For All The Historical Fictioners

Forums Fiction General Writing Discussions For All The Historical Fictioners

This topic contains 341 replies, has 18 voices, and was last updated by  valtmy 1 week, 2 days ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 342 total)
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  • #54925

    valtmy
    @valtmy

      @selah-chelyah

      No, I have not really read about the history of India and Nepal. Any particular historical events/people etc. to suggest for me to check out? 😛

      @seekjustice

      Haha. How do my areas of interest being different excuse me from making my settings historically accurate in order to become an “honourable” historical fictioner? 😛

      Yes, I was referring to the mother of Marie Antoinette.

      #54943

      Eden Anderson
      @eden-anderson

      @seekjustice

      Sure. 😀 I don’t mind at all…here’s one of them.

      I came up with this plot line a couple years ago…it’s pretty sketchy, with lots of plot holes and dead ends…but hope it makes sense anyway. 🙂

      So, it’s about this rich southern guy who helps runaway slaves, and it’s set shortly before the Civil War. Somehow, (I haven’t figured it out yet) this guy, named Stanley who is from South Carolina, visits New York for an extended period of time, falls in love with a hard core Yankee girl, and develops a hate for the corrupted slave system. (It’s a huge plot hole, I know. *sigh*) Anyway, this creates a few problems, because his father owns a big plantation and as the only son, Stanley will one day inherit it. When his father learns that he’s going to marry a “northern” girl, he’s furious, and presents Stanley with a choice: ditch the girl or forfeit your inheritance. (I don’t know if that’s even realistic…) Stanley chooses the girl, and they move back to South Carolina, and he becomes a printer. Long story short, he hides slaves in his print shop and house, but his wife has no clue…and she’s less than impressed when she finds out that he didn’t trust her enough to tell her. Other random plot twists were that they could haven’t any kids so they adopt a little slave child when it’s mother dies on the road to freedom, and Stanley is mortified when he realizes that he has at least five step-siblings…kids that his dad fathered with various slave women. (That was a HUGE thing during that time period…for slave masters to have kids by their female slaves and then quick sell off the kids, because they were ashamed of having them around…it’s heart-breaking but true.)

      Another plot line, and more recent, was a comedy about a girl whose mother and three spinster aunts try to set her up with numerous guys and it goes horribly wrong. It’s set late nineteenth century, in a small town in northeastern U.S.

      I think my biggest problem with these was I became overwhelmed with the research…and I also thought the plot lines were kinda cheesy. I don’t know, maybe I’ll resurrect them some day. 😀

      Your work in progress looks super interesting.

      "But how could you live and have no story to tell?" - Fyodor Dostoyevsky

      #54994

      Ariel Ashira
      @ashira

      @eden-anderson Your plot sounds cool.

      When his father learns that he’s going to marry a “northern” girl, he’s furious, and presents Stanley with a choice: ditch the girl or forfeit your inheritance. (I don’t know if that’s even realistic…) 

      Actually I have read a lot of books where that happens if the guys want to marry someone his parents don’t approve of.

      "No matter how much it hurts, how dark it gets, or how hard you fall, you are never out of the fight."

      #55014

      Eden Anderson
      @eden-anderson

      @ashira

      Thank you! 😀

      Why I said that I didn’t know if it was realistic is because I didn’t know how much that particular thing happened during that time period. I want my stories to be historically accurate.

      Sometimes it feels like authors take twenty-first century people with very modern mindsets, plop them down in a certain historical time period, and BOOM! it’s historical fiction. When really that’s not how people of that time period would have acted at all…their mindsets were totally different. I want to make sure I avoid that problem.

      "But how could you live and have no story to tell?" - Fyodor Dostoyevsky

      #55021

      Ariel Ashira
      @ashira

      @eden-anderson Haha, totally!  Glad you feel that way, so do I.

      "No matter how much it hurts, how dark it gets, or how hard you fall, you are never out of the fight."

      #55065

      Rochellaine
      @rochellaine

        @eden-anderson May I comment on your Civil War story premise?  Specifically with regards to your comments about historical accuracy and realistic or cliched plot lines.

        Nonsense makes the heart grow fonder ~ Carolyn Wells

        #55066

        Selah
        @selah-chelyah

        @valtmy Not particularly… :_

        @eden-anderson  Cool plot line! Yes, I agree and am glad that you feel that way about his-fic. If you write it, write a realistic story!

        "Get wet and sandy!" ~Instructor Reno
        "You will show respect!" ~The Bearded One

        #55072

        Eden Anderson
        @eden-anderson

        @rochellaine

        YES!!! By all means! 😀 I’m a novice in all of this, so any tips, suggestion, advice or condemnation is welcome. 😉

        @selah-chelyah

        Thank you…it still needs lots and lots of help.

        "But how could you live and have no story to tell?" - Fyodor Dostoyevsky

        #55075

        Rochellaine
        @rochellaine

          @eden-anderson 🙂 Okay, in that case, here goes! 😉

          The first thing to note when you’re in the process of planning a story based on the American Civil War, is that there are still people who believe adamantly both sides of the question, and there are a lot of people in the middle as well.  When you write about WWII, the Nazis are the bad guys, and that’s all there is to it.  With the Civil War, it’s important to be aware of your target audience and be prepared for the fact that if you choose a side, the audience may grow smaller or larger depending on where and how you market the book.  From what I’ve seen in your synopsis you seem to be leaning toward the North, and are possibly a fully convinced Northern supporter.

