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  • #32541
    Sarah Narnathron
    @sarah-narnathron

    Hey’a, all!

    I’m Sarah Narnathron (not my real name), but you might know me elsewhere on the internet as Leilani Sunblade or sarahtps. I’m a writer of Christian fantasy in a lot of subgenres: high and low fantasy, retellings, steampunk, portal, the list goes on. I’m also a student at a Christian university, studying Professional Writing and Information Design with a minor in Graphic Design. And as far as personality goes, I’m an ISTP/J (which I act more like depends on the situation) and a Type 6 (possibly with a 7 wing?) on the Enneagram. If I could have a superpower, I would want control over time, because it’s practical and underused.

    Besides writing, I love reading (obviously), blogging, knitting, and watching Netflix with my roommate. My favorite writing drink is a chai latte, but I enjoy any type of tea . . . or hot chocolate . . . or hot apple cider . . . just not coffee. Favorite authors include Anne Elisabeth Stengl, J.R.R. Tolkien, Brandon Sanderson, Diana Wynne Jones, and Bryan Davis, all five of whom have significantly influenced my writing style.

    My current main project is Dust of Silver, a high fantasy retelling of The Twelve Dancing Princesses mixed with Rapunzel, featuring sisterhood, magic, portals, dragons, diversity, snark, dancing, and just a little bit of romance. Side projects include Fight Song, a superhero novella about a girl with music-based powers who’s trying to track down a murderer, and Blood in the Snow, a Snow White and Goose Girl retelling.

    So, yeah. I think that’s about all. I think I got in a bit late to join a guild, but oh well. Hopefully, signups will open again sometime soonish.

    Can’t wait to meet y’all!

    -Sarah Narnathron

    Welcome to the masquerade.

    #32643
    Sam Kowal
    @sam-kowal

    @sarah-narnathron 😀 Welcome to Story Embers. Those WIPs sound pretty much completely epic 😉 Fight Song especially seems like a cool idea. It’s not often you see music based magic in fantasy.

    Have you read Stormlight? Brandon Sanderson is one of my favorite authors, too. I love how his worlds and characters collide together so harshly

    *nom, nom, nom* *eats donuts*
    Oh, are you hungry? *begins weeping*
    I would have saved you one!

    #32644
    Lady Iliara
    @lady-iliara

      @sam-kowal @sarah-narnathron Ironically, I too am working on a story where one of my characters has music-based powers! She sings things into existence. But, since she’s only 7, they almost never turn out right. 😛

      ENFJ, Aethasian, and chocolate-Pringle-nerd-blob of epic. Greet at your own risk. *trips on a rock*

      #32645
      Allison Grace
      @allison-grace

      Hi, @sarah-narnathron ! I’m a fantasy writer too! What’s high fantasy and low fantasy?

      "I cannot live without books." -Thomas Jefferson

      #32679
      Sarah Narnathron
      @sarah-narnathron

      @Sam-kowal Thank you very much! As for music-based magic . . . it’s a little more common than you’d think? But I took a different route with my music-magic than most of the variations I’ve seen in published stuff. It’s super fun to write, except when I’m like “Darn it, can I use this music word here, or is that wrong?”

      YESSSSS. Stormlight is the best. Well, that or Mistborn, I always go back and forth on which I like better— but yes, Brandon Sanderson is a master of the multiverse, and honestly of worldbuilding in general.


      @Lady-Iliara
      Ooooh. That’s a fun power. But yeah, in the hands of a seven-year-old, the things not turning out right would really be the least of the problems, at least the ones I can think of . . .


      @Allison-Grace
      Hey’a! Nice to meet a fellow fantasy writer. High fantasy and low fantasy are sort of the two most basic distinctions in fantasy, in that books from a lot of other categories also fall into one of them, but they’re also super broad/vague, and therefore sometimes hard to define.

