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Any guys out there?

Forums Fiction General Writing Discussions Any guys out there?

Viewing 15 posts - 256 through 270 (of 1,075 total)
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  • #54429
    Buddy J.
    @wordsmith

    @eden-anderson

    XD

    Published author, student in writing, works with HazelGracePress.com

    #54441
    Brink
    @nuetrobolt

    @theinconceivable1 I’ve mostly talked to homeschoolers, but I thought those were jus the people I talked with. Are you homeschooled. I’m in grade ten, so should be in grade nine. I like lego, but I guess that isn’t as strange since I’m fourteen.

    Your story is yours and no one else's. Each sunset is different, depending where you stand. -A. Peterson

    #54443
    theinconceivable1
    @theinconceivable1

    @rochellaine: “regarding the tassels, about how they have to do with the representation of priestly authority and that being fulfilled.” *nods slowly* I guess…*nods a little faster as he thinks about it more* ya ok. I still think tassels are a weird law though XD

    “That being said, I’ll go back to my earlier statement about how we can use all the commandments of the OT in our search for how to love God and each other better. ”  honestly I cant think of any acceptions so ya, I agree! : D

    “Some of the OT laws don’t need to be followed literally and strictly anymore, for a multitude of reasons, but we can use them as guidelines for what God finds acceptable and respectful.  I’m sure there are better answers given by more qualified people than I, but that’s the best I can do right now.” I think the only danger in this is just in how you turn the laws into guidelines. because if these guidelines become rules like you must “dress respectfully during worship” and you must keep the Sabbath then we are returning back to the law from which we have been freed. So ya, I get what you mean I think but I can easily see it being taken to far you know?

    INTJ- trying to grow into real wisdom; James 3:17

    #54459
    The Fledgling Artist
    @the-fledgling-artist

    @theinconceivable1
    Yeah, I think that’s what I am saying haha. 😀 Back to “Sin is an attitude” Um, I think in a sense, yes it is an attitude.. But a sinful attitude will almost always lead to sinful action. There are some actions that would only ever come out of a sinful attitude. I feel that I’m being a little confusing.. If you have to read what I just said a couple times I wont judge. Let me see if I can restate in a less confusing manner.
    There is such a thing as sinful action, but sinful action comes from a sinful attitude. You don’t really get one without the other.

    Yeah, I think since Jesus took the punishment for our (all of humanity’s) sin, there is no longer a need for us to punish or inflict any form of violence on anyone.

    Did I miss anything here?


    @eden-anderson
    Aww, thanks! That’s really sweet of you. 🙂 Haha If I’m doing anything right you can thank God, because without his direction I’d just be rambling a bunch of nonsense.

    "Though I'm not yet who I will be, I'm no longer who I was."

    #54462
    Buddy J.
    @wordsmith

    @the-fledgling-artist

    May I try to clarify something? I think what you’re trying to say is this (now please correct me if I’m wrong): A sin is anything that falls short. That is the definition of the word sin. And when referring to God and his expectations, it is anything that falls short of the glory of God. Now… there are actions that fall short of the glory of God. God set up standards. And when we break those standards we sin whether we intend to or not. And so to say that a sin is the attitude… no… by definition it is anything that falls short. That includes the action… and it includes the attitude. But it’s dangerous to separate them.

    Did I represent you well?

    Published author, student in writing, works with HazelGracePress.com

    #54469
    The Fledgling Artist
    @the-fledgling-artist

    @wordsmith Yeah I agree with what you said. Thanks!

    "Though I'm not yet who I will be, I'm no longer who I was."

    #54473
    Buddy J.
    @wordsmith

    @the-fledgling-artist

    Cool!

    Published author, student in writing, works with HazelGracePress.com

    #54496
    Rochellaine
    @rochellaine

    @eden-anderson @wordsmith Wow, thank you guys for saying I’m making sense.  I always wonder if I explain things correctly because I have a tendency to ramble.  So I’m really glad I’m articulating myself well on this topic. 😉


    @theinconceivable1
    I definitely agree that there’s a huge risk of us becoming pharisaical.  Our doing things should result from our love for God and our wanting to please Him to the utmost of our abilities, rather than from a required set of rules that we must follow in order to show how “good” we are.  Because, as you say, it all comes from the heart.

