For All The Historical Fictioners

Forums Fiction General Writing Discussions For All The Historical Fictioners

This topic contains 341 replies, has 18 voices, and was last updated by  valtmy 1 week, 2 days ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 256 through 270 (of 342 total)
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  • #81116

    Ariel Ashira
    @ashira

    @scarlet-immortalized Totally BIZZARE!  Goodness, what if one of your relatives had died from drowning in molasses!?

    "No matter how much it hurts, how dark it gets, or how hard you fall, you are never out of the fight."

    #81926

    SeekJustice
    @seekjustice

    Question of the week!

    Do you like (or would you be prepared to read) historical fantasy/steampunk/alternate history, or any of those genres that purposely bend and play with history? If you do read those genres, what is your favourite book?

    @valtmy @rochellaine @ashira @selah-chelyah @samantha-pen @scarletimmortalized @michelle And everyone else

    (Just out of curiosity, and because I don’t like writing out your tags everytime and inevitably forgetting one of you, how many of you are subscribed to this topic?)

    Crazy INFP, writer, dancer, musical fanatic.
    Seek justice, love mercy, walk humbly with your God

    #81938

    valtmy
    @valtmy

      @seekjustice

      Historical fantasy: Of course I would read this, since QOD is a historical fantasy (or at least a misappropriation of Korean history. I justify this by saying that modern Korea’s obsession with celebrities, appearance and plastic surgery makes their society a perfect vehicle for my story themes) 😛

      Steampunk: My view is that this is more of an aesthetic than a real genre. It is a cool aesthetic but I cannot off the top of my head think of any steampunk story that truly garnered my interest. I am half-considering putting my lawyer/detective story idea in a steampunk setting though.

      Alternate history: Again a cool idea but I have seen very few alternate history concepts that caught my interest for long.

      My favourite work in these genres is not a book but a Japanese manga called Ooku. It is set in an alternate Edo Japan where an ongoing epidemic has caused a thinning of the male population so there is a gender imbalance of 4 women to 1 man. As a result women have had to take up positions of power and since there are so few healthy and virile men, they are kept as valuable seed stock, used essentially as prostitutes. The manga is a generational saga that follows the lives of each of the Tokugawa shoguns (who are reimagined as women) and their concubines (who are reimagined as men). I like this story for its character study that explores what it is like to live in such a crazy society and also its political intrigue that references and gives alternate explanations for real life historical events and struggles (e.g. Japan’s isolation policy is explained as, since they have such a grave gender imbalance and few fighting men, exposing the country to foreigners would make Japan vulnerable to attack by the other countries which have healthy male populations).

      (Sorry, I’m not subscribed but I do come by from time to time when I see that there are new posts) 😛

      #81957

      Michelle Rose
      @michelle

        @seekjustice I gotta tell you, I love historical fantasy partly because that is one of the genres I write, It’s great reasons being you get a historical setting but you also get things like talking animals. On the other hand, steampunk, I just never could get my head around why It’s so popular and why the big hubbub lol, maybe it’s just sort of lost on me because it’s just not my thing. But hey, if you know of an awesome steampunk book that has NO ROMANCE in it let me know I will give it a try:) Alternate history………*silence* umm I will have to think about that one.

        #82003

        Ariel Ashira
        @ashira

        @seekjustice I dont read those genres much at all…

        And yea, I subscribe to this topic!!

        "No matter how much it hurts, how dark it gets, or how hard you fall, you are never out of the fight."

        #82034

        Selah
        @selah-chelyah

        @seekjustice

        No, I don’t really read those genres. It kinda seems like it defeats the purpose of true his-fic…to write accurate, awesome history as it really happened, and to craft your characters around that! So no, not really at all. How about you?

        Yep, you better believe I am subscribed to this topic. Absolutely! 😀

        "Get wet and sandy!" ~Instructor Reno
        "You will show respect!" ~The Bearded One

        #82055

        Eden Anderson
        @eden-anderson

        @seekjustice

        Well, I’ve always loved history and the stories of past peoples and times always filled me with wonder and excitment. (And horror, depending on what particular thing I was reading about.)

        And so I’ve always kinda resisted the idea of bending history and making a fantasy novel out of it. It felt so…wrong. Because I value history and learning from the past, I believe that the stories of history need to be told. It feels wrong to change the stories and add stuff like magic and dragons. It feels like you are presenting a false view of history. I am still kinda that way, but I am trying to be open minded. (I am reading Fawkes right now and believe it or not, I am actually enjoying it. 😁)

        I suppose, that by writing historical fantasy you could pull in otherwise hesitant readers and get them interested in history so that they go and learn about the real events and what actually happened. That would be cool! 🙂

        I’m not a steampunk fan so yeah, I don’t really read it.

        Yes, I am subscribed to this thread!

