For All The Historical Fictioners

Forums Fiction General Writing Discussions For All The Historical Fictioners

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This topic contains 332 replies, has 17 voices, and was last updated by  Selah 3 days, 2 hours ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 286 through 300 (of 333 total)
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  • #82635

    valtmy
    @valtmy

      @seekjustice

      Yes, I love it when love triangle are used as a vehicle to present a moral choice than merely having it be about ‘feelings’ and superficial attraction. 😀 Though I am surprised since I thought you didn’t like Austen. 😛

      For the A likes B but B likes C sort… I would usually only like it if B’s feelings are reciprocated and B and C are in an established relationship. Otherwise if A is presented too sympathetically, I will get frustrated with B for continuing to hang onto C who is clearly not interested instead of giving A a bit more consideration.

      #82746

      Eden Anderson
      @eden-anderson

      @valtmy

      I agree that there has to be more at stake in the story than whether the couple gets together or not.

      Exactly.

      "But how could you live and have no story to tell?" - Fyodor Dostoyevsky

      #82778

      E. Veryone
      @e_elaine_soup5

      guys, I’m being a total hypocrite, but

      i’m writing a love triangle into A Capricorn and an Aries 

      *cringes*

      Confused=my permanent state of mind
      warning! Massively impatient!

      #82805

      Moonlighting Novelist
      @moonlighting-novelist

      Hello, Historical Fictioners!! (A great name, @seekjustice!)

      I’ve had the best time reading over this thread for the last week! So glad to join in.

      My favorite time periods are: Victorian America and Britain, but I love history between 1800 to about 1930. It’s the most interesting to me. I also find ancient Egypt fascinating. I don’t have a lot of real historical figures that I particularly like, but I have developed an interest in the Vanderbilt family, due to my visit to their country estate, Biltmore. It’s a beautiful place, and I found the history around it fun to learn, as if falls squarely in my era of interest.

      My two favorite books are: Jane Eyre and Pride and Prejudice. I also really liked North and South, Anna Karenina, and War and Peace. I’m VERY fond of Elizabeth Peters’ Amelia Peabody series, a mystery series set in late 1800s/early 1900s England and Egypt. I’ve also enjoyed some historical romances by authors Deeanne Gist and Colleen Coble. I’m not familiar with lot of the authors mentioned on this thread…I’ve read a lot of books, but probably within a pretty narrow window. I also enjoy reading non-fiction history books, especially about life and culture of the past.

      I’m currently editing the draft of my first complete novel. Set in post Civil War Richmond, VA, the story of the daughter of a former plantation owner unfolds as she discovers love for the first time, but not quite in the way she imagined it. She finds love rather unexpectedly. This story is intended to be a romance, but also has a little mystery/suspense. I had the basic premise and characters sketched out, but I pantsed most of it, just seeing where the story took me. Needless to say, at the end of the draft, I had a decent story that needed quite a bit of tweaking and some rewriting in order to make the plot work better. Still working on those edits. Given the era and placement of my WIP, I greatly enjoyed the conversation between @rochellaine and @eden-anderson about the American Civil War. @rochellaine, you gave wonderful insight. I very much agree with you. 🙂

      "There is no charm equal to tenderness of heart."
      -Jane Austen, "Emma"

      #82810

      SeekJustice
      @seekjustice

      @moonlighting-novelist

      Welcome to the best thread on the forum! It’s always exciting to add a new historical fictioner, because we’re a little bit rare around here. 😀 I can’t wait to have you participating in our discussions!

      Crazy INFP, writer, dancer, musical fanatic.
      Seek justice, love mercy, walk humbly with your God

      #82829

      SeekJustice
      @seekjustice

      Here’s our discussion question for the week. It’s a bit more serious than the last few and I’m really interested to hear your opinions.

      How do you, personally, strike a balance between historical accuracy and ideas and beliefs that are now considered outdated or offensive (for example, views on slavery, colonialism, women, etc)? 

      @rochellaine @valtmy @moonlighting-novelist @samantha-pen @e_elaine_soup5 (I think that’s everyone who isn’t subscribed)

      Crazy INFP, writer, dancer, musical fanatic.
      Seek justice, love mercy, walk humbly with your God

      #82852

      E. Veryone
      @e_elaine_soup5

      If your talking accuracy, yes those should be added in somewhere, but something/someone is nice or against that type of thing and the woman may get treated better.

      Women were treated like they knew nothing but fancy stuff and were contrary, right? Well, in the Agency the women of the agency use this to their spy’s advantage. in most of Melanie Dickerson’s books, she has someone treat the main heroine well and nicely, The Hunter of Thornbrook for example. Odette is 21 and not married, and her uncle is fine with that. He lets her chose who she marries, even though they may not be wealthy.

      Confused=my permanent state of mind
      warning! Massively impatient!