      Essentially, though, high fantasy is stuff like The Lord of the Rings, The Wheel of Time, the Stormlight Archive, the Chronicles of Prydain, books where you have a different world than Earth, an epic scale (often involving the possibility of the end of the world, or at least the destruction of a few major kingdoms), and prevalent magic. High fantasy also tends to involve clear-cut good guys and bad guys who really are good and bad, though this is becoming slightly less of a factor in modern examples.

      Then, for low fantasy, you have books like Ranger’s Apprentice, Redwall, The Goose Girl . . . I’m sure there are examples that aren’t MG/YA, but I can’t think of them right now, except that the earliest Game of Thrones books might count, based on what I’ve heard. Basically, this is fantasy that might or might not take place in a different world than our own (though if it’s in another world, that world might look suspiciously similar to ours), involve problems on a much more local scale, and have either low or no magic. These are also more likely to involve grey-and-grey morality, though that’s not always the case. These are also very easy to get mixed up with urban/contemporary fantasy, which is fantasy set in our world, but honestly, there are some urban fantasy books that I would classify as high fantasy even though it’s not another world.

      Aaaaand that was probably way more info than you wanted. Sorry, I did a project on the different fantasy subgenres at the end of last semester.

      Welcome to the masquerade.

      #32695
      Sam Kowal
      @sam-kowal

      @sarah-narnathron There’s some music magic/power in Echoes from the Edge by Bryan Davis, I think? And also the the elves in Inheritance can sing things into existence, although that’s somewhat taken from Tolkien. Have you ever read Seraphina by Rachel Hartman? Music isn’t magic in that but it a key theme.

      Also, unless its secret, how did you use music magic?  😀

      Yesss. Sanderson’s worldbuilding is amazing. I can’t wait until he starts mixing his worlds and cultures a little, like with Hoid…

      *nom, nom, nom* *eats donuts*
      Oh, are you hungry? *begins weeping*
      I would have saved you one!

      #32707
      Allison Grace
      @allison-grace

      @sarah-narnathron Thank you for explaining! So, Narnia would be low fantasy?

      "I cannot live without books." -Thomas Jefferson

      #32711
      Sarah Narnathron
      @sarah-narnathron

      @Sam-kowal Yep, music-magic of a sort is definitely a thing in Echoes from the Edge. In Inheritance, though, I’m pretty sure that the singing wasn’t essential to the magic; it was just the elves doing it for the Aesthetic. And yes, I loved Seraphina! I haven’t read it in ages, though . . .

      It’s definitely not secret; it comes up in the first few chapters! The basic concept is that every type of thing has a song, and by singing or playing those songs or combining them in certain ways, a person can control different aspects of the world. So, in one of the first few chapters, my MC makes stone soften and harden by singing that stone’s song in a particular way. The thing is, most people can’t hear those songs; in fact, my MC is the only person (at least to her knowledge) who can. Most of the songs belong to physical things, but Death also has a song (which is a major plot point) and so do people as a whole.

      Yesssss. He kind of has already started doing that a little— there was some definite overlap with another of the Cosmere worlds in Edgedancer. But I look forward to it happening more. (I also want it to start happening more with other series, but I’m not sure if it will or not.)


      @Allison-grace
      Narnia is a weird one; it can kind of go either way. I think I would tend to categorize it as High Fantasy because even though Narnia is connected to Earth, it’s very distinct from Earth, plus it has prevalent “magic” (in the sense of talking animals, magical creatures and places, etc.), very distinct good and evil distinctions, and, arguably, large-scale plots that affect the whole world (at least in some of the books). That said, I can also see how you’d categorize it as Low Fantasy given the connection to Earth, especially if you don’t consider talking animals magic and say that the plots tend to be localized to only the country of Narnia. You could even say that some books are more low fantasy and some are more high fantasy. (So, I would definitely categorize LWW, The Last Battle, and probably The Magician’s Nephew as high fantasy, but you could make a solid argument for The Horse and His Boy and Prince Caspian and maybe even The Silver Chair as low fantasy. And then then Dawn Treader doesn’t fit neatly into either category.) So, yeah.

