keep track of plot threads, character arcs, what I need to foreshadow, etc so I can better enjoy the drafting process.

    #135910
    Rose
    @rose-colored-fancy

    @tanyacreative

    I have tried both plotting and pantsing, but plotting works better for me.

    These are some key differences I’ve noticed:

    Plotters get stuck and frustrated when they don’t know where they’re going while Pantsers tend to stray from their outline and make up a lot of things on the fly.

    Plotters get more excited if they know where they’re going while Pantsers lose interest in a project if they know exactly what’s going to happen.

    Pantsers dislike the planning stage, while plotters enjoy outlining. (Warning, not universal! I’m a plotter, and I’m always impatient to get past the outline stage.)

    I hope this was what you were looking for!

    Without darkness, there is no light. If there was no nighttime, would the stars be as bright?

    #135913
    Noah Cochran
    @noah-cochran

    @tanyacreative

    Plotters like to know where they’re going, Pansters like the sense of the total unknown.

    However, there is a large spectrum of area between Panster and Plotter.  For instance, most pansters have some sort of small outline or synopsis to know what the book is about and who the characters are. As for plotters, the amount of which the outline is extremely varied.

    We have people like Abbie Emmons (a booktuber, if you haven’t of her, you should check her out). She outlines her entire book, then outlines individual scenes in chapters, to the point where she pretty much wrote a very tiny, concise first draft. And we have people like Brandon Sanderson, who outlines his plot and world, but outlines very little of his characters and doesn’t use a chapter by chapter outline (as far as I know anyway).

    I am much closer to the extreme plotter on the spectrum than the extreme pantser, but even with my chapter by chapter breakdown I don’t know many of the smaller events that I’m going to put in a chapter till I write it.


    @ashley-tegart

    I have never thought or heard of the concept of  writing a very short first draft and then filling it in with descriptions and smaller events. That is quite intriguing.

     

    #136002
    TanyasCreative
    @tanyacreative

    Wow this has been extremely helpful in clarifying the Plotter & Panster and how I feel and now know I am going to be. It’s been so very hard trying to fit the square block into the circle hole that I was silly trying to be a Plotter when I am a Panster! The more I plot and outline the more I run out of steam and desire. I sure would like to be the type of person and writer to have it all down as it’s endlessly frustrating to have to make sure Susie’s Aunt on her mother’s side is named the right name through out the book(s).

    With that said, @ashley-tegart I give wild applauds, chocolate and coffee to the extent you’re capable of going to for your writing and rather admire it. Feel free to send some of that in my direction! If it works for you then, by all means, keep going with it with your writing self!! I’ve never heard of or thought of doing the revisions you do in such a seemingly short time span.


    @rose-colored-fancy
    It’s helped as it further cemented which I am and which I am not. I too am impatient at plotting and outlining, and it’s really come down to trying to so hard to force the story (and characters) fit into each scene and outline. That’s where I made the biggest mistake! All the years, I’ve never really gone into any sort of writing time with a set goal or plan and was SOO much more content in just letting the character speak.


    @noah-cochran
      Yes, yes! Small ‘spectrum’ is exactly point on what I am after – just how small of spectrum I’m wondering I can get away with. Abbie Emmons I stumbled onto through YouTube and have several of her videos in a playlist to get to watching and I looked up Brandon Sanderson just now and did the same with his videos. Needless to say I have A LOT of videos the playlist/folder to go through and take notes. I just hope and pray that all the research of writing and things doesn’t make me too scared to write badly. I keep praying for Jesus’ help to focus and not get afraid and the permission to write badly.

    Thank you! Thank you for allowing yourselves to be used by the Most High to support and guide me along! I value and appreciate your time and effort to comment and not work on your books. <3

    Blessings!

    May God bless you!

    #136004
    Noah Cochran
    @noah-cochran

    @tanyacreative

    Don’t worry about it too much. 🙂 I just started writing around two months ago, and the first thing I did was watch a bunch of youtube channels on writing (including Emmons, Sanderson, Merphy Napier’s “Dear Authors” series, and a smattering of other channels), and read a few books on writing (namely K. M. Weiland’s).  It wasn’t too hard, and I took a bunch of notes in google documents so now I can access them at anytime. I learned a ton about writing in the last two months, and a couple of story embers members are now helping to smooth at my more jagged corners. 🙂

    #136080
    Rose
    @rose-colored-fancy

    @tanyacreative

    Glad I could help!

    Abbie Emmons I stumbled onto through YouTube and have several of her videos in a playlist to get to watching and I looked up Brandon Sanderson just now and did the same with his videos

    Totally recommend both of those! (And Alexa Dunne also has some cool content!) What I loved about Sanderson’s classes was that he wasn’t just repeating “Show don’t tell, and you have to do stuff my way or it’s wrong” He had some very interesting insights that gave me a ton of ‘aha’ moments.

    And as Noah mentioned, the “Dear Authors” series is also cool!

    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by Rose.

    Without darkness, there is no light. If there was no nighttime, would the stars be as bright?

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