Combining Character Flaws with Theme: How?

Forums Fiction Characters Combining Character Flaws with Theme: How?

This topic contains 4 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  CalebOnline 5 days, 3 hours ago.

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  • #94589

    Thomas (CrØss_Bl₳de)
    @thewirelessblade

    Seriously, how? Can you give your character some vices, find a way to fix them, write it and make it a story? Is it that easy?

    No, Thomas, don’t be ridiculous.

    Okay, so it isn’t. So what’s the best way to do that kinda stuff? Any thoughts?

    *Forum Signature here*

    #94635

    I. D. Triskele
    @countryboy77

      Can you expound a bit?

      (XNXP I'm not joking)
      Triskele's Own "48" that is all. -two-finger salutes-

      #95372

      Banana Peacock Warrior
      @banana-peacock-warrior

        @thewirelessblade: I can’t say I’m totally sure what you mean. Is the problem giving your character a believable character arc that flows with the plot/theme? (I love character arcs… :D)

        With ‘combining character flaws with theme’, I mean- a character flaw is one of the best things you can use, I think, to express a theme. Example (I guess): In my current WIP, my theme is that we should use our talents to the glory of the One who gave them to us, and not to our own glory. My MC’s primary flaw is that she is VERY wrapped up in herself: selfish, prideful, obsessed with making herself look good, and a perfectionist always trying to make it totally clear that she’s the best. As the story progresses; and she learns that there’s more to life than just herself, her audiences, and her talents; she finally learns the importance of humility and how her prideful shenanigans are hurting those she loves. While she’s learning this, the readers are watching and learning it too- BOOM. Theme. 😉 😀 So, that’s my take on it.

        You know, there’s this one book that I read called Character Arcs (by K.M.Weiland). If you haven’t read it already, it’s super great! 😉

        Hope that makes sense/helps!!!

        “When anxiety was great within me, your consolation brought me joy.”
        ‭‭Psalm‬ ‭94:19‬ ‭

        #95408

        K.M. Small
        @morreafirebird

        @thewirelessblade I’d second @banana-peacock-warrior . In a story I’m working on, the theme revolves around loneliness. My MC is hyper desperate to be surrounded by people since she’s afraid of loneliness, but also has a long-standing belief that she’ll always be alone. So she unconsciously sabotages her own efforts to make friends, showing her “fatal flaw” to be that she’s withdrawn. Through the story, I’m going to have her realize that expelling loneliness necessitates truly opening up to others and letting them in, rather than pulling away.

        So, in a sense, you have to find what your theme is, what your character believes about your theme, and how what they believe is expressed externally. Right there, you’ll likely find your character’s flaw and how it relates to theme. Does that make sense?

        ~ Khylie (formerly Audrey)
        Old-soul bookdragon with a pet phoenix. Probably lost in an imaginary world

        #97008

        CalebOnline
        @calebonline

        One other way to illuminate your theme under the light of character is with a foil; a character who is a contrast to your main character. It helps to more clearly define flaws and contrasts the way one person lives with what it’s like to be the OPPOSITE way

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