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Conflict/Antagonist Questions…

Forums Fiction Characters Conflict/Antagonist Questions…

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  • #30837

    I’m outlining/prewriting/planning my story and having a bit of a problem coming up with my antagonist as a person. I have read that the antagonist doesn’t necessarily have to be a person; they’re just an obstacle. What type of antagonist would fit into a small-town story with a similar feel to L.M. Montgomery? And what kind of obstacle could I have that is not human/animal?

    My theme is perfection and my protagonist is a 12-year-old-girl, altruistic, intuitive, compassionate, extremely private and perfectionistic.

    Spreading God's love until I can see seven billion smiles. 🙂 https://sevenbillionsmiles.home.blog

    #30878
    Rachel Rogers
    @scribbles

    What do your characters love but take for granted? Trees? A clean river full of fish that is the mainstay of the economy? Someone important to the MC? (E.g. MC wants to be a concert pianist –> MC’s piano teacher gets married –> piano teacher’s new husband takes his wife to live elsewhere –> piano teacher’s new husband is the antagonist for roadblocking MC’s goals, even if he’s not *bad*…antagonists just stand between the MC and what they want.) Have somebody go after that and try to take it away from them…either directly for that reason, or for another motive but with the same end effect.

    Like you say, the antagonist doesn’t even have to be a person, but there does have to be something effecting an unwelcome change or hindrance.

    Ambiverted INFP. Scribbles all the words. Names the plant friends. Secretly Edna the Piguirrel.

    #31004

    Thank you!! 🙂 I’ll give that some thought and try to implement it.

    Spreading God's love until I can see seven billion smiles. 🙂 https://sevenbillionsmiles.home.blog

    #31018
    Sarah Baran
    @ethryndal

    @Emma-Starr Just a thought here, but if your theme is perfection, then my two-cents is that the antagonist should be something that inhibits perfection. Internally, that will be the protagonist herself, but externally, it’s anything that interferes with her goal. (As @Scribbles so eloquently pointed out.) Whatever her goal is—whatever thing she’s striving to attain perfection in—the antagonist should be something that ruins that perfection, making it impossible to attain.

    INTJ ➸ https://thesarcasticelf.wordpress.com/

    #31036
    Rachel Rogers
    @scribbles

    @ethryndal @emma-starr

    …if your theme is perfection, then my two-cents is that the antagonist should be something that inhibits perfection.

    YES. THAT. That’s the perfect complement to what I was saying. Thanks for that addition, Sarah. 😀

    Ambiverted INFP. Scribbles all the words. Names the plant friends. Secretly Edna the Piguirrel.

    #31094

    @ethryndal Thank you so much! I’m in the very early stages of my books and nothing is really tied down; I need a solid antagonist to build on. This will help me a lot. 🙂

    Spreading God's love until I can see seven billion smiles. 🙂 https://sevenbillionsmiles.home.blog

    #32152
    cowlick
    @cowlick

    a lot of the time you could work that with just putting your character in a situation that is very challenging for them. there’s no one person who’s being the antagonist. it’s just a very hard situation.

    like for instance, a lot of gordon korman’s books are comedies with no defined human villain. just a bunch of situations and random obstacles to stand in the way of the story goal.

    something i’ve kinda been looking into a lot lately since my WIP doesn’t exactly have a villain either. XD

    toodle-oop

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