    And in the end, I think most of it comes down to Romans 14.  If there’s something we feel at liberty to do under Christ, we must always first make sure we are not causing another believer to stumble.

    Nonsense makes the heart grow fonder ~ Carolyn Wells

    #54503
    Rochellaine
    @rochellaine

    @theinconceivable1 Oh, I want to clarify that I do think it’s possible to commit a sin even if you think it’s “for a good cause” or as the saying goes “your heart is in the right place.” Wrong things are still wrong, no matter what the intent is.

    I’m just saying that the reason we should do right things shouldn’t be because we want to win points, but because we just have such a great desire to please God that we’ll do all we can to behave in a certain manner so that He is pleased.  Which is, I think, a part of what you are saying, is it not?

    Nonsense makes the heart grow fonder ~ Carolyn Wells

    #54577
    Buddy J.
    @wordsmith

    @rochellaine

    You are articulating yourself very well!

    Published author, student in writing, works with HazelGracePress.com

    #54749
    Rochellaine
    @rochellaine

    @wordsmith Thanks. 😀

    Nonsense makes the heart grow fonder ~ Carolyn Wells

    #54765
    Noah Litle
    @noahlitle

    @rochellaine I agree with @wordsmith and @eden-anderson. You have been pretty clear, and I agree with most of what you have said. It’s just little nit-picky stuff I disagree with. Stuff that doesn’t matter much anyway. 🙂


    @nuetrobolt
    I’m part of New Wessex. Which is the bestest guild. XD


    @theinconceivable1

    Sorry it took me so long to reply. I will try to be as brief as I can.

    First of all, the article that you linked basically just had a list of all the verses that mentioned “lasting ordinance” then said, in their words: “As these passages note, the idea of a lasting ordinance indicated an ongoing law, but it was not always intended to be eternal.” But they didn’t give any scripture to back this up. (I’ll address the scripture you gave in a moment.)

    1. I agree with your first bullet point. It’s not a good idea to get hung up on words. At the same time, trying to dismiss something in scripture with another part of scripture is dangerous, whatever the reason is.

    2. In answer to your answer to my question:-) I will not claim to understand what Paul was trying to say there (2Co. 3:9-11). Peter himself says that Paul is hard to understand, and easy to twist (2Pe. 3:16).

    But I will point out that Paul himself was a Jew, and I think it’s reasonable to assume that he obeyed Torah to the best of his ability to his dying breath (Acts 24:16; Php. 3:5-6). I doubt that he would say that we no longer need to obey the Mosaic law. In fact, most of his arguments came from the scripture (Acts 17:10-12 – which would have been the OT), and that was one of the things that annoyed him about the Jews. They opposed him without scriptural reason. So much so that he eventually had to give up on witnessing to them (Acts 13:46).

    Besides this, all of our definitions of Moral Law originally came from the Mosaic Law. You can’t take one, and leave the other. Moses brought the Ten Commandments just the same as he brought the commandment to slaughter the red heifer (Num. 19:1-10) and the law for the captive bride (Deu. 21:10-14). (Which, by the way, are both beautiful pictures of Jesus.) They’re all mixed together in the Bible.

    So here’s my opinion: All of the law is fulfilled in the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus. All of the law can still be observed by us today.

    Most of it can’t be applied for various reasons. Such as, the laws for the priests and Levites, or the laws for the temple/tabernacle/priesthood. But some of it can. Such as the laws for the feasts (Lev. 23), or the dietary laws (Lev. 11; Deu. 14:3-21. Which I think have more to do with holiness than health, but that’s another rabbit-trail).

    And all of it is meant to be shadows and types that point to Jesus Christ. Even the “Moral” laws.

    Having all that said, don’t obey the law, follow Christ.

    Everyone, throughout all of history, is saved the same way. Jesus died before the foundations of the world (Rev. 13:8) so that Abraham could be declared righteous “by faith” (read Heb. 11 and Gen. 15:6).