      TL;DR: Because high and low fantasy are such broad categories, the boundaries between them are very fuzzy, and Narnia can be categorized as either one.

      Welcome to the masquerade.

      #32816
      Sam Kowal
      @sam-kowal

      @sarah-narnathron Right, Inheritance was energy based magic… for some reason the singing helped shape the energy into something more beautiful, I guess.

      😀 That magic system honestly sounds really cool. Everything having a song, but then things having greater songs… do individual people have songs? Also, does the MC have to be good at music to do magic or is it something completely different?

       

      *nom, nom, nom* *eats donuts*
      Oh, are you hungry? *begins weeping*
      I would have saved you one!

      #32860
      Sarah Narnathron
      @sarah-narnathron

      @Sam-Kowal Or something. I still think that the elves just did it for the aesthetic, but I could be wrong. I haven’t reread the series in a while.

      Thanks! As far as individual people go . . . Not really? There’s basically one song for people in general, but there might be subtle differences from one person or group to another based on a variety of factors, some physical (namely age, how much muscle vs. fat someone has, and whether or not they have piercings/surgical plates/other random pieces of metal in their bodies) and some psychological (where they consider themselves to be from is one of the major factors in that). But it’s all the same song, just played in different ways. And yes, using the songs does require some skill in music, in particular the ability to play by ear. But the more skilled and creative my MC or anyone else is, the better she or they can use the songs. Thankfully, music is my MC’s passion, and was even before she started hearing the songs.

      Welcome to the masquerade.

      #32923
      Allison Grace
      @allison-grace

      @sarah-narnathron Wow… That is complicated. XD I suppose my novel would be low fantasy. I have no magic, but I have elves and mystical creatures I made up.

      "I cannot live without books." -Thomas Jefferson

      #32941
      WarrenLuther04
      @warrenluther04

      @saran-narnathron I know I’ve said hi before, but: HI again! I am a golden retriever (obviously not literally) and fantasy/realistic fiction/some sci-fi writer.


      @sam-kowal
      Inheritance was energy-based magic. The singing helped channel the flow of the magic through the bearer and through the molecules and atoms in front of the user so that the power would accomplish the task. 😀 #nerd-dom. 😉

      How’s Stan doing? Has he grown any since we last met?

      House Vizsla, Clan Avis
      Member of the Alliance to Restore the Republic, Phoenix Squadron
      ENFJ-T

      #33150
      Sarah Narnathron
      @sarah-narnathron

      @allison-grace Hehe, just a little . . . And probably, yes.


      @warrenluther04
      Hello again to you too!

      Welcome to the masquerade.

      #33153
      Grace Johnson
      @gabbyj

      Hi, @sarah-narnathron!

      Your writing projects sound really awesome!

      Control over time would be neat! One great thing about writing is that you can give your characters all the powers you wish you could have in real life, lol! I do that a lot.

      Out of curiosity, what is Information Design?

      *Swirls cloak dramatically*

      #33228
      Sarah Narnathron
      @sarah-narnathron

      @Gabbyj Thank you! And yeah, that is an awesome aspect of writing. (And I do have a character who can control time, Rebecca Stevens, but her story is currently inactive. *sigh*)

      Um. Well, the easiest way to answer that is to clarify: Professional Writing and Information Design is one major with a long name, not two with short names. And the major as a whole is basically learning how to write and design for the world of business and manufacturing (as opposed to academic or creative writing). So, a PWID major might go into technical writing, instructional design, web writing and design, corporate communication, or even something like marketing that overlaps with another major, and in all those, we write the thing and then we design how the thing is going to look. For example, if you’re looking at a help page for a piece of software, PWID majors (or someone in the same field, not explicitly PWID) might have been the ones to write the software, take any screenshots, and figure out how it’s all laid out on the page. Does that answer the question?

      Welcome to the masquerade.

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