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Just a question

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  • #69868
    Thomas (CrØss_Bl₳de)
    @thewirelessblade

    I’m probably the type of guy you wouldn’t expect to try and draw, but say I wanted to. Where would a guy like me start?

    *Forum Signature here*

    #69881
    Taylor Clogston
    @taylorclogston

    I’m gonna hijack since I’d also like to figure out how to begin:

    I understand rationally I need to be thinking of whatever I’m looking at as 2D and just drawing what I see, but I have a really hard time doing that even with one eye closed.

    I keep wanting to, like, draw in 3D, which is obviously impossible =P Any advice on breaking through this?

    "...the one with whom he so sought to talk has already interceded for him." -The Master and Margarita

    #69885
    The Fledgling Artist
    @the-fledgling-artist

    @thewirelessblade Hey!

    This is kind of a hard question to answer, but the best thing to do is just start. Learning how to draw is a skill that takes time to develop. To learn to draw well, you’ll have to be okay with making some less then excellent artwork. Practicing means making a lot of artwork that wont look good. But if you can make a habit of practicing, you will improve. 🙂

    Now say someone started drawing everyday. That’s great! That’s all they need to improve. However, there are some things they could do to make their practice more efficient, and therefore, improve faster.  The biggest thing is to use references. Real life references are better, but referencing from photos works well too. There is also value in doing something called ‘gesture drawing’. Which is, in the most basic terms, drawing really fast. The idea is to capture the gesture, or flow of an object in as few lines as possible. It’s also important that you don’t get caught in a loop of drawing the same(ish) things over and over. This is super easy for most artists (myself included.) and it hinders artistic growth A LOT. Try to keep drawing things you’re not comfortable with yet.

    And to close this ramble off, I would suggest getting either A. A sketch book, or B. A folder of some sort to store your papers in that you’ve drawn on. Many people are tempted to throw away their “bad art” but with hindsight that’s a terrible idea. Training yourself to throw away the ‘bad art’ will cause even more frustration, and nurture negative feelings. And then keeping it is an amazing way to track your progress. And those old pieces may even inspire future creations! The things I’ve said may not be true of everyone, but are definitely the case for me!

    Lemme try to sum everything up, since I’ve probably confused you.

    1. Draw a lot!
    2. Accept that getting good will take time, and a lot of ‘failures’.
    3. Keep pushing yourself out of your comfort zone, as comfort will hinder growth.
    4. Your bad art is precious! Don’t throw it away, and try to be patient with yourself as you’re learning.

    (If you wish I could tag some of the other lovely artists on the forums? There are actually quite a few!)

    "Though I'm not yet who I will be, I'm no longer who I was."

    #69960
    Ariel Ashira
    @ashira

    @thewirelessblade The Fledgling Artist took the words out of my mouth.  She is right on!

    "No matter how much it hurts, how dark it gets, or how hard you fall, you are never out of the fight."

    #70034
    Evelyn
    @evelyn

    @thewirelessblade Soooo… I’m a beginner too, but there have been some things that have helped me so I might as well throw them out there.

    First, @the-fledgling-artist really has helped me. She’s amazing and so don’t ignore her advice! 😉

    Second, I’ve found that having a sketchbook has really boosted me. Before I had a bunch of loose papers that I would use, but there’s something about having a sketch book that has helped me focus and also see my growth. Don’t know if that makes sense. 😛

    And thirdly, don’t be afraid to use a reference for your picture, especially at the beginning. Someone wise *cough*thefledglingartist*cough* once told me that trying to draw without a reference is like trying to set out on a journey without a map. 😉

    And fourthly, critiques are a good thing and can help you a lot. 🙂

    And lastly, I’ve found looking up tutorials have been really helpful too.

    And @taylorclogston here are a couple ideas.

    For drawing in 2D, if you are copying a picture or image, turn it upside down and copy it that way to help you focus on the shapes and not the end result – to take train yourself to take the picture shape by shape inside of trying to tackle the whole thing. I’ve found this helpful.

    And for 3D, start with how to draw the basic 3D shapes, which you might already know how to do because of geometry in high school. 😉 And then combine them to build objects.

