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In Which *surprise* My MC Decides to be Difficult

Forums Fiction Characters In Which *surprise* My MC Decides to be Difficult

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  • #38232
    Elizabeth
    @elizabeth

    I have a bad habit of creating difficult characters, guys.

    My current MC didn’t start out difficult, though. His overall personality is just stubborn, which brings me to my problem: he refuses to believe in what he can’t see. And considering that one of the most important parts of my book is when he accepts Christ…that’s an issue.

    How do you take a guy who finds solace in the things he can see and touch and convince him to believe in something he can’t see? How do you make his thought process and final acceptance of God realistic and believable?

    Drop your thoughts below.


    @daeus-lamb
    @kate @josiah

    INTP. Writer of fantasy and sci-fi. Wannabe artist. Anime geek. Merakian.

    #38249
    Samuel
    @samuel

    @elizabeth That sounds like a good arc. Maybe if something in the plot actually forced him to believe in the unseen, or something indisputable happens that he can’t see, it would be easier. For example if such a person were sucked into a fantasy world and were forced to face that things exist that he can’t see, i.e. unicorns, trolls…I don’t know if it’s a fantasy or not but just an example.

    For example if I were to use that fantasy setting, I would set up the character when he is thrown into the plot to reject what he is seeing, assuming all these places and creatures are all a dream, acting bitter toward the land’s inhabitants because of it. He would gradually show signs of softening throughout the plot, and in the climax I would have him be forced to put his complete trust in someone there, and in the resolution it would show him as a changed person because Charlie the Unicorn Banana King saved his life or something like that.

    This may be harder if you don’t have an external antagonist or nothing particularly out-of-the-ordinary in your story, like a romance or something, but I assume the general principle of that arc would remain the same.

    No one reads these anyway

    #38266
    Josiah DeGraaf
    @josiah

    @elizabeth Very slowly. I find it helpful to visualize character arcs as a Venn diagram. The two circles represent the character’s two beliefs he’s working through, and over the course of the story he moves from one side of the diagram to the other. This means that most of the time is spent in the middle where he feels caught between two contrary beliefs. If you’re trying to have him convert over a short period of time, it isn’t going to work. If you give him a lot of small steps he can take to make that large step, it will work much more effectively.

    Lit fanatic. Eclectic reader. Theology nerd. Writing fantasy at https://josiahdegraaf.com

    #38267
    Elizabeth
    @elizabeth

    Right, that makes sense.

    The problem, though, is that this is my short story entry for the contest…realistically speaking, would it be easier to find some other way to bring Christ into the story? I don’t want to rush anything. What would you do, @josiah?

    INTP. Writer of fantasy and sci-fi. Wannabe artist. Anime geek. Merakian.

    #38268
    Josiah DeGraaf
    @josiah

    @elizabeth Personally I’m not sure that it’s possible to give someone a full conversion character arc in a short story. Definitely not in their stubborn. David Foster Wallace’s “Good People” does the best job I’ve seen of a conversion in a short story, and it neither begins at the beginning of an arc or ends at the end of it. It’s all in the middle. I wouldn’t recommend attempting a full arc like this in a short story.

    Lit fanatic. Eclectic reader. Theology nerd. Writing fantasy at https://josiahdegraaf.com

    #38269
    Elizabeth
    @elizabeth

    Alright. Thanks.

     

    INTP. Writer of fantasy and sci-fi. Wannabe artist. Anime geek. Merakian.

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