        "But how could you live and have no story to tell?" - Fyodor Dostoyevsky

        #82117

        SeekJustice
        @seekjustice

        @valtmy

        That manga sounds really interesting! I especially like the alternate idea of Japan’s isolation. If I ever come across it, I’ll definitely read it. I also share your views on alternate history. I’ve only read one alternate history that I really enjoyed. It also, I guess, fell into the category of steampunk (Scott Westerfield’s Leviathan and sequels, in case you’re wondering).

        @michelle

        I agree that historical fantasy is really cool! I also like writing it 😀 The series I mentioned above has very little romance in it and is a steampunk/alternate history of WW1. There’s a bit of romance in the last book, but it’s actually surprisingly romance free.

        @ashira @selah-chelyah I had a feeling you guys wouldn’t read much of that sort of thing. That’s okay though 🙂 It has to be a very good sample of fantasy/steampunk/alternate for me to enjoy it.

        @eden-anderson

        That’s how I’ve viewed it most of my life, but now I think that those subgenres have the ability to appeal to a crossover audience, and that’s part of their allure. For example, a hardcore fantasy fan might not be willing to pick up a novel set in Tudor England, but they might be willing to pick up Fawkes. that way they’ll still have their dose of fantasy and magic, but they also have the added benefit of easing themselves into the historical genre and learning about the Gunpowder Plot and the tension between Catholic and Protestant England (and take all the mask magic out of Fawkes, and its really historically accurate. Nadine Brandes did a great job at blending the magic and history).

         

         

        Crazy INFP, writer, dancer, musical fanatic.
        Seek justice, love mercy, walk humbly with your God

        #82121

        E. Veryone
        @e_elaine_soup5

        Oh!

        I like this question!

        So, I’ve been getting into some good historical fiction/historical AU series rn and I have a bunch to tell you.

        First, it’s the Leviathan series by Scott Westerfeld. He writes about an alternate universe WWI in which the Triple Entente has the ability to make mutant creatures and the Central powers have mech-like things.

        Second, its The Agency. I think it’s set in late 1900s, and is about a girl that is in a woman spy in a world that doesn’t believe that women are worth anything.

        Third, it’s the Stranje House novels. Early 1800s, these girls are outcasts and sent to a boarding schools that is supposed to whip them into shape with a torturous system. Though, this school teaches the girls to hone their abilities. I believe that only the first book is good, but you may read as needed.

        Fourth is the Flame in the Mist series. Set in shogunate japan, one girl defies rules.

        characters are like geodes: you must break them to see what they're made of

        #82131

        SeekJustice
        @seekjustice

        @e_elaine_soup5

        Welcome to the historical fictioners thread!

        I mentioned Leviathan to a few other people who posted here! Its really good 🙂

        I haven’t read those other ones, but Flame in the Mist is good! (I haven’t read the sequel yet).

        Crazy INFP, writer, dancer, musical fanatic.
        Seek justice, love mercy, walk humbly with your God

        #82133

        Michelle Rose
        @michelle

          @seekjustice Yay a fellow historical fantasy writer!! It’s a great genre because you can add stuff like this to historical fantasy “Ancient goblins, and warlords Come out of the ground, not making a sound The smell of death is all around.” I think that’s just awesome:D I’m not sure why I HATE ROMANCE, I just do lol.

          #82136

          E. Veryone
          @e_elaine_soup5

          I love romance!

          characters are like geodes: you must break them to see what they're made of

          #82156

          Michelle Rose
          @michelle

            @e_elaine_soup5 Hi Elaine, may I ask why? 🙂

            #82162

            E. Veryone
            @e_elaine_soup5

            It’s probably because I don’t have it in my life right now

            characters are like geodes: you must break them to see what they're made of

            #82170

            Eden Anderson
            @eden-anderson

            @seekjustice

            That’s how I’ve viewed it most of my life, but now I think that those subgenres have the ability to appeal to a crossover audience, and that’s part of their allure. For example, a hardcore fantasy fan might not be willing to pick up a novel set in Tudor England, but they might be willing to pick up Fawkes. that way they’ll still have their dose of fantasy and magic, but they also have the added benefit of easing themselves into the historical genre and learning about the Gunpowder Plot and the tension between Catholic and Protestant England (and take all the mask magic out of Fawkes, and its really historically accurate. Nadine Brandes did a great job at blending the magic and history).

            I like how you phrased that…and yes, I’m starting to see that and agree with you. 😄 (I promise that I’m trying to start branching out and reading other genres and not be so stick in the mud. 😛 Although I do love my dear old classics. *hugs classics*)

            @e_elaine_soup5

            Hey, *cough* I wasn’t going to say anything because I was in the minority but I love romance too. (Provided it’s done well. 🙃)

            "But how could you live and have no story to tell?" - Fyodor Dostoyevsky

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