      #82872

      Eden Anderson
      @eden-anderson

      @moonlighting-novelist

      YAY!! You came over! *throws confetti* 😄

      Given the era and placement of my WIP, I greatly enjoyed the conversation between @rochellaine and @eden-anderson about the American Civil War. @rochellaine, you gave wonderful insight. I very much agree with you. 🙂

      Um…*cough* heh…that conversation was kind of embarrassing, because the story was pretty horrendous and I really had no idea what I was talking about. 🤦

      "But how could you live and have no story to tell?" - Fyodor Dostoyevsky

      #82876

      Ariel Ashira
      @ashira

      @seekjustice Ooh, good question!  Personally, I feel strongly that both historical accuracy and Biblical truth should be displayed fully.  Like, if I portray racism as it really was between whites and black and indians in the 18oos, I also have in the story what is the truth about racism.   I dont feel like I should leave out realistic views of their time just because people today might find it offensive.  History is offensive!  Stuff that happens today if very offensive!  I’m not gonna shy away from acuracy or truth because it might hurt feelings of someone who might need to do some more thinking about their past, how it affects the future and the present, and how God and the Bible plays into it all in every age of history.

      "In a mask, was he?"

      #82890

      Eden Anderson
      @eden-anderson

      @seekjustice

      What a great question! This is actually something I’ve been thinking about recently. I agree with @ashira that history is offensive and we can’t shy away from talking about something just because it makes some people mad or uncomfortable. Yes, it’s very, very important that we present the truth in love, but that doesn’t mean that we soften it down so everybody will be happy. (But that wasn’t really your question. 😛)

      While I love history, I haven’t written much his-fic, so I don’t feel like I really have the authority to answer you question. I have ideas of how I am going to present “outdated or offensive” views, but I’ve never actually put them into practice.

      "But how could you live and have no story to tell?" - Fyodor Dostoyevsky

      #82979

      Moonlighting Novelist
      @moonlighting-novelist

      @seekjustice

      Thank you! I might be slightly biased, but I think this IS the best thread on the forum… 😀 So excited to be here!!

      @eden-anderson

      Thanks for the confetti greeting!! And for directing me here. 🙂

      Couldn’t get the quote thing to work… *rolls eyes* but that conversation was not embarrassing. That’s how you learn, how you get better. I don’t think it was a horrible story idea, you just needed to brainstorm some ideas with fellow historical fictioners. 🙂

      "There is no charm equal to tenderness of heart."
      -Jane Austen, "Emma"

      #82994

      Selah
      @selah-chelyah

      @e_elaine_soup5

      Hey, welcome to the his-fic thread! 🙂

      @moonlighting-novelist

      Hey, she’s here! 😀

      @rochellaine

      *double high-fives*

      @seekjustice

      Great question! I love stuff that makes you think… 😛

      I believe that you should portray the typical beliefs of people in the given era correctly…so they should have the historically correct view that they would have for real. But for me, that would change by the end of the book. I a realistic manner they would come to realize the truth about the given subject or issue, and change their beliefs.

      Is that what you were asking?

      ~ 'Every Christian is either a missionary or an impostor.' C.H. Spurgeon ~

      #83023

      valtmy
      @valtmy

        @seekjustice

        I care for neither historical accuracy nor modern sensibilities. The settings of my stories are versions of history that are as horrible, fantastical or sanitised as I need them to be. They exist only to provide a place for my characters to live and for the plot to happen. Story is king. 😛

        OK, basically, from what you have read of QOD, I think you already have an idea as to my frame of mind on handling these issues (i.e. Yes, women are expected to be subservient and become housewives. Yes, there are slaves in this society which is Bad. Now let’s move on with the plot). While I aim to at least acknowledge that such ideas and beliefs existed in the society, I do not mind taking historical liberties (e.g. giving my female characters a bit more freedom and agency than they actually would have) to suit my story. I do not like to dwell and lament too much on historical injustices because I think that it encourages modern chauvinism (also my personal opinion is that stories about oppression = cheesy drama, cheap sympathy, passive characters = boredom).

        However, I think the best way to write about the ugly sides of history is through good character writing. Get into your characters’ heads, dare to make them the products of their society without flinching. Help the reader understand why the people of that time did what they did and believed what they believed. Put both the ‘powerful’ and ‘powerless’ characters into a wide variety of situations that allow for different emotional responses and qualities (good and bad) to be demonstrated. Show that these characters have thoughts, issues and concerns outside of the Great Bigotry or whatnot so that they all feel alive and human. Then, show the evil and pain caused by the actions of the oppressors to highlight the tragedy of the injustice.

        #83054

        Moonlighting Novelist
        @moonlighting-novelist

        @seekjustice

        That IS a good question. I think @ashira put it very well. Historical accuracy is always in the forefront, and should also be countered with biblical truth. Sometimes I write as though I assume the reader will understand the historical context of the situation. Conversely, I do sometimes struggle with showing what’s common for the time period with out over explaining. I’m finding sometimes both ways are necessary…there are times to elaborate, and times to leave it in the reader’s hands. But I do NOT feel I should ever shy away from a controversial subject if its historical accuracy is integral to my story.

        "There is no charm equal to tenderness of heart."
        -Jane Austen, "Emma"

        #83070

        Moonlighting Novelist
        @moonlighting-novelist

        @selah-chelyah

        Hello, Selah! *waves*

        I like what you said about portraying the typical beliefs of people from the given era correctly. I think it’s important to try to step into our characters’ shoes.

        @valtmy

        Your last paragraph…YES. Characters are the key.

        "There is no charm equal to tenderness of heart."
        -Jane Austen, "Emma"

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