    Anyways take this all with a grain of salt. I’m definitely not an expert and am just suggesting stuff that has helped me here and there. 😛

     

    #70041
    Thomas (CrØss_Bl₳de)
    @thewirelessblade

    @evelyn

    *Sees shapes. Begins to panic* Math…

    *Forum Signature here*

    #70046
    Evelyn
    @evelyn

    @thewirelessblade *freaks out*

    What have I done?? 😮 😛

    Um… no math… *waves hands to distract you* No math in drawing. It’s okay… um… OH LOOK OVER THERE! *points the other way*

    😉

    #70053
    Sarah Inkdragon
    @sarah-inkdragon

    @thewirelessblade @taylorclogston

    I’m pursuing getting an art(well, animation, but that’s still art) degree currently, and I’ve been drawing since I was, well, very small… and the best piece of advice I can give you is honestly just to practice. Over and over and over. No matter what you’re drawing, no matter what style you like, no matter what medium–just draw. I can draw realistic pencil drawings and traditional oil landscapes–but I can also do anime/manga styles, cartoons, graphic design, abstract, watercolor… the way to becoming good at drawing is to draw. Sure, reading books helps, watching videos helps–but the only way you’re ever going to figure out how to shade that one spot or how to create highlights correctly is to try. Keep drawing things over and over, until they look right. It doesn’t have to be the same thing(I’m not telling you to draw hands over and over and over again in the same poses in the same medium), but just sit down with a pencil/pen/paints and draw whatever you like. Landscapes, portraits, abstract–and draw it until you like it.

    That being said, I recommend keeping a sketchbook. Strathmore multimedia sketchbooks are wonderful for drawing in all sorts of mediums–I’ve used them with watercolors, acrylics, colored pencil, markers… anything you can think of. I definitely recommend getting one to start off with.

    Also, learn how to draw basic shapes like those shown above–spheres, triangles, etc. Everything you draw is based off of these shapes. Again, this doesn’t mean to need to fill a sketchbook with squares and circles, but perhaps, one day you try to draw a 3D building, and the next you draw Baymax from Big Hero 6. One is based off a rectangle/square, the second off of spheres/ovals. Drawing a variety of things like this will greatly improve your art, and also your range of art technique. Because if you can draw Baymax and buildings, you will also eventually be able to draw dynamic poses involving lots of movement because you know your basics. The basics are everything in art.

    Lastly–references. If anyone ever tells you references are cheating–they are absolutely wrong. You can’t learn to draw something well if you don’t know what it looks like correctly. So use all the references you want. I like to find some nice poses and perspective references and then print them out and pin them up above my desk so I can always look at them if I need them. Also, references are great for learning movement. There’s lots of loose, fluid poses that you can copy to learn how to draw running, or jumping–or any movement you can think of, really.

    So… yeah. Art is something that can only be learned over time and practice, but if you keep at it, you’ll become really good at it. And the great thing about art is that there’s always something new to try, something new to learn, or something to improve on. You’ll never be perfect with everything–but if you keep trying, you can become really good at about anything.

    I hope this helped! Let me know if you have any questions about anything–technique, art supplies, etc. 😉

    "A hard heart is no infallible protection against a soft head."

    - C. S. Lewis

    #70054
    The Fledgling Artist
    @the-fledgling-artist

    Sarah and Evelyn both gave you fantastic advice, so I don’t have much else to say, but I just wanna mention that you don’t have to do everything at once. I often get overwhelmed over all my artistic weaknesses that need work, but it’s better to start slow and do something then to try to do everything all at once and get frustrated with yourself. You don’t really need lots of fancy supplies either. Sketchbooks are great, but if the cost isn’t convenient for you, getting a cheap folder for all your papers works almost just as well. And there is nothing wrong with using cheap graphite pencils and ballpoint pens. One of my favorite pens to sketch with is a ballpoint pen. 🙂 Okay that’s all. Sorry if you guys are feeling overwhelmed! It can be a lot to take in all at once. I for one did not learn everything I told you in one day, or even a single year.

    "Though I'm not yet who I will be, I'm no longer who I was."

    #70077
    Thomas (CrØss_Bl₳de)
    @thewirelessblade

    Get sketch book. Use references, real or picture. Draw poses. And practice. Got it.

    *Forum Signature here*

    #70286
    Taylor Clogston
    @taylorclogston

    @evelyn @sarah-inkdragon Thanks for the advice and encouragement! I think I didn’t explain what I meant by 3D drawing. Like, when I look at a picture of a flower petal, I want to move my pencil in 3D space around the edge of the petal, like lifting up the pencil and pushing it into the space “into” it, like I was tracing a pencil tip around the edge of a petal in real life. It just feels so wrong to draw things in 2D. I don’t really know how to explain it. Even zooming in so I only see a bit of it still makes it look like a real life object in real space. Maybe this is just a matter of practice, though.

    "...the one with whom he so sought to talk has already interceded for him." -The Master and Margarita

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