    We’re saved through faith, not from obeying the law. So the question becomes, does it matter if we obey the law or not? What do you think?

    Anyway, I’ve spent too much time on this already. I need to go work on my WIP. 🙂

    Legos!? Yes! I’m 21 and I still play with Legos every once in a while. XD I’ve got a little Lego typewriter on my desk right now.


    @the-fledgling-artist
    About the temple, I don’t believe the temple/sacrifices were ever needed for salvation, but I do think there are some beautiful pictures of Jesus in the sacrificial laws that we’re missing because we can’t do them. Some laws you just can’t understand unless you do them.

    Alright, I’m going to help New Wessex with the word war. We’re going to beat all y’all. 🙂

    p.s. I only know a little.

    #54790
    Eden Anderson
    @eden-anderson

    @noahlitle

    Yes! New Wessex is TOTALLY the best!!! *drum roll, please* 😀😀😀

    "But how could you live and have no story to tell?" - Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    #54841
    Skye
    @skye

    Alrighty. I’ve been half following this thread for too long and have finally decided to jump in. Before I throw in my two cents, though, I want to start with a couple notes.

    1. I am a girl. So thank you for letting me into this thread, haha
    2. I am not a master of the Bible by any sense of the word. However, I like to think that I am at least somewhat familiar with it. That being said, like any human, the things that I say very well could be off, and honestly, to support a lot of my points, I’m going to be using logic and personal experience. I’ll use Scripture, too, though. Just know that I might accidentally use things out of context and that sort of stuff… I’m no master. I will say that I believe what the Bible says, 110%, even though I do not understand it. I also believe in absolute truth. Which means that there is a right, and there is a wrong.
    3. I think it’s important to define the purpose of this discussion on self-defense, sin, OT vs. NT law, etc. Are we trying to come to a conclusion of “This is right”? Or are we simply trying to voice our opinions and disagree with each other and explain how we disagree? Either way I don’t think it’s the best use of our time, honestly. This is a writing forum, not a philosophy one – so in my personal opinion, I don’t think we should be trying to convert each other on nonessential doctrine. And if it’s just continually expounding on how we disagree? I’ll let you decide if that’s the best use of your time… I don’t think it is the best use of mine, and as a college student, my time is limited. I can’t promise that I will be able to respond to everyone, or even that I’ll give it my best shot. But, that being said, this is a topic that does interest me, so I will voice my initial opinion.

    Ok. Let’s get going.

    Self-defense is a topic that I’ve considered a lot. I’m not 21 yet, but I plan on getting my concealed carry permit when I am of age. There are many factors that impact this decision. One, it’s my heritage. I grew up in a family that has packed for generations – some of them, just to exercise their 2nd Amendment Rights (b’cause my dad’s side is ornery), some “just in case”. My mom has her CC Permit, and she didn’t grow up in a house with guns. She has it because she knows that if came down to killing someone or letting them kill my four year old sister, she would choose the former. Or for any of my siblings. And y’all don’t know my mom, but she’s a lady’s lady, wouldn’t hurt a fly. She chose to pack because she loves us. It’s not for her. It’s not for glory. It’s not so she can be a hero if the incident arose. It’s so she can defend the ones she loves.

    I think self-defense would be more palatable to some people if the title was changed slightly to reflect its proper use. Call it “Selfless-defense”. Packing is a privilege, but it is not one to take lightly. There are effects from having to kill someone – anything from court cases, conscience, to PTSD. As much as it is a right, it is a responsibility. In a way, it’s a sacrifice, because it calls you to a higher standard.

    If you pack, you’re literally carrying a lethal weapon with you – you have to carry that burden. And some people can’t! That’s just reality! And that’s ok. It shouldn’t brand them as weaker, rather, to recognize that they can’t live up to this standard is a sign of personal strength and integrity. You’re not trying to be something you’re not, when the effects of this facade could hurt someone.

