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Conlangers?

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  • #31182
    J.Parkhurst
    @j-parkhurst

    Out of curiosity, are there any other folks working on a constructed language here?

    https://historyheartandhats.wordpress.com/

    #31200
    Daeus Lamb
    @daeus-lamb

    @j-parkhurst I wouldn’t really call myself a Conlanger, but I have invented a very basic functioning grammar for one language. I think it would be fun to go more in-depth with language creation, though I’m a little intimidated by it.

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    #31209
    J.Parkhurst
    @j-parkhurst

    @daeus-lamb I’d love to hear more about it!

    https://historyheartandhats.wordpress.com/

    #31211
    Lady Iliara
    @lady-iliara

    @j-parkhurst Me! Me! I’m inventing a language that’s a strange mix of French, Irish Gaelic, and English for a people I call the Dranga. It’s not really a coordinated effort, though—more like transmogrifying an English sentence. For example:

    “Mi togannar a chec muid.”

    which means “I will take you to our headquarters/village/place.” Togannar is a modified form of the Irish Gaelic verb for “take”, “chez nous” is a French preposition meaning “at our place” and then “muid” means “we” in Irish. 😆

    ENFJ, Aethasian, and chocolate-Pringle-nerd-blob of epic. Greet at your own risk. *trips on a rock*

    #31214
    J.Parkhurst
    @j-parkhurst

    @lady-iliara That sounds neat! Do you have rules you follow for which parts of speech can come from each language? Do you use the English grammar system, then as your primary structure?

    https://historyheartandhats.wordpress.com/

    #31218
    Lady Iliara
    @lady-iliara

    @j-parkhurst Yes, English grammar is my structure; I don’t really have any rules for which language I use, but I try not to use obvious counterparts (for example, when the French word is quite close to the English word). It’s more whatever sounds aesthetically right to me.

    If I planned to use this language a lot I would probably set up some more rules and plan it a bit more. As it is I don’t think it will come into play much, so I’m just sorta winging it. 😉

    ENFJ, Aethasian, and chocolate-Pringle-nerd-blob of epic. Greet at your own risk. *trips on a rock*

    #31220
    J.Parkhurst
    @j-parkhurst

    @lady-iliara Good luck with ‘not using it much’. That’s what I said too, once upon a time! I know have a mostly-working grammar, spelling rules (they’re inherently tied to grammar), and I have to work against creating a paleo-script for the modern script, which I also want to develop soon.

    https://historyheartandhats.wordpress.com/

    #31223
    Lady Iliara
    @lady-iliara

    @j-parkhurst Thanks for the words of warning. I shall beware. 😛

    And wow, a script? That sounds so cool!

    ENFJ, Aethasian, and chocolate-Pringle-nerd-blob of epic. Greet at your own risk. *trips on a rock*

    #31225
    J.Parkhurst
    @j-parkhurst

    It’s what I get for learning Quenya and the tengwar (and a bit of the Sarati, but that’s reference only) and then starting to take up Hebrew by learning the letters first! Language growth and change in reference to the parent culture is also a large factor 🙂

    https://historyheartandhats.wordpress.com/

    #31252
    Daeus Lamb
    @daeus-lamb

    @j-parkhurst Well, the sentence structure just follows English. The only thing really unique about it is the nouns and verbs.

    There are five different classes of nouns and each noun belongs to one class. Each class represents one of the four fantasy races + one that represents the evil monsters and such. Basically, nouns belong to a class because the culture associates them with how they view the races. For instance, the meredin are pure and uncorrupted creatures, so the noun “art” would probably be assigned to their corresponding noun class.

    Each class has six different prefixes. The first division is between masculine and feminine and the second division is between singular, plural, and what I call “general” (“boats” would be an example of a general noun if they are being referenced as a group of transportation vehicles and not a specific set of boats.)

    On top of this standard prefix, nouns can also have a “drm” prefix or suffix. “drm” has a special pronunciation which is hard to describe, but imagine saying “drum” without the u very fast on the tip of your tongue. An indicative noun (i.e. This sandwich) is prefixed by a “drm” while a definite noun “the sandwich” is suffixed by it.

    With verbs, there are three declensions: one for “to be”, one for internal verbs, and one for external verbs. To describe the difference between internal and external, if you had the root form of the word “to leave”, you would give it the internal suffix to describe leaving a belief system and the external suffix to describe leaving a building. Within each declension are six suffixes for past present and future in both active and passive forms. There are also prefixes to show if a verb is continuous, perfect, or perfect continuous.

    My base concept for this language is to make it sound swampy, since it is spoken by swamp creatures in my fantasy novel. Here’s an example of one sentence I wrote in the language. (Murglamin, by the way, is a crop that these swamp creatures grow.)

    “Coho umkalla soom peth eeshgroom murglamin⁠”

    That translates: “A bad neighbor is like rotten murglamin.”

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    #31561
    J.Parkhurst
    @j-parkhurst

    @daeus-lamb The noun class cultural differentiation is a fascinating idea! My nouns have to be classified by suffix to determine the rank of the person being addressed in the conversation. The verb declensions are fascinating too! Are you primarily using prefixes, suffices, infixes, or a mix?

    https://historyheartandhats.wordpress.com/

    #31568
    Daeus Lamb
    @daeus-lamb

    @j-parkhurst For verbs, all of them have suffixes but certain factors will require an additional prefix.

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