How to avoid pre-writing-burnout

Forums Fiction Plotting How to avoid pre-writing-burnout

This topic contains 17 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Bekah 6 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
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  • #68711

    Michaela
    @mgtask

      Hey Everyone!

      I’ve been thinking a lot about plotting/pre-writing. I generally don’t like to prewrite. I’m a total pantser who runs off of the evasive, ever-fleeting fuel of creative whims. However, these whims rarely come. So, just last week, I decided to write a short story I thought of years ago but never successfully finished. I decided to do some plotting/outlining before I began. The problem is, I ran into countless unanswered questions and plotholes. I finally got so bogged with tying together all the random pieces that my creative energy left entirely. I got tired of the story. Do you have any advice for plotting/pre-writing without getting bored and burned-out before you even start writing?

      #68726

      R.M. Archer
      @r-m-archer

      I struggle with this, too. I found out last year that my writing is way better with an outline… but I never want to actually sit down and do it, and it bores me, and I’m bad at it, so a lot of my stories haven’t gotten written because I know they need planning and I don’t want to do the planning. XP

      Fantasy/dystopian/sci-fi author. Mythology nerd. ENFP. Singer.

      #68755

      Eden Anderson
      @eden-anderson

      @r-m-archer

      I struggle with this, too. I found out last year that my writing is way better with an outline… but I never want to actually sit down and do it, and it bores me, and I’m bad at it, so a lot of my stories haven’t gotten written because I know they need planning and I don’t want to do the planning. XP

      We must be related…😉

      "But how could you live and have no story to tell?" - Fyodor Dostoyevsky

      #68799

      Thomas (CrØss_Bl₳de)
      @thewirelessblade

      I’m hoping onto this boat, I’m going through the same thing.

      *Forum Signature here*

      #68864

      The Fledgling Artist
      @the-fledgling-artist

      I’m kinda struggling with this too.. Though I’m not so sure that it’s because I’m bored of outlining so much as I’m afraid to commit to any important decisions, and therefore procrastinating. *-*

      "Though I'm not yet who I will be, I'm no longer who I was."

      #68891

      R.M. Archer
      @r-m-archer

      So… just a thought I had earlier that I figured it couldn’t help to throw out there: what if you write your first draft as if it’s an outline? Not writing-wise, but mentality-wise. Write the draft like you would a draft, but with the intention of looking back on it afterward as a framework to tweak and entirely rewrite. A lot of people refer to this as draft 0 and it’s something I’ve never thought I would make use of, but it could be helpful in a situation like this.

      (Hopefully that came out intelligible. It’s 1 a.m. here, lol.)

      Fantasy/dystopian/sci-fi author. Mythology nerd. ENFP. Singer.

      #68960

      Evelyn
      @evelyn

      @mgtask @r-m-archer @eden-anderson @thewirelessblade @the-fledgling-artist

      Hey everyone!

      Just popping in to throw some ideas and tips out. 😉

      Mentally:

      It helps me to get someone else excited about my project. And preferably someone I know and someone I see often so they keep asking about it and keep me accountable for it, and to give me the energy to keep going just by being excited. 🙂

      Also, I’ve found for working out plot holes and things like that talking about it out loud to a person, even if they don’t ask questions or pay attention, can be very helpful for me. Guess I’m a verbal processor? *shrugs*

      Physically:

      On a day to day basis of getting bogged down, it helps me to take walks or get up and stretch every hour or so. Do the Pooh Bear exercise. “Up, down, touch the ground.” 😉 Or wall sits. Or cartwheels outside. Just something to get up from the computer.

      Finger exercises are good too, and neck exercises, and also, eye exercises to keep them from aching due to staring at the screen for long periods of time.

      Take a deep breath and look away from your screen. Focus on something far away, such as a tree out your window, a field across the street, or something like that. Count up to twenty and cover your eyes for a little bit, then focus on the distant object again.

      Making sure you’re not slouching over your screen is a good thing too. And sisters who give amazing back massages. 😉

      You guys might not have been thinking of a physical burnout here, but I find that its really important to take care of your self physically to keep yourself from getting achy and grumpy which then makes you miserable and then sick of writing. 😛 (Speaking from personal experience here.)

      Anyways, I hope that was somewhat helpful. It might not have been exactly what you were looking for, but it helps me get through projects. 🙂

      #68999

      Michaela
      @mgtask

        Thank you! I might try that!

         

        #69000

        Michaela
        @mgtask

          I like these ideas. Thanks Evelyn!

          #69122

          R.M. Archer
          @r-m-archer

          So… just a thought I had earlier that I figured it couldn’t help to throw out there: what if you write your first draft as if it’s an outline? Not writing-wise, but mentality-wise. Write the draft like you would a draft, but with the intention of looking back on it afterward as a framework to tweak and entirely rewrite. A lot of people refer to this as draft 0 and it’s something I’ve never thought I would make use of, but it could be helpful in a situation like this. (Hopefully that came out intelligible. It’s 1 a.m. here, lol.)

          So now that it’s not 1 a.m., I’ve thought over this a little bit more and I’d like to add that with a draft 0 you could totally skip scenes or chapters and put placeholders and notes for yourself there instead if you didn’t feel like writing them, because it’s more of an outline than a draft anyway. (I’ve actually done this in one of my first drafts.) You don’t have to write the entire thing like a normal draft.

          Fantasy/dystopian/sci-fi author. Mythology nerd. ENFP. Singer.

          #69153

          Eden Anderson
          @eden-anderson

          @evelyn

          Ohhh, those are great ideas!! Thanks for sharing! I’m a verbal processor too…I’m so bad that I can’t even really figure stuff out (whether emotionally or spiritually or whatever) without talking it through. 😉

          @r-m-archer

          I have never even heard of this before! But thanks for sharing…I’m gonna keep that in mind.

          "But how could you live and have no story to tell?" - Fyodor Dostoyevsky

          #69158

          R.M. Archer
          @r-m-archer

          @eden-anderson

          I’m glad I could help. 🙂

          Fantasy/dystopian/sci-fi author. Mythology nerd. ENFP. Singer.

          #69159

          Thomas (CrØss_Bl₳de)
          @thewirelessblade

          @r-m-archer

          Why didn’t I think of this before!

          I’M FREEE!!!

          *Forum Signature here*

          #69160

          R.M. Archer
          @r-m-archer

          @thewirelessblade

          XD XD XD Glad to be of service.

          Fantasy/dystopian/sci-fi author. Mythology nerd. ENFP. Singer.

          #69164

          Evelyn
          @evelyn

          @mgtask No problem!

          @eden-anderson Eyyy! Twins! 😉

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