    If you pack, you’re allowing the burden of others to be put on yourself. Like I said, my mom packs to protect my siblings and I. This is as far as she’d probably take it; if we were all safe she wouldn’t go out to face the attacker. We’d retreat. But if it was my dad, and we were all safe, but there were still other people in the line of fire, I think he would go out an engage the perpetrator. This isn’t because he’s violent or looking for a fight, but because of what he sees as his responsibility. Because he’s been packing for over 20 years, he knows that if a situation arises, he could be somebody’s last chance at life. He would put his own life on the line – sacrifice – to defend a stranger, because of what he knows his abilities to be. In an active shooter situation, his ability turns into a responsibility. To him, “…who knows the good he ought to do and doesn’t do it, sins.” (James 4:17)

    But wait a second… the Bible very clearly says that to murder is sin. If we define murder as premeditated killing, well, then (hypothetically – a situation like this has never arose), this would paint my dad as a murderer. After all, he’s been fine tuning his skills for 40-odd years, preparing for the day that he crosses path with his enemy. So by doing good he’s sinning? And by sinning he’s doing good?

    Yup.

    To a degree, at least. I did twist words a bit there to prove a point, but that point remains: we can do both good and evil in one action. I’ll pull the classic Corrie ten Boom example – her family lied (sin) to save Jews (which is a good thing). Or Rahab and the spies – same principle. What about people who steal medicine to save their dying children? Or someone who swipes a sandwich and gives it to a homeless person? See, there are tons of situations where good and evil are both present. So, I guess in this case, I side with Martin Luther – sin boldly, knowing that your sin is not going to disqualify you from heaven (assuming you’ve accepted Jesus, but that’s a discussion for a different time), in the hope that you might give someone else a chance to accept Jesus.

    But what about the perpetrator? Aren’t you disqualifying him from his second chance? If you kill him, yes. This doesn’t always happen, to be fair. But I’d like to point out that he chose his path – the potential victims did not ask to be shot at.

    Another matter which plays into this is Christian liberty. “One man considers one day more sacred than another; another man considers every day alike. Each one should be fully convinced in his own mind. He who regards one day as special, does so to the Lord. He who eats meat, eats to the Lord, for he gives thanks to God; and he who abstains does so to the Lord and gives thanks to God. For none of us lives to himself alone and none of us dies to himself alone. If we live, we live to the Lord; and if we die, we die to the Lord. So, whether we live or die, we belong to the Lord… So then, each of us will give an account of himself to God. Therefore let us stop passing judgment on one another. Instead, make up your mind not to put any stumbling block or obstacle in your brother’s way… Let us therefore make every effort to do what leads to peace and to mutual edification… So whatever you believe about these things keep between yourself and God. Blessed is the man who does not condemn himself by what he approves. But the man who has doubts is condemned if he eats, because his eating is not from faith; and everything that does not come from faith is sin.” (Romans 14:5-23, jumping around… the whole chapter is really good).

    What I’m trying to get at is that it might be a sin for @eden-anderson or @the-fledgling-artist or the other pacifists (sorry if I missed anyone or tagged you in error) to act out in selfless-defense, because their conscious won’t allow it. That doesn’t make them lesser Christians, it’s just their personal convictions. On the opposite end of the spectrum, looking purely at the Christian liberty argument, it wouldn’t be a sin for @wordsmith or me (again, sorry if I missed anyone… there are a LOT of replies to this thread!) to act in selfless-defense.

    Bottom line, I guess, is that we will all have to give account for our actions once we get to heaven. I believe that God is gracious, and he knows that we will sin. I’m going to try not to sin, but there are some cases where this isn’t possible (again, James 4:17 vs. life circumstances). I will pack with the intention of defending myself, those I love, and those around me. I know that this will have consequences for myself and others, but I also know that the number of people who will have to face these consequences (having a lost loved one) will be fewer if I act.

    That got long, haha. But thanks for reading. If you have specific questions, feel free to ask. I’ll see what I can do about responses… life is busy.

    Cheers.

     

    https://pilgrimwest.wordpress.com/
    https://thingsabove32.wordpress.com/

    #54842
    Buddy J.
    @wordsmith

    @skye

    Hey there! Thanks! Those thoughts were helpful… in the extreme (at least to me). I appreciate your input.

    Published author, student in writing, works with HazelGracePress.com

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