          But it’s not really that big a deal which side you’re on, it’s more of a big deal how you portray each side, and the backgrounds behind each side, and this is where historical accuracy comes in.  I’m going to ask here if you know the full background of how the Civil War started, about the Western states being added to the Union and the cotton industry’s need for survival.  So, have you studied that, and to what extent?  Or are you merely interested in the slavery and “underground railroad” aspects of the Civil War?  Because if you know all about it already 😉 I don’t need to go into great detail about it, and in my next post I can just give you a few plot points and historical details that I think might help with manufacturing a more interesting and less cliched story.  I just wanted to start there because I think that’s the biggest thing makes Civil War stories accurate or inaccurate.

          Nonsense makes the heart grow fonder ~ Carolyn Wells

          #55078

          Selah
          @selah-chelyah

          @rochellaine  Yes! Have you ever read any of Amy Carmichael`s books? They are amazing! I have studied India + her life quite a bit! :_  I really like Grace Livingstone Hill, as well.

          “Bad guy” What!? He is a terribly interesting historical figure!

           

          "Get wet and sandy!" ~Instructor Reno
          "You will show respect!" ~The Bearded One

          #55080

          Rochellaine
          @rochellaine

            @selah-chelyah I liked Mimosa a lot.  I think I may have read another of Amy Carmichael’s books, but I’m not sure.  It’s been a while since I read Mimosa.

            Who, the Red Baron?  I was kind of kidding.  @seekjustice and I have talked about him before, and I knew she liked him a lot.  But, I was really, really into WWI a while ago, and read a lot of American books written in that era, where he’s feared and hated, so I’m basically coming from the perspective of a 1910’s American when I say he’s a “bad guy”.  I haven’t actually studied him, specifically, and like I said, I was joking.  To the Germans he was a hero. 😉

            Nonsense makes the heart grow fonder ~ Carolyn Wells

            #55083

            Selah
            @selah-chelyah

            @rochellaine  Me too, it was an amazing book! I have like 6 of her books.

            Haha! That is funny about the Red Baron. :_ I really enjoy studying him, though! Yeah…. have you seen the movie, “The Red Baron”?

            "Get wet and sandy!" ~Instructor Reno
            "You will show respect!" ~The Bearded One

            #55085

            Rochellaine
            @rochellaine

              @selah-chelyah No I haven’t… *whispers* Is it historically accurate? 😛

              Nonsense makes the heart grow fonder ~ Carolyn Wells

              #55087

              Selah
              @selah-chelyah

              @rochellaine  I think so… it is more like a documentary of his life, than a movie! Here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=spymSdZiv9Q

              “To our friend and enemy, Manfred von Richthofen.”  Love that quote! :_

              "Get wet and sandy!" ~Instructor Reno
              "You will show respect!" ~The Bearded One

              #55088

              Eden Anderson
              @eden-anderson

              @rochellaine

              Wow!! This is awesome! This is the whole reason I joined the SE forum…because I know  I have so much room for growth and there are lots of people who know things that I don’t…and I want to be able to discuss and grow and learn. Thanks for all the thought you put into this reply.

              First off this really has nothing to do with the story but are you from the south? And yes, I’m from the north, way up there next to New York to be exact. 😀  And yes, I believe that slavery is wrong and the things that happened to the African-American people in this country was heart-breaking and that the whole argument between the North and the South was very unfortunate. And, yes, the more I look into it the more I realize how much more there is to learn. 😀

              Now, a disclaimer. I started forming this plot a few years ago…and I think I’ve come at least a little ways from there. Back than I really had no idea how to form a plot or how to make stuff fit together and I definitely wasn’t thinking about my target audience. I was just writing it for fun, basically and other reasons I’ll mention.

              To answer your questions: I’m fairly familiar with what started the Civil War…The Northern States wanted to outlaw slavery but the South was so dependent on the slaves, having built up an entire culture and lifestyle around their industry, and if the slaves were freed, the whole thing could come crashing down around their heads. It would shake the very foundation of their culture and society. At least that’s my understanding of it. There was a lot more things that tied into it as well. (Yeah, I know that was vague…😛) About the western states, I don’t know what you are referring to specifically. About the cotton, yeah, the south and the north used it and it was pretty important to the United States during that time. Back when I was creating my plot I did some basic research, not extensive though. Here’s some of the books I read:

              Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad – Eric Foner (great book, by the way)

              Bound for the Promised Land: Harriet Tubman, Portrait of an American Hero – Kate Clifford Larson

              Women of the South in the War Times– compiled by Matthew Page Andrews

              Narrative of the Life of Fredrick Douglas, An American Slave, Written by Himself

              Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Written by Herself – Harriet A. Jacobs

              I kept lots of notes, filling multiple notebooks. I also did some study of the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 and The Dred Scott Decision of 1857.

              I wasn’t really concerned about condoning or condemning a certain side…I just wanted to tell the story of a man who had to make a hard decision. I wanted to show the hardships and struggles of that time period from both sides…people on both sides knew grief and pain and all had injustices done to them. And I’m just gonna repeat what I said before: the plot did have serious issues, I was a very much beginner, and there was a lot of stuff I didn’t even think of. (Funny fact…I kept a page in my notebook that was titled: Faults in the Plot and I listed all the stuff that was wrong with my story. That was depressing. 😆😆)

              I’m getting the feeling that you know a lot more about the civil war than I do, so I’d be happy to hear what you think is cliched in my story and anything else you have to offer. I want to think of myself as open minded so…PREACH, SISTER!! 😀 I’ve got lots to learn.

              "But how could you live and have no story to tell?" - Fyodor Dostoyevsky

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